With Windows 9, Microsoft may finally forget the past and embrace the future

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by mobilelawyer, Apr 2, 2014.

  1. Apr 2, 2014 #1 of 23
    mobilelawyer

    mobilelawyer Occasional Old Timer

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    Am I just panic prone, or is Microsoft about to set a course with Windows 9 that leaves the video hobbiest out in the cold?

    "Interestingly, Windows 9 might not include a “Desktop for running legacy Win32 apps,” according to “previous tips,” and will be updated “frequently and regularly” via the Windows Store."

    Say good bye to Win 32 apps?

    I am more inclined to shout "Say it ain't so!" First they abandon development of Windows Media Center.Now, I suppose we can say goodbye to TiVo Desktop software, VideoReDo, Total Media Theatre, Showbiz, Mediabrowser and a ton of other programs that are not 64 bit programs.

    I am going to have to start looking at other OS options.
     
  2. Apr 2, 2014 #2 of 23
    alansh

    alansh Active Member

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    Little early to panic -- Win8 will be supported through January 10, 2023.

    I think it's almost certain that Win8 will be the last that runs on 32-bit CPUs, but I kinda doubt they'll ditch Win32 compatibility entirely. They still haven't released a Visual Studio development kit that runs natively in 64 bit.

    Heck, the 32 bit edition of Windows 8 will still run 16 bit programs.
     
  3. Apr 3, 2014 #3 of 23
    Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    It would take a bit of work but we'll get VideoReDo running on 64bit if we have to.
     
  4. Apr 3, 2014 #4 of 23
    mr.unnatural

    mr.unnatural Well-Known Member

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    This may be the kick in the pants that software developers need to put out their programs in 64-bit. There's really no reason to be running 32-bit Windows on a PC anymore, especially with the current legacy support for 64-bit apps. 64-bit has been around for quite some time, but developers have been dragging their feet putting out their apps in 64-bit format.

    By the time Windows 9 rolls out, a lot of us will probably be thinking about a PC upgrade anyway. There's a certain percentage of PC sales that are directly related to the new release of a Windows OS (just don't ask me what it is :D). If you still need 32-bit support, hang onto that old PC to use on special occasions. If it's running XP, just disconnect it from the internet and you'll be fine.
     
  5. Apr 3, 2014 #5 of 23
    slowbiscuit

    slowbiscuit FUBAR

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    Moving apps to 64-bit is not a simple recompile and done, it does take work. And if you don't need the extra memory, why do you think they would want to take the time and money to do it?
     
  6. Apr 3, 2014 #6 of 23
    tomhorsley

    tomhorsley Well-Known Member

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    Actually, it is a simple recompile and done if the apps was written well instead of being filled with bad assumptions like ints and pointers being the same size. I've seen vast amounts of code port from 32 to 64 bit with zero effort (and, of course, equally vast amounts of code that didn't :).
     
  7. Apr 3, 2014 #7 of 23
    Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    Exactly. For VRD it's not just our own code either. We use a lot of external libraries (i.e. codecs, muxers, etc...) that would either need to be upgraded or replaced.

    In reality most apps don't need 64bit, so forcing them to upgrade is a bit heavy handed and likely to piss off more people then it benefits.
     
  8. Apr 3, 2014 #8 of 23
    tomhorsley

    tomhorsley Well-Known Member

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    Actually video codes is a really good reason to want to go to 64 bits, not for more memory, but for twice as many vector registers being available in the 64 bit x86 architecture. Certainly the ffmpeg software takes advantage of that for most of their codecs.
     
  9. Apr 3, 2014 #9 of 23
    Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    We've done testing with 64bit and it only makes a marginal difference when it comes to encoding speed. And for smart edits it makes zero difference, because the process is mostly I/O bound.
     
  10. slowbiscuit

    slowbiscuit FUBAR

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    Anyone that claims porting a lot of legacy code to 64-bit is trivial really hasn't done a lot of code porting, IMO (not looking at you Tom, in general). And more importantly, there is little to no benefit in doing so for the vast majority of apps out there. Wasn't Office still 32-bit until 2010 came out? And even now, there's not much need for a 64-bit version of it.

    The notion that Win9 won't support 32-bit apps is a non-starter, IMO.
     
  11. hoyty

    hoyty Member

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    Actually Office 2013 is still 32 bit predominantly as well. The only thing that has 64-bit option is Access and Excel I think. Further MS recommends not installing 64-bit versions unless you actually need it due to compatibility.

    They are bringing back the start menu in Windows 9, they showed a screen shot of it yesterday, which is for desktop users who will most likely be using legacy apps. Why would they do that and drop 32-bit.

    Don't believe it.
     
  12. stahta01

    stahta01 Simple Member

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    I think they will likely only be a 64 bit OS; but, still run 32 bit apps.

    That is just my wild guess.

    Tim S.
     
  13. hoyty

    hoyty Member

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    Yep, probably ARM based RT for Phone / Small tablet and 64 bit only x86-64 for laptop / desktop / server. They dropped 32-bit version of server 5 years ago. The 32-bit version of 8(.1) existed mostly for really low end x86 tablets which are slowly going away.
     
  14. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    Cool!
    [​IMG]

    Looks like the trend of every other major version being a winner will continue.

    That makes much more sense.
     
  15. lessd

    lessd Well-Known Member

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    On my Windows 8.1 I use a $5 program from Stardock that gives the same thing, start button and much more, makes Windows 8.1 look like windows 7.
     
  16. poppagene

    poppagene User

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    LIkely this was just an April Fools posting
     
  17. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    I use that too. (Start8) I also use ModernMix which allows you to run Metro apps in a Window, which Win9 will also do. So I guess a few of their apps are going to get less useful once this lands.
     
  18. cherry ghost

    cherry ghost Well-Known Member

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  19. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    Not necessarily.
     
  20. truman861

    truman861 New Member

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    I've always said the day Microsift makes something that doesnt suck will be the day they start selling vacuum cleaners
     

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