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Echanging S-Cards for M-Cards in My Tivos

2520 Views 17 Replies 11 Participants Last post by  classicsat
My Cable company now has M-Cards for TiVos. I am exchanging them. They charge $5 each, but counts a free cable box. My two TiVo HDs use four S-Cards and I am charged $15 a month. If go to M-Card it will cost me only $5 a month.

Is there anything I need to be alert for when I change from 2 cards to 1 in each TiVo.

Should the installer just take out the two S-Cards and replace them with a M-Card, then just go throught the regular setup?
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You should be able to swap them with no problems. Setup should be the same, except you don't need to pair two cards, just one.
They charge $5 each, but counts a free cable box.
That's a complete ripoff, particularly since they aren't supplying a tuner (you are). $2/month/receiver is reasonable.

FWIW, just as a datapoint, at least one cable provider charges $52 for an unreturned cable card... at your rate that's a ten month rental payback
This is Alaska, everything is more expensive here. My cable company is the only one in the state. They bought up all the other cable companies.

The only other alternative is satellite, but thats not the best. The satellite is so low in the sky many places can't get a good signal because of trees, buildings or mountains. I wish somebody could figure out how to launch a commo satellite in a geo-synchronous polar orbit over the North Pole--probably impossible. Even with that, I probably jump to DirectTV if they got a TiVo box. They only require one dish, DishTV needs two dishes to get HD signals. Also both need a meter dish here.

The best I can do is reduce the number of cards from 4 to 2. One free and the other $5 per month. That will save me $10 per month. Before I talked them into counting one CableCARD as the free converter box, it was $20 a month for them. So $5 a month is a deal here. They have only recently started installing M-Cards.
My Cable company now has M-Cards for TiVos. I am exchanging them. They charge $5 each, but counts a free cable box. My two TiVo HDs use four S-Cards and I am charged $15 a month. If go to M-Card it will cost me only $5 a month.

Is there anything I need to be alert for when I change from 2 cards to 1 in each TiVo.
Just one possible caveat, here. Do you have an original S3 - the one with the glo-remote and the OLED display? If so, I'm afraid you are stuck with 2 CableCards. Otherwise, 1 M-card will replace 2 S-cards.
Both are TiVo HDs, so there is no problem using M-Cards instead of S-Cards. My cable company just hasn't been installing M-Cards until recently.
This is Alaska, everything is more expensive here. My cable company is the only one in the state. They bought up all the other cable companies.

The only other alternative is satellite, but thats not the best. The satellite is so low in the sky many places can't get a good signal because of trees, buildings or mountains. I wish somebody could figure out how to launch a commo satellite in a geo-synchronous polar orbit over the North Pole--probably impossible. Even with that, I probably jump to DirectTV if they got a TiVo box. They only require one dish, DishTV needs two dishes to get HD signals. Also both need a meter dish here.

The best I can do is reduce the number of cards from 4 to 2. One free and the other $5 per month. That will save me $10 per month. Before I talked them into counting one CableCARD as the free converter box, it was $20 a month for them. So $5 a month is a deal here. They have only recently started installing M-Cards.
That isn't too bad. I have fiOS and they charge $3.99 for each cable card, whether the first or the fifth. I have five of them so I pay $19.95 each month for them. I certainly wish they charged no more than half that.
I had a Series 3 with an M Card and now just purchased a Series 4 (Premiere). Anyone know if I can just swap the card or does the cable company need to do something?
Thanks
I had a Series 3 with an M Card and now just purchased a Series 4 (Premiere). Anyone know if I can just swap the card or does the cable company need to do something?
Thanks
Depends on the cable company, but probably not. If your cable company pairs the cards, it will probably eventually need to re-pair the cable card.
Follow up on Exchanging CableCARDs--

The cable guy arrived yesterday and removed the four old S-Cards and replaced them with two M-Cards in my two Tivo HDs. No problems at all with the pairing.

When I turned on the TiVo and TV this morning for my news program, there was a message that I had new CableCARDS and that I needed to repeat guided setup. It took about 30 minutes of mostly waiting on one TiVo and I didn't have time to it on the other one. I don't think that'll be a problem either--just the time involved while it does its thing.
More follow up on Exchanging CableCARDs--

The second TiVo did not make me repeat the Guided Setup routine, like the first one did, yet.
Did you have to pay for a truck roll?
No charge of the truck roll.
And here I have been complaining about Charter in my area charging $2 for each card, when it used to be $1.50 per card.
I wish somebody could figure out how to launch a commo satellite in a geo-synchronous polar orbit over the North Pole--probably impossible.
Yeah, impossible.

Geosynchronous satellites don't really hover - they just orbit above the equator at a distance that makes the orbital period equal 24 hours.

They could put satellites into polar orbit but they'd move relative to the receiving antenna, and you'd need a bunch to get coverage all day long.
Yeah, impossible.

Geosynchronous satellites don't really hover - they just orbit above the equator at a distance that makes the orbital period equal 24 hours.

They could put satellites into polar orbit but they'd move relative to the receiving antenna, and you'd need a bunch to get coverage all day long.
Yeah, at least 3, plus the antennas would have to have a tracking mechanism that allowed the antenna to track the birds as they moved from the South horizon, through the zenith, to the North horizon, swinging away from the current satellite over to the next when the current one gets too low toward the North horizon. The transmitting antennas would have to do the same thing. Inevitably, this would result in at least 6 outages every day for at least several seconds. 'Really bad idea.
The Russians did it for a TV satellite. Sirius also has a similar orbit for their satellites. The orbit name is called "Molnya".
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