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Very helpful but I have a question... how do you get the existing capacitors out before putting the new ones in? I haven't removed the power supply board yet. Do I melt the solder on the bottom of the board where the capacitor join? In the movie it looks like he just snaps them out but I don't understand why that would work.

Thanks for your advice!
I definitely recommend the solder sucker over soldering wick.



Scott
 

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I have one of those for I bet 20 years now. There is also a smaller brother to that, but this has more suction which is the key. ;)
 

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....... how do you get the existing capacitors out before putting the new ones in? I haven't removed the power supply board yet. Do I melt the solder on the bottom of the board where the capacitor join? .......
First I add my vote to solder suckers over wicking --- maybe just my poor technique but I never had much luck with wick.

Here's what I recommend:
General warning: Try to minimize stress and heat on the printed circuit board at all times.
1. Heat the solder pad at each cap lead wire (on the underside of board) enough to melt the solder (but not any more than that) and use the sucker to remove as much solder as possible. Do this for both leads of the cap.
2. If there is enough lead wire exposed to make it practical, snip the excess lead.
3. Now heat each pad just enough to melt while rocking and gently pulling on the cap. Alternate this between the two leads and repeat until the cap is free.
4. Use heat and sucker to clean the through holes to facilitate inserting the new cap. (Observe polarity!)
 

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I have one of those for I bet 20 years now. There is also a smaller brother to that, but this has more suction which is the key. ;)
Agreed! I had no problems with mine removing the solder in one shot on both of our S3's. I do have a standard Weller soldering station which may have helped in insuring that all the solder was melted though.

Scott
 

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Adding another report of a 200V 470uf failing on a tivoHD power supply.

Supply had previously been repaired several years ago by replacing C403 and C503, but had died again.

Replaced ALL the caps with new ones. Interestingly, the only cap that actually tested as bad this round was the large 200v 470 uF. It was completely open circuit on an ESR meter.
 

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Is this the correct thread for repairing a TiVo Series 3 HD DVR TCD-648250B
that has a clicking noise coming from the power supply and lines on the TV in time with the clicking. I looked at the capacitors and none are bulging or look like they are leaking.
 

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Is this the correct thread for repairing a TiVo Series 3 HD DVR TCD-648250B
that has a clicking noise coming from the power supply and lines on the TV in time with the clicking. I looked at the capacitors and none are bulging or look like they are leaking.
Try disconnecting the power and data plug from the hard drive (after properly shutting down the TiVo--find the menu item that says "restart", do the 3 thumbs down and hit the little Enter button at the bottom right of the remote, then pull the plug from the wall socket before it can reboot).

Then plug the power cord back in (you'll get the Welcome screen but it'll never move on from that).

Does it still click?

If not, maybe it's the drive that's clicking, or maybe lowering the current demand on the power supply makes the difference in whether it clicks.

Hook the drive up to a PC's power cable (not data, just power) and see if the drive clicks. If it doesn't, then chances are the power supply is headed downhill, although I'd confirm that with a voltmeter reading on the yellow (+12V) and red (+5V) wires.
 

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Just a quick thank you to everyone who helped me with my bad series 3 HD power supply. I ordered all the replacement capacitors, bought the desoldering thingy (and a new soldering iron because the one I had was low watt) from RadShack and relpaced the two capacitors that were visibly bad. I thought about replacing them all but I'm inexperienced enough that the first two were hard enough. I also tried the soldering wick for removing solder and that was useless. But the RadShack de-solderer actually worked a little better than I expected. Melting in some new solder seemed to help.

Various difficulties I hit along the way that others may want to think about if they do the same thing:

* read the fine print on soldering iron packaging. the first soldering iron I bought had packaging which implied 60 watt, but it was an 18 watt iron.

* some of the capacitors are glued to other parts. One of the two I replaced was under a heat sink and glued to another part. It was easy to seperate them once I figured out a good technique (crush glue with needlenose pliers) but before I got that far I think I stressed the other part enough that I popped the solder off the back of the board for one of it's connections. I think that sounds unlikely but I have no other explanation for why I later discovered that part had one unsoldered connection on the back.

