What's your network adapter of choice?

Discussion in 'TiVo Premiere DVRs' started by BojiBob, Jun 25, 2011.

  1. BojiBob

    BojiBob New Member

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    May 15, 2005

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    Hi all,

    We just got a Premiere and we were getting ready to set it up. We were wondering what you would recommend for a network adapter? We're just looking for something that's easy to use and low maintenance. Thanks!
     
  2. unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    Do you mean a wireless adapter?

    I think the only two choices are the TiVo brand G and N adapters, aren't they?
     
  3. rainwater

    rainwater Active Member

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    No, there are plenty of wireless bridge/gaming adapters you can buy.

    If you are going to be streaming Netflix or use the network features, I would go with the N adapter (or a N gaming adapter).
     
  4. unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    Don't the TiVo brand units have extra hardware built in to avoid the "WinModem" effect, i.e., not make the TiVo's processor do extra work?
     
  5. Stuxnet

    Stuxnet Alien Infidel

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    I opted for a power line adaptor...
     
  6. nrc

    nrc Cracker Soul

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    The G adapter has extra hardware built in to reduce the CPU load compared to most USB adapters.

    The N adapter plugs into the Ethernet jack and works just like most other wireless N bridges or gaming adapters. It is probably a little more attractive and easier to setup than others so it's a good choice for the average TiVo owner.
     
  7. BojiBob

    BojiBob New Member

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    May 15, 2005
    Yes, I meant a wireless adapter. I had read some conflicting reviews about the TiVo N adapters and was just curious what the general consensus was around here about what adapters to use. But if the TiVo adapters work okay then I'm alright with that......
     
  8. JimboG

    JimboG New Member

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    Just run Cat 6 cable. It's faster and more reliable. It should be cheaper too if you can run the cable yourself.

    If you can't run Ethernet, go with Moca or a powerline adapter. Wired > wireless.
     
  9. magnum68

    magnum68 New Member

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    I've been using Power Line Ethernet on my three Premieres since the day I got them and they work just fine. Great for downloads and transfers. Very fast too.
     
  10. MrJedi

    MrJedi Member

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    Apr 13, 2011
    I use this: TRENDnet TEW 647GA Wireless N Gaming Adapter. Never had any issues. At some point I will do the 75 ft CAT6 run I intended to do when I bought it, but until then this performs better than any wireless adapter I have ever used on any device.
     
  11. DanielTB80

    DanielTB80 Member

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    Nov 26, 2006
    I took a pair of Linksys E2000 routers, put DD-WRT on them and turned the into wireless bridge switches. That way I can hook up the other networkable entertainment devices as well (TV, blu-ray, Wii, X-box 360, PS3, etc). I have been pretty impressed with the setup as it streams between upstairs and downstairs very well, with enough bandwitch to watch HD streams live on Premieres.

    Other configurations that have worked well under this setup:

    Premiere to Tivo HD transfers
    Transfers involving the Tivo Wireless N adaptor at N speeds.
     
  12. mattack

    mattack Well-Known Member

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    I bet those Linksys routers were expensive.. Fry's often has routers for $20-$30 that can do bridge mode.
     
  13. elwaylite

    elwaylite Member

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    Theodore, Al.
    I have a powerline adapter in the room with my modem, and one behind the ent center. I then have that eth line running to a netgear 5 port hub, which then branches out to all my av gear.
     
  14. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    +1

    Powerline is faster and more reliable then wireless. You might also consider MOCA if you have cable to both rooms and powerline doesn't work well in your house. (powerline is better then MOCA, so try it first)

    Dan
     
  15. aadam101

    aadam101 Tell me a joke

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    I have two separate circuit breaker boxes in my house. Do they need to be using the same box in order to work?
     
  16. Stuxnet

    Stuxnet Alien Infidel

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    For powerline? Yes, they need to be on the same leg. And don't connect them through surge protectors or UPS. Plug them straight into the wall outlet.
     
  17. unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    They don't necessarily need to be on the same box, but as Stuxnet indicated they need to be on the same 120V line. (The same "leg")

    You have 2 120V lines (2 "legs") coming to your house, along with a neutral, and a ground created at your meter base. (It is at this point, and only at this point, that the neutral and ground are tied together. Despite being called the neutral, current flows in it as well, it's the return for the "hot" lines. Only if something goes wrong should any current flow in the ground line.)

    You probably have a box at or near your meter, fed by your meter, which in turn feeds those 2 boxes you mentioned, which means that for one of those boxes there is a circuit breaker ahead of it made of two seperate breakers with the handles tied together so that if one side trips, both sides open. One of those breakers in that double breaker is connected to one of those 120V lines from the meter, and the other to the other 120V line from the meter.

    And there's another double breaker feeding the other box you mentioned.

    Each of the 2 boxes gets 2 120V lines coming in. (And the double breaker in the feeding box means both get shut off at the same time for safety's sake) This allows it to power both various 120V circuits, some from one line and some from the other, and to power 240V circuits (water heater, clothes dryer, stove, etc.).

    So, one of the 120V lines going to one of the 2 boxes you mentioned is electrically connected with one of the 120V lines going to the other box, and the other 120V line (which is 240 Volts away from the first one) is electrically connected to the other 120V line going to the other box as long as no breakers are tripped or opened.

    So if you plug one of those powerline network thingies into a socket fed by box #1, and another into another socket fed by box #1, but from the other 120V line, they won't be able to talk to each other.

    If you plug one of those powerline network thingies into a socket fed by box #1, and another into another socket fed by box #1, and both sockets are fed by the same 120V line, they should be able to talk to each other.

    If you plug one into a socket fed by box #1 and another into a socket fed by box #2, but both sockets are electrically tied together back at the box that feeds box #1 and #2, they should be able to talk to each other.

    If you plug one into a socket fed by box #1 and another into a socket fed by box #2, but those sockets don't trace back to the same 120V line coming from the meter, they won't be able to talk to each other.
     

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