Wireless-N for Tivo S3

Discussion in 'TiVo Series3 HDTV DVRs' started by rmason92066, Mar 9, 2007.

  1. Mar 9, 2007 #1 of 108
    rmason92066

    rmason92066 New Member

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    Anybody, please let me know if this question has been asked.

    Is Tivo looking at going Wireless-N in the future? I have a wireless-N router (works fine with wireless-g adapter in Tivo) and was just curious as to a timeframe.
     
  2. Mar 9, 2007 #2 of 108
    byrne

    byrne New Member

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    What difference does it make if there is no TivoToGo?

    I still use 802.11b and wouldn't even consider upgrading unless there TTG was enabled.
     
  3. Mar 9, 2007 #3 of 108
    TydalForce

    TydalForce Active Member

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    There's no 802.11n wireless adapter at this point. You could always get a Wireless Bridge (sometimes called "Gaming adapter") and hook it up to the S3's Ethernet port if you really wanted one.
     
  4. Mar 9, 2007 #4 of 108
    rmason92066

    rmason92066 New Member

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    I appreciate the quick response. Guess I'll keep watching for updates.
     
  5. Mar 9, 2007 #5 of 108
    Gregor

    Gregor Wear Your Mask! TCF Club

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    It makes a huge difference for downloaded content like that available from Amazon.
     
  6. Mar 9, 2007 #6 of 108
    Amnesia

    Amnesia The Question

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    How so? 802.11b goes at, what? 11MB? That's faster than the vast majority of broadband connections. What good would it be to have your TiVo talk to your router at speeds faster than that if your router is limited in how fast it communicates with the Internet?
     
  7. Mar 9, 2007 #7 of 108
    byrne

    byrne New Member

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    The original poster was talking about upgrading from 802.11g which theoretically supports up to 54 Mbps.. Typical residential high speed connections are 6Mbps or 8Mbps.

    N does have a better range, so if that's what one is after it could be good to have.

    As far as me, I'm completely content with my B connection. I doubt I will do anything with the amazon unbox deal, as I am not at all impressed with any part of it. An 11Mbps connection is more than enough to download software updates while I'm sleeping, and to communicate with the Tivo any Online Scheduling requests.
     
  8. Mar 9, 2007 #8 of 108
    Gregor

    Gregor Wear Your Mask! TCF Club

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    +1

    If you live in a high-density area, ie apartments, condos, etc, the bandwidth interference can be awful due to having multiple wireless networks in the area.
     
  9. Mar 9, 2007 #9 of 108
    Amnesia

    Amnesia The Question

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    Still, let's say you get 5MB from b. How fast is your broadband connection?
     
  10. Mar 9, 2007 #10 of 108
    Gregor

    Gregor Wear Your Mask! TCF Club

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    I have an 8mb connection.

    But...down to my laptop when I was running 802.11b? Never got more than 1 MB speed.

    Even with a G connection now, there's just too much interference to get a lot of speed, and it's rarely over 5 MB (tonite it's 4.7)
     
  11. Mar 10, 2007 #11 of 108
    aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    You should find out what channels are in use and change your wireless to a channel not being used or that has less usage. My wireless G network hits the max most of time. and when using the Internet there is no difference between my laptop wireless connection and the wired connection on my PC. They both hit 26mbs with the Comcast powerboost and then when that's done it drops to 8.8mbs which is the max speed I have without powerboost. I have several wirelss networks near me but most of them are on channel six so my two access points use channel one and channel 11.
     
  12. Mar 10, 2007 #12 of 108
    rdrrepair

    rdrrepair Bill Knapp

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    I am sure this has been stated before... and apologies to anyone who might tell me I stated the obvious - If his house allows it, wouldn't it be better to just run an ethernet cable back to the wireless router? How about adding a repeater? I've also seen larger antennas for the router at Office Max that claims to increase speeds.

    What is the limits to adding an ethernet cable? 100'-1000'... How many repeaters?

    Wouldn't his speeds increase? I noticed when my Linksys Wireless-G w/ TiVo adapter was passive I had 80%-90% and when downloading an Unbox TV show it went down to 55%-65%.

    I know this should probably be asked in the "TiVo Home Media Features & TiVoToGo" forum but the OP might be looking at this thinking he has limited options like a Wireless-N.
     
  13. Mar 10, 2007 #13 of 108
    rdrrepair

    rdrrepair Bill Knapp

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    Additional info, food for thought:

    I just did a MRV transfer from 1 TiVo downstairs at 75% to another TiVo at 85% and at the same time I did a Unbox download to the one at 85%. The Unbox was at 1 minute while the MRV was at 14 minutes. This indicates a slowdown at the internet and not at the wireless.
     
  14. Mar 10, 2007 #14 of 108
    stevetd

    stevetd New Member

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    Has a wireless-n standard been set yet? Everything I've read so far says it hasn't.
     
  15. Mar 11, 2007 #15 of 108
    PressureDrop

    PressureDrop New Member

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    Photos, Music, Transfers (between our two Series 2 boxes), and system updates and program guides are all VERY noticeably faster on G versus B (what I used to have).

    I tested it out for kicks with the exact same everything except different (identical) boxes and one on a B adapter and the other on a G adapter. The G setup finished in less than 1/3 the time of the B setup and the place it showed the most was channel guide downloading.
     
  16. Mar 11, 2007 #16 of 108
    aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    No not yet. They say it probably won't be ratified by the IEEE until 2008. But they do have the final specs now and only expect minor changes, if any. All the exisiting Pre-N devices are supposed to be able to be upgraded to the final spec if what I read was true.
     
  17. Mar 11, 2007 #17 of 108
    drew00001

    drew00001 New Member

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    For comparison only, I too have a 8mb connection but have an IBM Thinkpad with wireless G, which averages about 3.5mb.
     
  18. Mar 12, 2007 #18 of 108
    rmason92066

    rmason92066 New Member

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    Lots of input. Appreciated. As for my broadband connection, I am not worried about that. I am only concerned about my internal network. I realize that it doesn't really matter if you have lightning speed internally if you only have 1,2, 8Mbps, etc out to the internet. As far as running cable, I am waiting to do this when I actually do some more major remodels in my house. At that time I will cable the house. In the meantime, I am just trying to get the best signal I can via wireless. Big house, lots of walls, electrical to interfere. So far, the G-adapters in the Tivo's are working very well with the N-router. Again, thanks to everyone for the input. As for the "N" specs to be finalized, it has not been done yet, but all N devices will be upgradeable from what I have been reading.
     
  19. Mar 13, 2007 #19 of 108
    jacksonian

    jacksonian New Member

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    I've been using a Belkin Pre-N wireless router with my RoadRunner 5mb connection for over a year now. I got a significant boost in range and speed when I switched from a b/g router to the N.
     
  20. Mar 15, 2007 #20 of 108
    aaronw

    aaronw Member

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    For all those getting lots of interference on 802.11 B/G, I recommend trying out 802.11 A. My laptop supported it, so I picked up an A/B/G router. when I had the laptop on B/G it would drop constantly, every hour. It didn't do so at work. Now that I have A at home, it's rock solid.
     

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