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Curiously Strong
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With a suppressed rising inflection, to indicate irony. Apparently he planned the whole convoluted scheme. I would have thought there would be far easier and more reliable ways to kill the cosmonaut.
Seems like it was a pretty good way to do it without a physical confrontation.
 

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Curiously Strong
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Plus Margo's career probably over. I doubt NASA can afford to keep her in place after she ordered the astronauts to let Molly die, and they were able to rescue her anyway.
Which is dumb, because Margo made the 100% right call.

Molly should have vented her suit to remove the need for the other crew members to risk their lives to save her.
 

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Curiously Strong
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Although the writers wanted to have it both ways...it was kind of a cop-out to have her make the right call, and then be proven wrong (she didn't say they probably couldn't rescue Molly; she said they definitely couldn't). The way it looks now, she was just plain wrong. And given what a genius she's been portrayed as being in orbital mechanics etc., having her be "wrong" seems, well, wrong. She calculated the Cold Equations, and she should have been proven right.
And right before she made the call, flight dynamics said that there were no trajectories that conserved enough fuel (due to uncertainty in Molly's trajectory).
 

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Curiously Strong
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I do question the usefulness of a dosimeter that is only capable of indicating “anywhere from no radiation to just shy of enough to kill you” and “already dead.”
 

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Curiously Strong
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Season 2, Episode 2:

The dosimeters still don’t make sense.

And why the heck is Ed sending Gordo back? He has to know that’ll be a disaster.
 

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Curiously Strong
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I saw Charlie Schlatter's name in the credits. IMDB lists the character as Paul Michaels, but I don't know who that is within the show. Anyone know? I had no idea he was still an actor. I hadn't seen his name in anything since the 80's or 90's.
He's one of the news anchors.
 
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Curiously Strong
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I just want to complain about how useless the missiles on Pathfinder are. Just a 100nm range? They’d only only work for things in the same orbit as Pathfinder. And if you blow up something in the same orbit, congratulations, you’re now in orbit with a bunch of debris.

It would make much more sense to have a ground-based system. In real life, the US started testing an anti-satellite missile that could be launched from an F-15 in 1984. Something like that would be so much more flexible than arming Pathfinder.
 

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Curiously Strong
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Two details that the geek in me would have wanted to see (a) where do they hide all the extra fuel for TLI and TEI? and (b) How do they handle thermal management in flight (the one shot we've seen of a shuttle in cruise had the main doors closed; our shuttle has a short operational window with the doors closed before it starts to overheat, there are radiators as part of the door assembly)
Also, the Shuttle was limited in acceptable beta angles. It was pretty dependant on being in shade for a good portion of the orbit. Being in sun for the whole 3-day trip to the moon would make for a very harsh thermal environment.[/QUOTE]
 

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Curiously Strong
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They at least showed some extra tankage once, when Contiki was docked with Skylab (in what otherwise seemed like a throwaway scene): the rear half of the payload bay was filled with tanks.

Going by my delta V cheat sheet, from LEO to Moon orbit is around 4 km/s to a decent low lunar orbit, to around 1.5 to get back if you've got a decent reentry system to handle the high speed entry. I have a feeling that's more dV than you could fit in what they showed in Contiki, but at least they showed something
If I'm doing the math right, if you used the entire payload capacity of the Shuttle for extra propellant for the OMS, you'd still be short by about 5,000 lbs of the needed propellant to get to the moon and back. And that's not even county the weight of the tanks and plumbing.

Like you say, a fuel depot would be the only real way to pull this off. The Shuttle going to the moon would have to get to orbit and keep its external tank attached, refuel the ET, then take the ET with it all the way to the moon.

Seems like it'd be much more efficient to simply have a dedicated LEO/LLO transfer vehicle that the Shuttle docks with in LEO.
 
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Curiously Strong
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But telling Ed about it on his way out the door to a very dangerous mission was an enormous regression for her. Ed is a serial narcissist and not blameless for what she feels is a problem in their marriage, but telling him just then was a real heel turn. Not only did she tell him, she clearly wanted him to know, and not just to know, but to know she did it with malice aforethought and she's not sorry. Jiminy.
I totally disagree. It seems like she's standing up for herself. Ed was oblivious to the torture she went through as he was out risking his life (putting himself on a mission after she thought he was going to stay in a desk job, and especially the completely unnecessary T-38 dogfight). The fact that Pathfinder's mission had been pushed up just put her over the edge, and she wanted Ed to know that her life wasn't going to revolve around him anymore. Waiting to tell him would just mean that, once again, Ed's desires come before hers. She was sick of it.
 

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Curiously Strong
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I get that, but there's more at stake then just her (and Ed's) feelings. She's jeopardizing a critical mission in the middle of a potentially nuclear confrontation. And she strikes me as having been written as the kind of person who would get that.
She doesn't know what Pathfinder is doing. There's no indication she knows what's going on on the Moon. It's a test flight, as far as she knows. But even if she did know everything, I still wouldn't hold it against her. Ed's male fragility is not more important than her.
 

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Curiously Strong
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Doesn't really matter...at that point, the two sides were basically at war, and the Americans should never have left such important materials (i.e., the suits) alone with the Soviets.
They likely have spares. There were only a few suits in the airlock.
 

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Curiously Strong
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I didn’t get the sense the Soviets have anything on Margo, other than her relationship with Sergei. They’re just going to use that relationship to their advantage, without her being aware she’s an intelligence asset.
 

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Curiously Strong
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And yes, the acceleration issues for a woman in a difficult pregnancy is too much to be believed, even with the reduced gravity of Mars. But I presume when the 4th season arrives we'll get a look forward on how the Mars colony has survived!
Thanks to Mars’ lower gravity (and hence lower orbital velocity), ascent to low Martian orbit is downright leisurely compared to Earth. Ascent acceleration could be lower than 1 Earth g.
 
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Curiously Strong
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What Kelly did is essentially the same thing that Mark Watney did in The Martian, except Kelly actually had more equipment. In the latter movie, Watney broke ribs and blacked out from the g-forces during the ascent. Serious question: which version is closer to reality? Or is the difference because Watney was traveling faster (“fastest man in the history of space travel”)?
As I recall in The Martian, Hermes was making a high-speed flyby of Mars. It wasn’t in orbit. So he had to accelerate to greater than Mars’ escape velocity, not just orbital velocity.
 
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