Why no 1080P on the HDTiVo?

Discussion in 'TiVo Series3 HDTV DVRs' started by BlackBetty, Sep 6, 2007.

  1. bkdtv

    bkdtv New Member

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    You could say the same thing about Blu-ray and HD-DVD. Neither of those formats supports 1080p60, yet every player has 1080p60 output. At some point, 1080p60 output will become standard on STBs and DVRs too.

    The ATSC has nothing to do with cable. Some cable channels are looking at the possibility of 1080p60 now, but that is still 3-5 years off.

    I was simply stating a fact. The chip in the TivoHD cannot output 1080p60.
     
  2. Revolutionary

    Revolutionary Too sleepy for TV...

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    I'm not belaboring any points, I just want it to be clear that I never suggested that there is such a thing as 1080p30 source content on television. I was refering to the display, not the content. Of course, I really should have said "1080p/30 or 1080p/60 (depending on the monitor)." That might have affected your inference, so I apologize for the confusion.
     
  3. Mike Farrington

    Mike Farrington Lost Member

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    I've had a S3 for a while, but just bought a TivoHD for the in-laws. I noticed when pressing the format button on the face that there is a 1080p light on the unit (that never lights up).

    Anybody think TiVo will activate 1080p on either S3 device in the future? I also noticed that my S3 mentions 1080p in the video output section. There is no option for it, but I can't see the reason for even mentioning it if it will never be supported.

    And for those who say there is no sense in having 1080p output since there is currently no OTA or cable 1080p... what about internet-based movie delivery? That is the perfect situation for 1080p.

    I'm hoping HD Amazon Unbox delivery is the next big thing down the pipe. I'm not ready to buy a 1080p HD-DVD or Blu-Ray player until the format war is won, or the players get a lot cheaper. The 1080p players are still up around $700 at the moment.
     
  4. Joybob

    Joybob New Member

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    Ain't no 1080p channels.
     
  5. BlackBetty

    BlackBetty I

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    The future of HD video rentals is downloads, not DVD's. Internet download services will do to DVD's what music downloads has done to CD's. And for this reason I will never buy a HD DVD or Blu-Ray player.
     
  6. Joybob

    Joybob New Member

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    "Nielsen SoundScan said 588.2 million albums were sold in 2006"

    What planet do you live on?
     
  7. HDTiVo

    HDTiVo Not so Senior Member

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    I looked at Sony's site recently and they've written their 24p feature description for those 120Hz sets to sound more general than just their own Blu Ray player.

    Have you found out anything more the last few weeks?

    I also noted the SXRD now is slated for Jan 08 and there's no 60" XBR, just 70" .
     
  8. BlackBetty

    BlackBetty I

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    Earth, familar with it? If you think music downloads hasn't put a giant dent into CD sales, then you need to put down the smelling salts and that goes for your buddy Nielsen there as well.

    CD sales plummeted 20% comparing 2007 to 2006.
     
  9. BlackBetty

    BlackBetty I

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    I am very sad about that. I was planning on buying the 60" XBR on Sonys next revision of it. Now I have to get some serious wifey approval for the increase in $$ for the 70"
     
  10. Joybob

    Joybob New Member

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    Yeah, they're literally going out of business.
     
  11. nexus99

    nexus99 New Member

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    Oct 17, 2002
    To totally change the subject... is there anyway to watch 1080/24p (Did I say that right?) natively with a TIVO. (Without having to convert to the 60 hertz NTSC stuff.) (This would be dependant on the TV maybe... or could you hook up to a projector or something?)

    It would be cool to download a Amazon Unbox (or something on my PC that in the future could be TTCB'ed) HD movie and watch it at the frame rate it was supposed to be shown at.
    Possible?
     
  12. bkdtv

    bkdtv New Member

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    Not with the current software.

    Output at 1080p24 is currently disabled (or not supported by the current decoder driver). I've tested with 1080p24 MPGs.

    It's possible with a future version of the software, yes.

    At some point in the future, Amazon or some other Tivo partner could offer 1080p24 content for download and the hardware could output in that format.
     
  13. HiDefGator

    HiDefGator New Member

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    And what year will the internet become fast enough for most people to tolerate the time it would take to download an HD movie at full DVD resolution?
     
  14. MickeS

    MickeS Well-Known Member

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    "most people" in many target demographics already have fast enough connections. The XBOX 360 downloads seem to be pretty popular.
    If you mean "most people" in the US, that will be a while.
     
  15. Joybob

    Joybob New Member

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    In all fairness, 1080i60 = 1080p30 for static or slow moving images so you're really not missing out on much.
     
  16. HDTiVo

    HDTiVo Not so Senior Member

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    Let her know how much you are saving because you don't have to buy another house to fit it in. :)

    How good is 24p really, even on 120Hz displays? The fact that there are only 24 frames makes me wonder how it compares to video shot at 60i and 60p.
     
  17. WizarDru

    WizarDru New Member

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    CD sales have plummeted, but they still account for 85% of music sales in the US...and more importantly, the same article that mentions the 20% drop points out that download sales HAVE NOT offset the loss. In other words, CD sales can't solely blame legal downloads for eating away at their sales. The collapse of large national music retailers (Tower, Sam Goody, etc.) played a large part, too. 800 music stores closed in 2006, alone. The rise of big-box retailers like Walmart and Target have had an effect, as well. Smaller selection at a retailer leads to fewer impulse buys. The closing of my local Tower records curtailed a lot of my CD purchasing. And many big-box retailers are accelerating the change, by shrinking the space devoted to CDs on their floor space. Best Buy began reducing the space devoted to CDs quietly last year, and places like Target and Walmart never maintained that large a space to begin with, especially compared against the more lucrative DVD sales. Less selection and fewer places to purchase creates a downward spiral.

    Further, the rise of places like myspace has allowed unprecedented access to artists who aren't currently on ANY major label, allowing some consumers to bypass the big labels entirely. Purchasing from a place like CDBaby or direct from the content producer certainly is going to take away from the sales of the larger companies. The question of an aging populace is one that hasn't been examined, I think. It may be that one of the reasons CD sales have peaked is that a lot of people just moved out of the CD purchasing demographic...but I have no idea how true that might be.

    I personally agree that online sales of music, particularly download sales, have reduced and are going to continue to reduce CD sales overall. But let's not overstate the case, just yet.
     
  18. hastypete

    hastypete Member

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    A little off topic, but what are the differences? and which did you prefer?
     
  19. Bodie

    Bodie Member

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    Honolulu
    Amazing, given that 2007 is only ~80% complete... :rolleyes:
     
  20. morac

    morac Cat God TCF Club

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    NJ
    But the XBOX 360 downloads are in Windows Media format which is a form of MPG4. TiVo currently only handles MPEG-2. A one hour HD MPG-2 file can be upwards of 18 GB. Even target demographic areas don't have speeds fast enough for that. If TiVo starts using MPG4 for downloads, then that's a different story.
     

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