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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a hell of a time almost a year ago getting my S3 to work with Comcast. I won't go into details, but it was Comcast's fault, not TiVos. Unfamiliarity with setting up cable cards.

Now I am considering upgrading my DSL connection and phone to the Comcast Triple Play to take advantage of the cost savings and improved bandwidth. Part of me feels that I should leave well enough alone--My phone (Verizon), TV, and internet (Verizon DSL) work fine. FIOS is not offered in my area, so that is not an option.

If I move to Comcast triple play do I risk putting myself through the same TiVo/Comcast Cable Card headaches again? Am I more likely to get pixelization/signal drops on my TiVo?
 

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I can not answer your question but thought I would make some general comments:

VOIP phones do work fine but it is not as good as old stile phone system - quality is more in line with cell phones. I have had a number of friends switch to various VOIP systems and the quality loss is noticeable. Also with VOIP your phone will be out when the power is out (unless you have a power backup).

If cable is actually faster than DSL depends on how many people are sharing your connection and how much they are using it.

I don't have Verizon or Comcast but you have to ask yourself who gives you better service and are the lower costs Comcast is offering long term or a teaser rate.

Good Luck,
 

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I have two coworkers who have the triple play. One said his phone quality improved, the other said he could not tell a difference from when he had the phone company.
having the triple play won't impact bandwidth since according to my workers they notice no difference in their TV service or Internet service since getting the triple play. I would have switched to the triple play myself if they didn't start offering FIOS here recently. Now I'm just counting the days until I can drop comcast and move my other boxes over to FIOS.
 

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In Berkeley, the COMCAST device into which the phone plugs has a small battery and will last for maybe half an hour or more without power. Our daughter has the triple play and her Tivo is plugged into the LAN which goes into this multiple-mode device. No issues.

I'm no COMCAST fanboy but they aren't unaware of emergency issues or the need to ride through power issues of less than major level.

But in your specific instance it would be worth asking them for the specifics as there may well be variations across their network.

The voice quality is no different than land lines in this instance, as well. But no doubt it can also vary across the nation.

regards,

patrick
 

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I have the Triple Play, an although I did have some initial set-up issues (yes, cable cards), things are working great now. If you already have the cable cards working, moving to triple play shouldn't cause any changes to current cable set-up. Just new phone set-ups. As much as I'm not a Comcast fan, the cost saving for triple play was pretty substantial for me, so I took the plunge.

_mike
 

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atmuscarella said:
VOIP phones do work fine but it is not as good as old stile phone system - quality is more in line with cell phones. I have had a number of friends switch to various VOIP systems and the quality loss is noticeable. Also with VOIP your phone will be out when the power is out (unless you have a power backup).
Comcast's phone service is not VOIP, since Cocast broadasts their phone networt over their cable infrastructure. VOIP, on the other hand, such as Vonage, broadcasts over the internet and does not have its own infrastructure. Accordingly, Comcast's system (and performance) is closer to the phone company than a VOIP provider.
 

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drew00001 said:
Comcast's phone service is not VOIP, since Cocast broadasts their phone networt over their cable infrastructure. VOIP, on the other hand, such as Vonage, broadcasts over the internet and does not have its own infrastructure. Accordingly, Comcast's system (and performance) is closer to the phone company than a VOIP provider.
What?

VOIP means Voice Over Internet Protocol. But that doesn't mean it has to be "The Internet". If you run it over a private IP network it is still VOIP.

Comcast's service *is* VOIP, it is just running over their closed data network and not "the public Internet".
 

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megazone said:
What?

VOIP means Voice Over Internet Protocol. But that doesn't mean it has to be "The Internet". If you run it over a private IP network it is still VOIP.

Comcast's service *is* VOIP, it is just running over their closed data network and not "the public Internet".
Comcast always calls itself "digital voice," rather than VOIP. I acknowledge that this could just be marketing hype, but have seen other sources differentiate Comcast from VOIP. Here is what wikipedia has to say on the subject:

Comcast Digital Voice "is similar to VoIP, but differs in that it operates on a dedicated server and assigns priority to the information sent over the CDV network, and also means that the information is not transmitted over the public Internet. This prevents calls made over the CDV network from being subject to reduced quality due to network congestion, but does nothing to avoid congestion on the hybrid fibre-coaxial network at the customer end, where it is much more likely to occur. However, it does increase network security, and thus the security of calls made over the network."
 

