Will this work???

Discussion in 'DirecTV TiVo Powered PVRs & Receivers' started by sortsol, Mar 16, 2006.

  1. sortsol

    sortsol New Member

    20
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    Jan 7, 2005

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    Hi,

    I would like to alleviate the noise (loudness) that comes along with having a tivo. Therefore, I would like to do the following and was wondering if all the smart experts would be able to tell me if this would work.

    Locate all (3) tivos in my utility room in my basement (also the room where I have my network of lines running to all of the rooms).

    Purchase three RF Remote Converters from Weaknees (or another source)

    Run the output from each tivo to one of the tv's (where the the tivo was previously located.)

    So, I guess my questions are in this order. Will this work?? Will the rf units interfere with each other?? Can I control each tivo unit independently with this setup (I will have 3 tivo remotes all located in the room where the tv is.)


    Thanks for the expertise.

    Mike
     
  2. DavidS

    DavidS Member

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    Sep 27, 2000
    Dayton Ohio
    I don't know much about RF converters, but why do you need three? Assign different remote codes to each box (don't they have different codes now?) and get a single programmable remote (e.g. Harmony) and program separate activities for each TiVo box. Then use just one converter.
     
  3. sortsol

    sortsol New Member

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    Jan 7, 2005

    Thanks for the suggestion, but we sometimes have somebody in every room watching their own show and would need their own remote. Good thought though.
     
  4. SeattleCarl

    SeattleCarl New Member

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    Nov 10, 2005
    Take your proposed setup to the next step up - put an rf modulator on each unit so that you can set what channel the output is on, then combine the outputs and feed that to all rooms. For example, unit one appears on channel 70, unit two on channel 72 and unit 3 on channel 74. That way, you can watch any tivo from any tv.

    Carl
     
  5. sortsol

    sortsol New Member

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    Jan 7, 2005

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    So, I wasn't going to necessarily take it that far, I am planning on upgrading my tivos so I would be able to use MRV. (alleviating the need for an RF modulator), but, once again, good suggestion.

    I am mostly wondering if having 3 rf remote converters located right next to each other will pose a problem.
     
  6. soccergrunt

    soccergrunt New Member

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    Jan 30, 2005
    Indianapolis
    sortsol,
    The key is having the remote address correct. you will only need one RF converter receiver pointed at the Tivo boxes. Each remote will then need one RF transmitter. If the remotes are coded to control a specific box, they shouldn't interfere with each other. If you do not have programmable remotes like a Harmony where you can program a separate remote code for each box, then each viewing location will need separate remote programmed for each box. i have two Tivo boxes in a central location that i can access from 3 different tvs. I use IR blasters with a Harmony remote in each location. the vidio output routes to an IR remote control video switch prior to connecting to the house cables. I control each box by defining it into an activity within the remote. When that activity is selected it also switches the video switch to the correct input. All three locations use a separate IR blaster transmitter going to one receiver at the central location.

    Hope this helps.
     
  7. gfb107

    gfb107 New Member

    1,134
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    Jul 16, 2001
    Cary, NC, USA
    You'll need an IR-to-RF converted near each TV, but only one RF-to-IR converter in the basement.

    I would recommend using a wired solution rather than wireless one. I personally use the Xantech XtraLink with additional Xtra Link2™ Xpansion Kits in my situation. See the TiVo Distribution link in my signature.
     
  8. sortsol

    sortsol New Member

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    Jan 7, 2005

    Thanks soccergrunt. I think we're making some progress. So, here's what I'm thinking. I need to purchase 1 remote extender such as this: http://www.weaknees.com/rf_remote_details.php with two extra rf transmitters. One for each tivo remote. Then I would just need to program each remote to only work with that particular tivo machine. Correct??

    Thanks,

    Mike
     
  9. soccergrunt

    soccergrunt New Member

    36
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    Jan 30, 2005
    Indianapolis
    Mike,
    That will work. You will be able to access the Tivo remotely from their opriginal location without them causing a problem with each other. I would re-program their remote addresses according to the manual using a separate code for each before moving then to one location. That way you won't need to worry about covering the IR sensor on the boxes you are not programming at that time. Don't use remote address 0. That address is a global one that will control any Tivo box. You need to use 1-3.


    Tim
     
  10. JeffS

    JeffS Member

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    May 12, 2002
    Chicago, IL
    Sounds like you've got a good plan. It's similar in some ways to how I'm redoing my current setup.

    I'm not sure how you're sending the a/v signals up to the tvs in varoius rooms. I saw you weren't keen on the modulators, rebroacasting over coax. If you pick up a couple of decent programable modulators, it works really well. That's what I'm doing right now.

