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WPIX is offered on some cable packages across the US and CA. Back in the 80’s/90’s is was marketed as a nationwide “superstation”.

I suspect now it’s NYC roots keep it of interest to many.
I thought the whole superstation concept went away because local channels fought that, so stations like WPIX would no longer be brought in. When I lived in AZ, we had WTBS out of Atlanta, WGN out of Chicago, and WOR out of NY. When the Superstations went away, both WTBS and WGN mophed into basic cable channels nationally, and WOR went away.
 

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I think the final season of The Flash is still a go. I assume Stargirl is too. Those are the only two CW shows left that I'll watch. I used to watch a lot of CW content. I have less than 0% interest in unscripted reality shows so CW will soon be dead to me. I'm guessing it'll become like SyFy to me - completely forgettable.
"The Flash" I will watch, even though as entertainment it has gone way downhill for me. I gave up on superhero shows except for "Superman & Lois", which has been mostly terrible to me despite how much I like the main characters.

If "Whose Line" ever has any new episodes I plan to watch. I recorded "Would I Lie to You" but I just don't know.

I recorded "All American" but after my Roamio mysteriously deleted a bunch of them, I'm waiting until I can see the ones I missed before I watch any others.

There's also "Penn & Teller". There's another magic show but that one makes no attempt, to my knowledge, to explain how the tricks were done. If I could speak code, I'd understand how some of the tricks were done on "Penn & Teller".
 

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Honestly, I did not know that. You'd never have guessed when looking at the channel lineup I have because they aren't bundled with the other broadcast networks. Heck, I only know of the one CW station on my channel lineup and it's New York - you'd think the one closer to me (Seattle, say) would be far better known.
CW was a merger of two fledgling broadcast networks: WB and UPN, owned by Warner Brothers and Paramount respectively. When they merged in markets that had both WB and UPN stations one usually became CW and the other some independent station.

As such CW became the place WB and CBS/Paramount dumped shows they produced that didn’t get good ratings, but it didn’t matter since they owned the stations.
 

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"The Flash" I will watch, even though as entertainment it has gone way downhill for me. I gave up on superhero shows except for "Superman & Lois", which has been mostly terrible to me despite how much I like the main characters.
I gave up on The Flash after 4 seasons. I tried going back after a while, but only managed like 3 episodes of Season 5 before I gave up again.

I like Superman & Lois well enough. But I had surgery this year around the same time Season 2 started, and totally forgot about it. It's recorded, just never got around to watching. I probably will at some point.

Saw on Twitter last week that Jordan Elsass, who plays Jonathan, notified the studio that he wouldn't be returning. So the role is being recast for Season 3.
 

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The title of that article says "average viewer" but then lists stats showing the median. I hated statistics class, and admittedly have forgotten most of it, but even I know the difference between mean and median, and the two are not interchangeable. Would be interesting to know the actual average. Even the mode.
My memory is that "average" is a general term that could be mean, median, or mode.

Edit: No, that's not right.
 

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My memory is that "average" is a general term that could be mean, median, or mode.
Not to be mean, but the average is the mean and not the other two. :)

To be fair, most people don't know that. I probably only remember because I retook statistics for a mid-career evening MBA.
 
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Why not? Why don't you think they can do it? Cutting costs and moving toward more profitable programming is a good start. We've seen hundreds of companies turn things around in that short of time.
Most businesses can't do any heavy lifting within a couple of years, things don't move that fast without spending even more money (which is strange if you're trying to save it).
 

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I thought the whole superstation concept went away because local channels fought that, so stations like WPIX would no longer be brought in. When I lived in AZ, we had WTBS out of Atlanta, WGN out of Chicago, and WOR out of NY. When the Superstations went away, both WTBS and WGN mophed into basic cable channels nationally, and WOR went away.
Because those Superstations were already approved for carriage by the Canadian cable companies, they continued to be offered in Canada even after they switched from the Superstation concept. Oddly, when WGN and WTBS split their local and national feeds in the US, we kept getting their local versions in Canada (WTBS became Peachtree TV) rather than NewsNation and TBS because it was the local stations that were approved to be carried.

In the UPN and WB days, WSBK out of Boston was available as a UPN affiliate and KTLA, WGN, and WPIX were all WB affiliates available as Superstations in Canada (at least where I live). After the switch to the CW, WSBK switched to MyTV and WGN has since dropped The CW, but KTLA and WPIX are both still available CW affiliates.

My cable provider also carries the Seattle CW affiliate as part of its basic US channel package along with the other Seattle network stations, but it's not a Superstation.
 

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CW was a merger of two fledgling broadcast networks: WB and UPN, owned by Warner Brothers and Paramount respectively. When they merged in markets that had both WB and UPN stations one usually became CW and the other some independent station.

