TiVo Community Forum banner
1 - 20 of 181 Posts

·
Nice to see you
Joined
·
9,682 Posts
The light actually used to be a bit more visible with some previous designs of the contestant podiums.

Something you don't get to see on TV, but that's very visible from the studio audience, is the light tube that goes all the way around the game board. It's turned on along with the buzzer circuitry when Alex finishes reading each clue, and then goes off when a contestant buzzes in -- many times, the contestants are fast enough that it just barely flickers.
 

·
Nice to see you
Joined
·
9,682 Posts
Some markets get both a new episode and a one-year-old rerun -- Waldorf may have been "fooled" by the rerun, which would explain why he was talking about a different episode than waynomo. (As far as I know, the new episode always airs later in the day than the rerun.)
 

·
Nice to see you
Joined
·
9,682 Posts
My understanding is that they're not "consultants" in the sense that they're helping the contestants with their wagering. They're just members of the production staff who are making sure that the wagers the contestants come up with make sense and are written legibly on the screen.
 

·
Nice to see you
Joined
·
9,682 Posts
If you're nervous and have only 30 seconds[*] to write something, I have a feeling that underlining it would be the last thing on your mind. :D

I have occasionally seen underlining (or putting movie/TV titles in quotes), but I can't point to specific examples -- you're right that it's very rare. I don't think there's a specific rule against it, though.

[*] The contestants actually have a little longer than 30 seconds, because the pen starts working once the clue is displayed, not when the music starts. Also, they're told to write either "who" or "what" during the commercial break (and it's not ruled wrong if they forget the "is" or "are").
 

·
Nice to see you
Joined
·
9,682 Posts
Still, for clarity sake, the answer would have been better worded "It is the game that launched a best-selling franchise whose title princess was named for F. Scott Fitzgerald's wife."
I don't like "franchise whose," since a franchise isn't a "who." But more importantly, that "it is" at the beginning isn't how they write "Jeopardy!" clues; their standard style would be more like "This game, which launched a best-selling franchise, featured a title princess named for F. Scott Fitzgerald's wife."

But I feel like that's a bit more awkward than the original -- "The title princess of this game, which launched a best-selling franchise, was named for F. Scott Fitzgerald's wife" -- mainly because she was the title princess, so of course she was "featured."

I also want to note that without having to come up with the title of the game, the question becomes "name F. Scott Fitzgerald's wife," which isn't Final Jeopardy!-level information, it's more like top-to-middle-board in the first round.
 

·
Nice to see you
Joined
·
9,682 Posts
I've always wondered if it matters if the "question" answer makes any sense, just as long as you answer in the form of a question.
Very little of the original 1960s/1970s run of "Jeopardy!" survives, but they did save a clip from a celebrity match in which Gene Shalit buzzes in and answers "the NBC peacock," gets reminded by Art Fleming to phrase it in the form of a question, and then says, "Has anyone around here seen the NBC peacock?" He's counted correct.

The contestant who was recently an 8-day champ answered most questions involving place names as "where is ______?", even though the clue wording almost always calls for a "what is ______?" (In the sense that "this U.S. state's capital is Sacramento," for example, elicits a "what.")
 

·
Nice to see you
Joined
·
9,682 Posts
We'll need Trainman to answer that. Even though he claims he's in his 30's, he seems to know an awful lot about Jeopardy from 40 years ago.
My mother watched the original version while I was in the womb.

I think waynomo's memory is a little fuzzy -- as far as I know, the "last name acceptance" rule has always been the same.
 

·
Nice to see you
Joined
·
9,682 Posts
I think that's how they do it though, since the winner gets to come back the next game.
Right -- the minimum prize for first place is $1, and since they'll come back on the next show, they're guaranteed to go home with at least $1,001.

(If a game ends in a 3-way tie for $0, none of the contestants get to come back for the next show, and I don't know how they handle the minimum guarantee amounts in that case.)
 

·
Nice to see you
Joined
·
9,682 Posts
Just watched an interview with Chu. I've never understood why most people just go down the board in order. If there is a subject you know about why not go for the highest value first and work your way down in value? If you can get a few of those high dollar clues under your belt you can be less risky on the lower value clues in categories you aren't familiar with.
It's not always obvious what the category is "really" about based on the category title. Also, sometimes there's a "trick" to the category that only becomes obvious after 1 or 2 of the clues have been revealed. In that case, it would be better to "waste" the lower-value clues rather than start at the bottom with the high-value clues.

I'm not saying Arthur Chu is doing something wrong, though -- you can't argue with results.
 

·
Nice to see you
Joined
·
9,682 Posts
Wish they would show the light.

Do we know why they don't show it?
Because at the point it turns on, they've already cut from the full-screen clue to the camera shot of the contestants, so you can see who rings in. They'd have to go to a wide shot of the game board to show the light.

In many cases, as I've seen when I've been in the audience for tapings, it barely flickers -- it turns off when someone rings in, and someone often rings in within tenths of a second.
 

·
Nice to see you
Joined
·
9,682 Posts
"Concentration" was another one I liked; the 1970s version was the one I grew up with, but like a lot of shows of the era, the original videotapes are gone.
Rumor has it that most if not all of the 1970s version of "Concentration" does survive (the 1980s "Classic Concentration" with Alex Trebek is definitely still around) -- but "Concentration" has never shown up on Game Show Network because, since NBC holds the rights, it's never been part of GSN's licensing of various Goodson-Todman-produced content.
 

·
Nice to see you
Joined
·
9,682 Posts
Is it me or are they moving the Daily Doubles around now that everyone has adopted the Arthur Chu method of high value board jumping? I mean, it seems like the daily double was hidden near the very end.
Even Arthur Chu will tell you that it's really the Chuck Forrest method of board jumping.

I haven't noticed any difference in Daily Double hiding places -- i.e., more often than not, they're in the 3rd or 4th row, in a non-pop culture, non-wordplay category. I think whatever you're seeing is a coincidence.

I don't think the current champion Julia's been jumping around the board all that much, so I think it's a little inaccurate to say that everyone has adopted the strategy. (Also, I believe her episodes were taped before Arthur's aired.)
 

·
Nice to see you
Joined
·
9,682 Posts
Jeopardy (syndicated) along with Wheel of Fortune are quite special - they were among the first game shows to run in a prime time TV slot.
You're about 35 years too late there -- the networks had prime-time game shows going back to the earliest days of television broadcasting.

Even if you're only thinking of the 7:00/7:30 time slot, syndicated game shows became a very common occupant of that slot once the FCC instituted the Prime Time Access Rule in the early 1970s.
 

·
Nice to see you
Joined
·
9,682 Posts
Back then didn't prime time start at 7:30?
The networks started their prime-time programming at 7:30 (Eastern) until the FCC passed the aforementioned Prime Time Access Rule, which limited them to 3 hours of regularly scheduled prime-time programming each night (4 hours on either Saturday or Sunday) -- and in addition, network affiliates in the top 25 markets were prevented from airing reruns of network shows at 7:30.

The FCC's hope was that the affiliates would use their extra half-hour for locally originated programming and other uplifting entertainment, but instead, pretty much everyone opted for first-run syndicated programming of some sort.
 
1 - 20 of 181 Posts
Top