    Here's my suggestion though for the remote part. Since you've had the tivos in each room already, you should be able to use the existing coax infrastructure to do this with little or no change. Look at getting IR transmitters an emitters for the various rooms. Basically, it will "see" the signal at the room you're in, inject it over the coax line, and through an emitter on the far end, play it back aimed at your tivos. It's more reliable than RF, and you don't have to worry about distances, interference, or neighbors on similar frequencies.

    I've used the small pyramids to retransmit the ir signal between rooms before. I discovered, that I have a neighbor with tivo. And they kept screwing up my viewing, but chaning the channel or hitting some odd button, that my receiver was picking up. VERY annoying. Hardwired, it's the way to go.

    -Jeff
     
  11. sortsol

    sortsol New Member

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    Jan 7, 2005

    Thanks Jeff,

    I really like that idea. I'm going to have to investigate that. I'm not at all against modulators. I just haven't researched them enough to know if they would work well for my situation (whether there would be signal loss, etc...). Guess I'll have to sit down and think about it some more. Thanks for the suggestions though and if anybody has anything else to add, I would love to hear it.

    To send the signal back up to the tv, I was just going to use coax line running from the tivo to the tv. (lines that were/are original signal to the tivo).

    Thanks,

    Mike
     
  12. classicsat

    classicsat Astute User

    17,877
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    Feb 18, 2004
    Ontario Canada.
    You don't necessarily need modulators. You can use existing coax for video and Cat5 for audio. You might even be able to send video over cat5e.
     
  13. the_scotsman

    the_scotsman Member

    62
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    Jul 28, 2005
    Dallas TX
    Mike

    This is exactly what I do.

    Most of my units are located in one closet.

    Most of the units hare controlled by the RF converter remote extenders. I bought one complete kit for each remote - you'll be shocked how quickly you go through the 2/3 AAA batteries (each receiver has a built-in charger).


    All the units in the closet are connected to a Denon upconverting amp which then drives my Plasma TV in the family room via a component connection. Input is selected by the the denon control - but in reality we only switch between the HD Tivo and a couple of SD Tivos so only two controls are required (one is a dual Tivo remote).

    One of the other Tivos drives the Bedroom TV via S-video.

    Another Tivo drives the guest TV via coax.

    All the S2 DTivos are connected via CAT5 for MRV.

    I had no need to go the modulator route.


    Take note: If you put a lot of equipment in the closet then you me need some vent system due to all the heat. Right now, I can't close the closet door otherwise the closet temp goes over 100F. I'm going to install an extractor system to pull out the hot are from up top and allow the cooler air to enter from under the door.

    Just wish I could schedule recordings on remote MRV machines from a local machine - that would be very useful!

    HTH

    Paul
     
  14. sortsol

    sortsol New Member

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    Jan 7, 2005
    So, would the signal be strong enough if I ran a coax line from each box to the tv or would I need an amplifier on each one? I know that coax signal isn't the best, but neither are our tv's :) The runs aren't very long. The room is located pretty centrally in the house.

    Thanks,

    Mike
     
  15. JeffS

    JeffS Member

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    May 12, 2002
    Chicago, IL
    Assuming you're using an external modulator from the composite outs of the Tivos, you'll have enough signal depending on how long the run is. If you're passing multipe signals, like multiple Tivos, combined with a splitter/joiner you can get away with a single amp after they are combined.

    They also make powered amps, that will combine the coax signals, as well as amplify.

    Modulators, work well, in given situations. I got fairly inexpensive mono modulators, since they are running to the upstairs TVs for extra viewing. For the main TV area, that's coming off of direct signals. You can get stereo modulators, but the price jumps up quite a bit. At that point it might, and I only say might, be cheaper to go with a cat5 solution.

    The have baluns for sending audio, and svideo over cat5, but they aren't cheap, and I've never seen the signal quality that comes out of them.

    Prices may not be the greatest, but checkout smarthome.com they've got a decent selection of equipment for audio and video distribution. It's a good site for looking around and getting ideas.

    -Jeff
     
  16. the_scotsman

    the_scotsman Member

    62
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    Jul 28, 2005
    Dallas TX
    How long is long?

    I run the S-video lines for 25' & 35' and the component lines for 35'-40'.

    The coax line run is over 60'

    Paul
     
  17. JeffS

    JeffS Member

    36
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    May 12, 2002
    Chicago, IL
    When I say long, I'm talking around 200-300 feet.

    signal degradation is caused by multiple factors. distance, cable quality, interference, etc. A well shielded, well made cable, of good material, will do a lot better than one that's not as well made.

    I'm also a cable junkie though. I make my own interconnects, to my specs, and to custom length. And that just between components. Bad habits from growing up as an audio geek. (audiophiles have more money than audiogeeks)

    -Jeff
     
  18. sortsol

    sortsol New Member

    20
    0
    Jan 7, 2005

    Thanks Jeff,

    Sounds like you get into this a bit more than I do :) My runs are only about 50 ft at the most, so it sounds like it should work fine.

    Mike
     

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