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· Cord Cutter
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Yes. And Big 10 college football, which will be spread between CBS, NBC and Fox (as well as cable and streaming) under the next contract. (Looks like SEC football is leaving CBS and going all-in at ESPN after this season.)
I think these cable deals are at the leagues' own peril. A lot of people will just stop watching. It's going to be a big moneymaker for sports bars though.

They're giving up a bit of control but, especially in the case of ad-supported content, it's all about maximizing viewership (and therefore ad impressions, and therefore ad revenue). So as long as Google is allowing the source app's A/V stream to pass through unmolested (e.g. Google is not trying to insert their own ads) -- and I do believe that's the case with their Live Channels app -- then IMO those third-party apps have more to gain than lose by participating.
Other than sporting events that people already know that they want to watch, does anyone actually care about live anymore?
 

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Other than sporting events that people already know that they want to watch, does anyone actually care about live anymore?
The generic answer is "event television" (verbized as "eventize"), which includes live sports, and breaking news, award presentations, and a few very specific showings (such as "The Day of the Doctor", simulcast across much of the world).

On the other hand, I know of people who record sports to skip through the "boring" parts, which for some sports may be most of it (".... and because we've got soccer highlights, the sheer pointlessness of a zero-zero tie ....")
 

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Other than sporting events that people already know that they want to watch, does anyone actually care about live anymore?
I think there's more to the appeal of linear channels than just the tentpole live sports content. Some folks simply like flipping through pre-programmed content streams, i.e. "Play something for me." It's a different way to access content versus scrolling through long grids of on-demand content posters. Linear channels get you into content quickly and with zero "commitment." It's a good way for programmers to advertise their stuff and a convenient way for viewers to sample it. So even after Boomers and Xers are gone, I'm not sure that linear channels will be. I just think that, for the most part, their future lies inside FAST apps like Pluto TV, Tubi, Xumo, etc. As I've said before, I believe that by the end of this decade, the major broadcast networks -- ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox -- will exist as free live stream linear channels inside those companies' FAST apps (but with most of their live sports blacked out from those free streams).
 

· Cord Cutter
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The generic answer is "event television" (verbized as "eventize"), which includes live sports, and breaking news, award presentations, and a few very specific showings (such as "The Day of the Doctor", simulcast across much of the world).
I don't see that being successful at large scale outside of sports and news, the two remaining pillars of live TV.

I think there's more to the appeal of linear channels than just the tentpole live sports content. Some folks simply like flipping through pre-programmed content streams, i.e. "Play something for me." It's a different way to access content versus scrolling through long grids of on-demand content posters. Linear channels get you into content quickly and with zero "commitment." It's a good way for programmers to advertise their stuff and a convenient way for viewers to sample it. So even after Boomers and Xers are gone, I'm not sure that linear channels will be. I just think that, for the most part, their future lies inside FAST apps like Pluto TV, Tubi, Xumo, etc. As I've said before, I believe that by the end of this decade, the major broadcast networks -- ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox -- will exist as free live stream linear channels inside those companies' FAST apps (but with most of their live sports blacked out from those free streams).
I think Netflix has basically overcome the desire to have something on, and there's no reason that they couldn't make it even easier with a customized feed that starts automatically based on your recommendations, making the concept of live TV outside of live events totally obsolete.

I think there will be some semblance of live TV probably forever, even if just a few sports and news channels to have in hotels and bars and such, but I really doubt that they will comprise any significant part of video viewership in the future.
 

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The generic answer is "event television" (verbized as "eventize"), which includes live sports, and breaking news, award presentations, and a few very specific showings (such as "The Day of the Doctor", simulcast across much of the world).

On the other hand, I know of people who record sports to skip through the "boring" parts, which for some sports may be most of it (".... and because we've got soccer highlights, the sheer pointlessness of a zero-zero tie ....")
That's me. Since back in the 80s I've been time shifting my TV watching. There is nothing I want to watch live. At least not if there are any commercials included.
 

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I think Netflix has basically overcome the desire to have something on, and there's no reason that they couldn't make it even easier with a customized feed that starts automatically based on your recommendations, making the concept of live TV outside of live events totally obsolete.
Maybe. Although I think there's a social aspect (whether conscious or unconscious) about linear channels too, in knowing that you're watching the same thing at the same time as many others across the land. But yeah, we might also see customized auto-playing feeds that mimic linear channels. I believe Netflix experimented with such a feature in France, although I don't think they stuck with it.
 

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Maybe. Although I think there's a social aspect (whether conscious or unconscious) about linear channels too, in knowing that you're watching the same thing at the same time as many others across the land. But yeah, we might also see customized auto-playing feeds that mimic linear channels. I believe Netflix experimented with such a feature in France, although I don't think they stuck with it.
I think there is a social aspect with live events, but not with re-runs or something. If it were a scheduled premiere that's appointment viewing with the streaming available afterwards, sure, but that sorts of upends the whole Netflix model.
 

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I didn't realize this until this weekend, but the FCC requirement for a digital tuner means that manufacturers can still produce sets with legacy ATSC 1.0 and leave out the ATSC 3.0 tuner.

Granted, the number of people getting their content over-the-air, much less from an ATSC 3.0 signal may be small, but now I am wondering if ATSC 3.0 will be voluntarily included, soon.

