Wireless G or hard line best for Netflix?

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by Torino, Oct 28, 2011.

  1. Tivoli

    Tivoli Member

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    Jan 23, 2002
    It depends...

    If your G adapter is getting a good signal, then going wired probably will not help. Did you check your ISP speed?, it could be the lowest denominator. Wireless G has a better penetration (due to lower frequency then N) than N when your router and adapter are far apart (several walls, floors etc). Before doing more work or considering N router, check the signal level on G adapter. If it is good then ideally you should able to achieve about 50Mbs (providing no other wireless device is hogging the channel, which does not have to be your own but can even be your neighbors wireless network). If you live in a densely populated area you see many other wireless networks, it would be a good idea to look for a less crowded channel. But if you do not want to mess with wireless channel settings on your G router, that alone would be a good reason to go wired.
     
  2. jeff92k7

    jeff92k7 Annoyed with trolls

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    Jan 18, 2006
    on planet earth
    True, if you live inside an RF shielded home and never use any other 2.4GHz devices like a cordless phone, or a microwave. In the real world however.....

    Jeff
     
  3. jeff92k7

    jeff92k7 Annoyed with trolls

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    Not true. Single band "N" wireless uses the exact same frequencies as "G" (2.4GHz range), but offers faster speeds while still being backwards compatible. If there isn't a good enough signal to support the faster speeds, it will reduce the transmission rate by steps into the "G" speed ranges too. So with "N" you get the possibility for faster speeds if there, but no worse performance than "G". With dual-band (2.4 and 5GHZ), you double the available spectrum and increase speeds dramatically. If one band is crowded, the other will still be used. Plus, "N" equipment typically has better antennas in it allowing for better reception at longer distances.

    Ha...I wish. With wireless being a half-duplex medium, meaning it can only transmit OR receive but cannot do both at the same time, You'll be lucky if you can get 35Mbps throughput out of it (G wireless) once packet and transmission overhead are taken into account. With "N" the increased speeds allow for higher throughput, though it is still limited to the laws of physics meaning you'll never actually see the "rated" speed on data throughput.

    Jeff
     
  4. Chris Gerhard

    Chris Gerhard Well-Known Member

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    Apr 27, 2002
    AR
    Does it matter whether it is wired or wireless when using TiVo? Since I only stream YouTube and Pandora using TiVoHD, I sure haven't noticed any difference.
     
  5. aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    Jan 31, 2002
    Northern...
    In the real world you use multiplte access points/frequencies to give you proper overlapping coverage so you don't have issues. I can turn on my microwave without issues. I don't have a 2.4Ghz access point near there. The bridge I have sitting on top of the microwave uses 5GHz so there are zero problems with my cameras transmitting video on the wireless bridge when the mircrowave is on(it''s been many, many years since I've used a 2.4GHz phone. my current ones are 1.9Ghz(DECT6.0)prior to that I used 5.8Ghz). Again the wireless network needs to be setup properly to avoid issues.
    This includes a wireless survey to identify the best use of frequencies and placement of devices so issues can be avoided.
     
  6. jeff92k7

    jeff92k7 Annoyed with trolls

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    Jan 18, 2006
    on planet earth
    I completely agree that the wireless network needs to be set up properly. What I disagreed with was the blanket statement that "You shoudln't be having ANY signal fluctuation..." There will always be signal fluctuations no matter how well set up a wireless network is. If a network is set up properly, then the fluctuations and interference will not be enough to make an appreciable difference in performance, but there will always be fluctuations. Heck, even temperature and humidity affect the way radio waves travel through the air (albeit very slightly).

    Just semantics...not really arguing. Sorry if it came across that way.

    Jeff
     
  7. aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    Northern...
    Yes, I should not have made that blanket statement. You explained it much, much better than I did. Thanks for the clarification.
     

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