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Comcast Digital Voice "is similar to VoIP, but differs in that it operates on a dedicated server and assigns priority to the information sent over the CDV network, and also means that the information is not transmitted over the public Internet.
Right and Comcast has a private line to every phone in the world :rolleyes: You call someone that is using another VOIP service with comcast's service and it likely is going over the public internet. Comcast's network maybe "closed" but unless you only call people using Comast's phone service at some point the call leaves their network.
 

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megazone is right. Comcast "digital voice," just like every phone service offered by a cable company, is VOIP. That "Motorola box" is just a cable modem with a VOIP router built in. If the router were separated, you still wouldn't need a coax splitter, because you would just run ETHERNET from the cable modem to the router, just like you would with any other router.

That wiki entry that drew referenced about the CDV network is just marketing speak. Since Skype runs P2P, they are differentiating their service by highlighting how the network functions (dedicated server, etc), not the technology, to improve most call quality and security.

As for whether adding the "triple play" will mess with your cable cards, it should not. You will ditch your DSL modem and replace it with a cable modem (perhaps with built in VOIP router). This should not affect your cable cards in the slightest; you are just adding another service to your account on a different frequency.
 

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atmuscarella said:
Right and Comcast has a private line to every phone in the world :rolleyes: You call someone that is using another VOIP service with comcast's service and it likely is going over the public internet. Comcast's network maybe "closed" but unless you only call people using Comast's phone service at some point the call leaves their network.
I would bet that when a call leaves the Comcast network, it goes over the traditional POTS(*) phone network, not the Internet. True, if the the other end is another VOIP provider, it will eventually get on the Internet at that provider's interconnect with the public phone network, but that is not Comcast's concern.

(*) POTS = Plain Old Telephone Service
 

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Assuming the responses here are correct, it seems Comcast Digital Voice is "VOIP plus POTS," while other VOIP providers are merely VOIP alone. In any case, my experience with Comcast is much better than my experience with Vonage. YMMV
 

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drew00001 said:
Assuming the responses here are correct, it seems Comcast Digital Voice is "VOIP plus POTS," while other VOIP providers are merely VOIP alone. In any case, my experience with Comcast is much better than my experience with Vonage. YMMV
My understanding is that ALL VOIP providers interconnect with the public switched telephone network (PSTN) to handle calls to numbers outside their network. One reason Comcast could be better is that for the part on their own network, the voice data is given special handling (and then handed off to the PSTN if necessary), whereas Vonage data is handled the same as any other public Internet traffic, before it is handed off to the PSTN if necessary.
 

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That is actually completely incorrect. The Voip is not just a router running over the internet side of the connection, there are 2 line cards in the modem and they have their own mac address for the phone side. It is handled as if it were it's own standalone docsis device, it just happens to have 1 cable going into it, to be more precise it's like it has it's own line splitter inside. The modem and voice sides of the EMTA are actually seperate from each other and can be independently reset/provisioned etc.

Revolutionary said:
megazone is right. Comcast "digital voice," just like every phone service offered by a cable company, is VOIP. That "Motorola box" is just a cable modem with a VOIP router built in. If the router were separated, you still wouldn't need a coax splitter, because you would just run ETHERNET from the cable modem to the router, just like you would with any other router.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
nibeck said:
I have the Triple Play, an although I did have some initial set-up issues (yes, cable cards), things are working great now. If you already have the cable cards working, moving to triple play shouldn't cause any changes to current cable set-up. Just new phone set-ups. As much as I'm not a Comcast fan, the cost saving for triple play was pretty substantial for me, so I took the plunge.

_mike
Thanks Mike. You're the only one who actually answered my original question! Anyone else want to weigh in?

Not as a slight to everyone else! I am genuinely finding the conversation about VoIP to be fascinating. (No sarcasm intended) Funny how these threads get a life of their own!
 

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We've had the Comcast Digital package for a while now and have had no problems with the Tivo working or talking with the network. Both of mine run wireless to the router.

As for the whole VOIP service, the Comcast "digital voice" is great. Very clean sound, great features. Easy to use.

As for connecting to another non-POTS telephone, we will get some static once in a while but nothing major. We call up to family in New England that has Time Warner and get some issues now and again.
 
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