I gather that not all new TVs been sold, currently, have ATSC 3.0.

 

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Granted, the number of people getting their content over-the-air, much less from an ATSC 3.0 signal may be small, but now I am wondering if ATSC 3.0 will be voluntarily included, soon.

I gather that not all new TVs been sold, currently, have ATSC 3.0.
All new Sony's TVs do.

"... Sony is bringing ATSC 3.0 to every TV range announced so far in 2022, following on from considerable support last year. ..."
Best TVs with ATSC 3.0 tuners | Tom's Guide (tomsguide.com)

Is "NextGen/ATSC 3.0" coming to 'race to the bottom' $100-250 TVs soon? No.
Is "NextGen" going to be rare for > $1,000 TVs in 2023? Probably not.

at the moment, about 25 core models (with different screens) listed here
Shop Devices | Watch NextGenTV


There isn't going to be a mandate to turn off ATSC 1.0 any time in the immediate future. Pragmatically, would need near universal home internet service to go along with it. So it will probably grow organically for several more years. But less wealthy and/or under-served areas probably won't get it for a long time.
 

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There isn't going to be a mandate to turn off ATSC 1.0 any time in the immediate future. Pragmatically, would need near universal home internet service to go along with it. So it will probably grow organically for several more years. But less wealthy and/or under-served areas probably won't get it for a long time.
I wouldn't be so sure. Poorer markets may have higher OTA adoption. Around here, the rich exurbs seem to get technology last.
 

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From AVS Forum ATSC 3.0 discussion:

I have gotten word WXII has added DNR (Do Not Record) protection on their ATSC3.0 signal and it has caused some TVs to stop decoding WXII 3.0.It is not suppose to do that, only to prevent recording and not lock out the signal all together. They are aware of it and are working on finding out what the issue is. Currently, they are the only station with DNR installed. The Samsung we use here at the station is decoding but some Sony's are not. My HDHomeRun Flex4k is not decoding it either.

Just so you know.
WXII is the NBC affiliate for Greensboro/High Point/Winston-Salem, NC market.

FYI
 

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For most stations, ATSC 3.0 is still considered in the "testing" phases of deployment, and I expected more stations to have experimented with various content protection flagging to understand how it will all work than we have seen to this point.

Note that in order to display protected content not only do the receivers/tuners have to support ATSC 3.0 itself, but also the full A3SA (content protection) component (they have to be adopters, and obtain security certificates and keys after device certifications/validations[0]), and have an ability to acquire the needed content licenses (in some cases, perhaps, via a USB stick, but I believe it was sort of envisioned it would be done via access to the Internet from your TV in most cases).

I would expect the major vendors (LG, Samsung, Sony) to update their TV's firmware if needed, but such updates are not always quick.



[0] One might remember that the new Tablo ATSC 3.0 tuner/recorder is delayed (was originally due to ship spring 2022, now, maybe, early 2023 (they are no longer providing target dates)) due to the entire process of obtaining the needed validations for content protection recording (a big embarrassment on their part for not understanding the entire set of requirements during their initial development, but at least they caught it before devices that might not have worked in the future were in the hands of their customers, and they would have had to do a mass replacement).
 

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Please see new information ...
This is mostly consistent with the known fact that SiliconDust's ATSC 3.0 tuner has been stated by SiliconDust to not support A3SA content protection at this time (so decoding of the stream is not possible).

SiliconDust has stated it is their goal to support A3SA content protection at some point in the future.
 

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College football has mostly moved to streaming and I see NFL going in the same direction. Within a few years NFL games on networks will be a rare event. Even the college bowl games have completely moved off the networks.
 

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College football has mostly moved to streaming and I see NFL going in the same direction. Within a few years NFL games on networks will be a rare event. Even the college bowl games have completely moved off the networks.
The major networks contracts with the NFL continue through the 2033 season, which I would not consider to be "within a few years".

By the time of the follow-on contract negotiations begin (a few years before 2033) it will probably be clearer from whom the NFL believes it can collect the most money (networks, streaming services, DTC) and how to structure any deal to achieve that goal.
 

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Well that shouldn't exist. I thought we defeated that crap back in the dawn of ATSC 1.0? :mad:
Yes, the "primary" sub-channel on a station must be FTA (per the FCC's requirements for a broadcast license). Beyond that, there are no requirements (just like the primary sub-channel must be MPEG-2, but the other sub-channels can be something else, even if some TV's cannot decode it). And with ATSC 3.0, not only can there be multiple sub-channels, there can also be multiple PLPs carrying the same channel (in various formats), so a station that might eventually choose to offer the 4K variant with a requirement for a subscription license could do so, as long as the "primary" version (let us say the sub-HD version) was not protected. And if they offered "HBO" on a different sub-channel which required a license, they could also do so (and such concepts were strongly considered as a viable plan during the initial design phases). Of course, that was before the US government decided to spend your tax dollars to deploy high speed Internet everywhere where it had previously been unavailable and where some OTA stations saw a viable business opportunity. So much for that business plan. And, of course, with most ATSC 3.0 transmitters currently being lighthouses (shared by many different stations for testing/development), the "primary" sub-channel is mostly irrelevant.
 
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