* I wish I knew enough about boards to know why there are giant bands of solder material running around on the back that are less than 1 millimeter from the thing you need to solder. Why couldn't the freakin quarter inch band of solder have been a bit narrower and provided more space from stuff it isn't supposed to touch? On my first attempt to test my work the power supply just clicked. I don't know much but I know that means a short. That was when I found the unsoldered component and also noticed one of my newly installed capacitors had solder that was touching one of those bands. I fixed both as best I could and tried again.

* second test was better, no clicking. Tivo got as far as Ready Set Tivo on front panel but never farther and black screen. I read around some more here and learned that you should get the Welcome screen even with no drive, and also that for some reason I don't grok that composite video was being recommended as the startup tv connection rather than hdmi. So I did both of those and got the welcome screen.

* that was a good sign for motherboard and power supply health, so then I reattached the drive but left it on composite video and tried again. Bingo! I got through guided setup.

* I had replaced the drive earler before learning it was the power supply, so the drive was new. After getting through guided setup I got the hardware error 51. Which it appears means the drive had content that was from another tivo - probably from whatever test setup dvrdaddy uses to setup the drives. So then I had to go through guided setup again after choosing "Delete all contents" from the Reset menu.

Now everything seems to be working great. It took lots of reading, multiple tool runs, and multiple tries given my limited skillset, but I stuck with it and it seems to have paid off.

By the way, check out the Hakko 808 Desoldering Gun if you are doing this a lot. It was out of my price range given I wass repairing a single tivo, but that thing looks cool for pros. There are some videos on youtube that make it look pretty neato. I don't have personal experience with it, though.
 

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Yeah, the Radio Shack soldering irons are about the same as anyone else's cheap soldering irons, which makes them usable, and the de-soldering iron that has the bulb that looks like it came off a turkey baster is actually not a bad piece of gear, but the de-soldering braid they switched to a few years ago is just a waste of whatever it's made from.

The thing to do is get the bad caps out and de-solder the holes they were in as fully as possible.

Then put the new cap leads through the board, observing polarity, and heat up one of the leads and the copper around the hole, and then feed the solder against the lead and the copper around the hole, letting them melt it, rather than the iron. You'll get less of a glob that way.
 

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After successfully rescuing my Series3 with a PSU cap replacement by gleaming information from a handful of places and using Blahman's original Mouser project to order the parts, I was inspired to try to consolidate some of this down for brave souls of the future.

I've gone ahead and created some Mouser projects for the S3 and HD PSUs based on the information available in this thread. I've also linked to diagrams in this thread that show what goes where.

Hopefully this little collection of Mouser projects and diagrams will make things a bit easier for the next guy walking down this path.

Thanks to Blahman for the original Mouser project.
Thanks to wobly and HerronScott for the part lists.
Thanks to CraigK for the capacitor location diagrams.
Thanks to Unitron for helping everyone with everything. :)

Series3 TCD 648 PSU Mouser Project

TiVo HD TCD 652 3Y Power Technology PSU Mouser Project
TiVo HD TCD 652 3Y Power Technology PSU Capacitor Locations

TiVo HD TCD 652 AcBel PSU Mouser Project
TiVo HD TCD 652 AcBel Capacitor Locations
Thanks to this post and many others here, I was able get my power supply working again. Replaced C701, C702, C401, and C402. All were obviously bulging and the TiVo was in a constant reboot condition.
 

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How much of a difference does the capacitor's ripple current make?

I need to replace the bulging C401 and C402 capacitors on my SPWR-00008-000 RevA3 power supply (Series3 HD). I found the specs for the original OST 6.3V 2200uF capacitors and it lists an 1820mArms ripple.

The closest capacitor that I can find at Jameco Electronics has a 710mA ripple current:
Capacitor 2200 uF 6.3 Volt 20% 10 X 20mm Radial 5mm 710ma 1000 Hour

The Digi-Key P14365-ND that HerronScott recommended has a 2.18A ripple current.

Will using a 710mA capacitor work correctly? If not, can someone point me to the correct capacitor at Jameco? Jameco is right by my house so it's more convenient than ordering from Digi-Key.
 