As such CW became the place WB and CBS/Paramount dumped shows they produced that didn’t get good ratings, but it didn’t matter since they owned the stations.
Yeah. A lot of people aren’t aware of that history and that the CW was never intended to make money. Now that it has to stand on its own, profitability is paramount; hence the changes that are forthcoming.
 

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Discussion Starter · #91 ·
As such CW became the place WB and CBS/Paramount dumped shows they produced that didn’t get good ratings, but it didn’t matter since they owned the stations.
Complete and total nonsense. CBS only owns a very small number of CW stations, 8 to be specific. [1] All the rest are affiliates. (This is similar to how all television networks in the US are. ABC currently has 8 "owned and operated" stations, NBC has 12, CBS has 15, and FOX has 18.)

In fact, that's whole reason that Nexstar is buying the CW... they are, if memory serves, the second largest affiliate of the CW (I believe Sinclair has slightly more CW stations), and Nexstar wanted to buy the CW to make sure it continued to operate, so their stations would continue to have programming.

[1] This is down slightly from when The CW launched. At that time, they had 11 "owned and operated" CW stations.
 

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Complete and total nonsense. CBS only owns a very small number of CW stations, 8 to be specific. [1] All the rest are affiliates. (This is similar to how all television networks in the US are. ABC currently has 8 "owned and operated" stations, NBC has 12, CBS has 15, and FOX has 18.)
Semantics. Owned or affiliate it didn’t matter. CBS/WB told the stations they were airing their produced shows so they did. That’s the main reason the CW existed.


Before anyone gets defensive, one should note that having no financial stake doesn’t mean the network doesn’t care about what makes it to air. Rather, it cares very much, but in a different way. As mentioned many times before, it wasn’t too long ago – 2013 in fact – CBS Corporation president Leslie Moonves stated, “The CW as an entity may lose some money. However, CW is owned by two companies that produce the shows. The shows bring us more revenue than the losses do. So it’s still valuable, and there’s still a marketplace for it.” What Moonves refers to is the idea of The CW being a co-owned venture by that of CBS and Warner Bros. (the two networks were famously brought together in 2006 to solve the dilemma of the failing WB and UPN networks). Why does all of this minutia matter? Because it ties directly into what the true purpose of The CW is.

Unlike the big four of CBS, ABC, NBC and Fox, The CW is not a network trying to make money on a grand scale off its live viewership. Rather, it was created as a vessel for 1st-run domestic broadcast. Why is that important? Because without somewhere to air first, there’s no way for television studios to achieve the syndication friendly number of 88-episodes necessary for profitable 2nd-tier syndication deals. The CW is a network created with the singular goal of getting the shows of its parent company to syndication qualifying numbers. That’s why most of its programming still runs traditional 22-episode seasons and why there’s never been outside programming from the likes of 20th Century Fox, NBCUniversal and ABC Studios featured on it.

Live viewership matters very little to a network like The CW because that same network is paying very little in licensing fees. To put it in broad terms, selling a show to The CW is similar to just moving money from one's left hand to the right. If the shows are creating buzz and next day viewership, that’s a gain for everyone because it says to after-market and international broadcasters, “people are going to watch this show anywhere they can. It behooves you to take it on for your day-time programming slate.” Warner Bros. and CBS are paying to keep afloat a vessel for its off-beat programming that won’t do well with live viewers on traditional networks like CBS that do rely on live ratings to cover licensing costs. We all love The Flash, but The Flash would flounder on the likes of NBC, just as Constantine did before it.
 

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Complete and total nonsense. CBS only owns a very small number of CW stations, 8 to be specific. [1] All the rest are affiliates. (This is similar to how all television networks in the US are. ABC currently has 8 "owned and operated" stations, NBC has 12, CBS has 15, and FOX has 18.)

In fact, that's whole reason that Nexstar is buying the CW... they are, if memory serves, the second largest affiliate of the CW (I believe Sinclair has slightly more CW stations), and Nexstar wanted to buy the CW to make sure it continued to operate, so their stations would continue to have programming.

[1] This is down slightly from when The CW launched. At that time, they had 11 "owned and operated" CW stations.
I believe Nexstar had the most after they bought Tribune. It does make it odd in markets where Nexstar owns other stations though. Obviously the majority of stations have always been affiliates and not owned & operated, but the networks didn’t own competing affiliates. In Columbus, Nexstar owns the NBC, and Sinclair has the CW (& ABC & Fox).
 

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Discussion Starter · #94 ·
Semantics. Owned or affiliate it didn’t matter. CBS/WB told the stations they were airing their produced shows so they did. That’s the main reason the CW existed.

I guess I'm not seeing how The CW is much different than how ABC, NBC, or CBS are these days on any of those factors.

If you look up and down the schedule on all the broadcast networks, they're all vastly made by their own studios. Networks give renewals to marginal shows that are from their own studios, because they know they likely can make money again from them in streaming and syndication, and will be very quick to cancel third-party shows.
 
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