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TDL shepherd
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Arris TM822 ... Is there a more specific model number, such as TM822G or TM822A/S? (The G and A/S models both supposedly have built-in MoCA filters, to protect them from live MoCA signals.)

When you say you installed MoCA splitters in place of the Regal splitters, what brand/model splitters did you use?
 

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TDL shepherd
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The modem says ARRIS TM822G
Ok, so that modem is *supposed* to have a built-in "MoCA immunity filter," per specs, so it shouldn't be affected by a MoCA network active on the coax lines.

At this point, I'd be interested in what happens to your setup if you remove the OLD MoCA filter, as well, so that you (at least temporarily) have ZERO MoCA filters installed.

If removing all MoCA filters doesn't kill your Internet connection, then I'd recommend giving your MoCA Bridge and remote MoCA connections one more try.

(Just looking to see if a MoCA connection can be established; we can worry about security and performance improvements later.)
 

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TDL shepherd
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Do you mean the old grey MoCA adapter filter I put back on?
Yes, remove it, when you can accept a brief TV signal outage while it's being removed and the coax lines reconnected -- and a possible Internet outage (though hopefully the latter will not occur). The new MoCA filter should remain unconnected, as well.

So I start thinking about that old MoCA adapter filter that I put on and I remember about three years ago, we did put a whole home DVR system in there supplied by the cable company as a free trial for thirty days but we didn't keep it because they gave us the main DVR and wanted us to lease the client DVRs. So that was probably the reason for the MoCA adapter filter and if that's the case, maybe the house is already MoCA enabled.
Your "house" wasn't MoCA-enabled, but your coax lines hanging off your 3-way splitter were. The problem is, that doesn't help you, today, because your MoCA signal is originating on the wrong side of that old grey MoCA adapter filter down the modem line, so the old MoCA adapter filter needs to be removed to allow the MoCA signals to travel from the bridging MoCA adapter over to the coax lines hanging off the 3-way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #69 ·
Oh, OK got it. I will try that first thing in the morning. It's 1 a.m. here and I'm about to go to bed. Thanks for the help. So tomorrow, get rid of the MoCA adapter and try setting it up with the bridge on the modem and the bridge at the Roamio. I will update you as soon as I got it done. Thanks.
 

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TDL shepherd
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So tomorrow, get rid of the MoCA adapter filter
Correct. Remove the old gray MoCA filter, joining the coax lines, and then check your Internet connectivity, TV picture, etc.

Once you verify that removing the MoCA filter didn't break anything, you can test your MoCA connectivity.

edit: p.s. To be as cautious as possible, you might want to power off or disconnect the MoCA bridge at the modem/router location until the old MoCA filter has been removed and Internet stability verified... and you're ready to test MoCA again.
 

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TiVoholic by the bay
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It sounds like you are making major changes on your wiring and its still causing (or creating more) issues. I would suggest changing 1 item at a time (removing a filter, or so), then test everything to see how they connect. This is "trial and error" and it can pinpoint any good or bad points.
 
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Discussion Starter · #72 ·
Correct. Remove the old gray MoCA filter, joining the coax lines, and then check your Internet connectivity, TV picture, etc.

Once you verify that removing the MoCA filter didn't break anything, you can test your MoCA connectivity.

edit: p.s. To be as cautious as possible, you might want to power off or disconnect the MoCA bridge at the modem/router location until the old MoCA filter has been removed and Internet stability verified... and you're ready to test MoCA again.
I removed the filter as suggested and I am up and running! :) Thanks for all your help, it is truly appreciated. I hope you have a wonderful holiday! :)
 

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TDL shepherd
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I removed the filter as suggested and I am up and running! :) Thanks for all your help, it is truly appreciated. I hope you have a wonderful holiday! :)
Great to hear, and you, too.

But you're not done. You don't want to be running a MoCA network without a MoCA filter in place at your PoE (like this). You could try reinstalling the new MoCA filter back on the incoming line from the provider, or give the old MoCA filter a try. Neither one should block your Internet or cable TV signals, properly installed and functioning normally. If they both do, you can remove them, temporarily and consult your cable provider for a solution. (They really *shouldn't* knock out your Internet or TV signals.)

Also, now that you have a functioning MoCA network, you can check your MoCA connection quality via the network status dialog from the Mini. (see here) This can be useful both for gauging your current connection quality and for comparison if/when you make any future changes to your components or cable tree.
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
Great to hear, and you, too.

But you're not done. You don't want to be running a MoCA network without a MoCA filter in place at your PoE (like this). You could try reinstalling the new MoCA filter back on the incoming line from the provider, or give the old MoCA filter a try. Neither one should block your Internet or cable TV signals, properly installed and functioning normally. If they both do, you can remove them, temporarily and consult your cable provider for a solution. (They really *shouldn't* knock out your Internet or TV signals.)

Also, now that you have a functioning MoCA network, you can check your MoCA connection quality via the network status dialog from the Mini. (see here) This can be useful both for gauging your current connection quality and for comparison if/when you make any future changes to your components or cable tree.
 

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TDL shepherd
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Thanks, I'm visiting family today, but I'll put the filter back on tomorrow . What about the internal modem POE? Does it not do the same thing?
This is why I loathe referring to these things as "PoE filters," rather than "MoCA filters."

Yes, the modem has an an internal MoCA filter. And you need a MoCA filter installed at the point-of-entry (PoE) to your home. They perform identical functions but for different purposes.

The "PoE" MoCA filter blocks your MoCA signals from leaving your home, external MoCA signals from seeping onto your coax lines, and improves performance by efficiently reflecting your MoCA signals back onto your coax lines. The key being that this MoCA filter is installed at your PoE.

The protective/prophylactic MoCA filter built-in to your cable modem is simply there to prevent MoCA signals, if present on the coax lines, from interfering with the modem's operation. Similar to the built-in MoCA filter in your TM822G modem, many cable customers whose providers require tuning adapters paired with their TiVos to tune Switched Digital Video (SDV) programming find that they need to install a protective MoCA filter on the input to each tuning adapter to protect the tuning adapter from MoCA signal interference (owing to the tuning adapters NOT having built-in MoCA filters).
 
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