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How much of a difference does the capacitor's ripple current make?

I need to replace the bulging C401 and C402 capacitors on my SPWR-00008-000 RevA3 power supply (Series3 HD). I found the specs for the original OST 6.3V 2200uF capacitors and it lists an 1820mArms ripple.

The closest capacitor that I can find at Jameco Electronics has a 710mA ripple current:
Capacitor 2200 uF 6.3 Volt 20% 10 X 20mm Radial 5mm 710ma 1000 Hour

The Digi-Key P14365-ND that HerronScott recommended has a 2.18A ripple current.

Will using a 710mA capacitor work correctly? If not, can someone point me to the correct capacitor at Jameco? Jameco is right by my house so it's more convenient than ordering from Digi-Key.
I doubt that it matters, but know I'm no electrical engineer.

If it's any consolation I used this one from the mouser project: Mfr. #: EEU-FR0J222
Desc.: Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors - Leaded 6.3VDC 2200uF 10x20mm LS5mm
for the ps in my S3 648250 (oled) TiVo.
Works just fine far as I can tell.
 

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I really like the fact that my new Roamio has a Wall wart that can be replaced by a brand new one for around $7, from Tivo. :)
Hmmm, I wonder if there is a way to hack up the old S3 to use an external power supply (wall wart) instead of the internal one? That would solve the capacitor problem once and for all, and a lifetime S3 might truly live forever :)

Thanks folks for the parts lists, I just ordered a full set from DigiKey and will be replacing them sometime next week. I am also replacing my stock hard drive with a 2TB drive (that I just performed wdidle3 /d on a few hours ago).
 

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The ability to replace the capacitors with high quality ones is what will make your lifetime S3 quasi-immortal. Since it appears you are about to do just that, I would say it's not worth the additional effort of trying to convert it to an external power supply. The replacement capacitors shouldn't need replacing anytime soon.
 

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Hmmm, I wonder if there is a way to hack up the old S3 to use an external power supply (wall wart) instead of the internal one? That would solve the capacitor problem once and for all, and a lifetime S3 might truly live forever :)

Thanks folks for the parts lists, I just ordered a full set from DigiKey and will be replacing them sometime next week. I am also replacing my stock hard drive with a 2TB drive (that I just performed wdidle3 /d on a few hours ago).
The wall-wart would have to be quite large and heavy, and would need to supply 3 or 4 different DC output voltages, or else you'd need circuitry inside to derive +5V, +3.3V (and on an original S3, +7.5V) from a high current +12V feed.

Might as well have it all inside the box.

The Roamios use less current than the S3 models (and probably only 12V and 5V), so a wall-wart is more feasible.
 

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The wall-wart would have to be quite large and heavy, and would need to supply 3 or 4 different DC output voltages, or else you'd need circuitry inside to derive +5V, +3.3V (and on an original S3, +7.5V) from a high current +12V feed.

Might as well have it all inside the box.

The Roamios use less current than the S3 models (and probably only 12V and 5V), so a wall-wart is more feasible.
Good point. For this design it wouldn't be worth using such a complex wall wart with 4 voltages coming out of it.

I still haven't received my new capacitors, but I just changed the C701 part to a new 50V part a few minutes ago. All I have here right now are 50V parts, so most of them are too big to fit the small area available, but the C701 part fit perfectly. Happens to be that the C701 part is the only one that was bulging anyway. I will test it when I get home this afternoon.

My new hard drive worked well pre-expansion and after Tivo updated it to 11m, I took a backup of course. Then I expanded it and it now has 2776 hrs SD and 318 hrs HD. Seems to be working well (for 10 hours at least).

The one issue my Tivo seems to have, and I'm hoping it is related to bad power supplies due to bad caps, is that the IR remote doesn't work after the unit has been running for a while and presumably has gotten warm. I've had to use the front panel buttons (or the various Tivo remote apps on iPhone or Android) for most things recently. Has anyone else seen the remote stop being recognized due to bad capacitors?

Thanks all! :)
 
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