What is best programable remote for Tivo peanut lover

Discussion in 'DirecTV TiVo Powered PVRs & Receivers' started by brucedelta, Sep 14, 2005.

  1. Sep 15, 2005 #41 of 157
    shahm

    shahm New Member

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    May 10, 2005
    I second the Sony RM-VL900. For around $30, No remote on this planet comes even close to the learning and macro capabilities of this remote. IT IS THE BIGGEST BANG FOR THE MONEY!!!!
     
  2. Sep 15, 2005 #42 of 157
    Guindalf

    Guindalf Now with added dalf

    2,635
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    Jun 13, 2001

    1. YES! That was the biggest question I asked when I got mine. In fact, I told the wife that "this thing had better sing and dance for that price or it goes back!"
    Guess what - it did. EVERY button on EVERY remote is there and what isn't can be programmed or even learned from the original. I couldn't find a pause button on my Centrios DVD Recorder (idiot me, it's the 'Play' button!), so I programmed the pause button on the Harmony using the learning functions. I can honestly say that, apart from responding fractionally slower than the peanut, it will do everything.

    2. IR.

    ...and by the way, there are places you can get them for around $100, not 200.
     
  3. Sep 15, 2005 #43 of 157
    brucedelta

    brucedelta New Member

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    Oct 2, 2001
    Voorhees, NJ
    Wow, I did not get a chance to get online yesterday and I am blown away by all the responses here. Thanks guys.
    I will digest this stuff and look at the web sites in addition to remote central to come to a decision. I have read about most of these on remote central, but the problem there is lack of data relative to what I know/love. Thats why I wanted to know what penut lovers use.
    Last time I tried multifunction remotes was a poor experience due to my not being able to read even a backlit LCD while watching. The TV penut is such a success in my mind because I can use it compleatly by feel, and that is the criteria I will look at these others for.
    -- Bruce
     
  4. Sep 15, 2005 #44 of 157
    rpfotog

    rpfotog Film & Video Geek

    73
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    May 31, 2004
    Philly
    Hey Bruce,

    I see you're in Voorhees. If you ever get over the Ben Franklin and want to see my MX-700 in action, shoot me an email or private message. I'd be more than happy to give you a demo. I'm literally 2 minutes from the BF Bridge.

    Rp
     
  5. Sep 16, 2005 #45 of 157
    inaka

    inaka Well-Known Member

    22,296
    6,701
    Nov 26, 2001
    I agree completely. I love the Sony RM-VL900. It's a solid remote and lays everything out perfectly. I personally use the "menu" button for the TiVo button, and use "display" and "sleep" for their positions for "thumbs up" and "thumbs down"

    Fantastic remote.
     
  6. Sep 16, 2005 #46 of 157
    CorrysD

    CorrysD New Member

    63
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    Dec 9, 2002
    Lafayette...
    In my setup, the Harmony supplied me with more buttons than my original remote! I have a commercial NEC plasma, which does not have seprate buttons on the remote for the discrete inputs. Since the consumer NEC has this functionality, when I added the NEC as a device on the harmony, it gave me those commands. Those "bonus" commands were pivotal when I set up my activities, i.e. Watch a DVD, Watch TiVo, etc.
     
  7. Sep 16, 2005 #47 of 157
    JTAnderson

    JTAnderson Active Member

    940
    76
    Jun 6, 2000
    Redondo...
    I really doubt that fully satisfying 1 is reasonable on any universal remote. However, you can place as many commands as you like on the LCD buttons.

    I believe there is a Harmony 890 coming that will support RF. I don't think any of the current models support RF.
     
  8. Sep 16, 2005 #48 of 157
    Charlutz

    Charlutz New Member

    331
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    Apr 7, 2005
    Columbia, MD
    The Harmonys are great. Fully customizable and very easy to use. No macros to program. I can tell my 14 year old baby sitter how to use the HT system and play a movie for the kids with the surround sound on in less than a minute. All of the other remotes went in a drawer and only come out when I am doing major programming changes to my components. I know someone above said they liked the 688, but there are complaints about that one in that the buttons aren't separated enough so that it's harder to use by feel. The 680 is a great choice. I have the 659 and like it a lot, even though the 676 and 680 are better for use with dvr's.

    One tip, if you go with a Harmony, get it from a place with a good return policy like Amazon. The prices fluctuate, but you can get any model except the new 880 for about $100 if you catch them on the right day. Amazon also has free return shipping. That is important because the Harmonys do seem to have some problems. Some of the units out of the box don't work right. The customer service is great, but if you return it under the manufacturer's warranty, you have to pay to ship the old unit back to Canada, and that can be expensive. Better that you can return it to Amazon on their dime and have them send you a new one.
     
  9. Sep 16, 2005 #49 of 157
    chris_h

    chris_h New Member

    638
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    Dec 17, 2003
    Sacramento, CA
    Another vote for the MX-500. Don't let the LCD bother you, it has a _great_ backlight, not that you will need it, since the buttons are easy to find in the dark. Take the MX-700 demo offered above if possible.
     
  10. Sep 16, 2005 #50 of 157
    kr8z1

    kr8z1 New Member

    35
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    Sep 28, 2003
    Geismar, LA
    MX-800 using RF..........LOVE IT!
     
  11. Sep 16, 2005 #51 of 157
    newsposter

    newsposter Poster of News

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    Aug 18, 2002
    SE PA
    I won't even try to push my t60 layout on anyone, it's obvious where you all stand ..you peanut lovers :)

    But I do have to know, do you tivo 2,3,4 a lot? I have a 1 week old peanut and it's nuts to hit tivo at the top then either 1,2,3,4. T60 remote is easier :)
     
  12. Sep 16, 2005 #52 of 157
    newsposter

    newsposter Poster of News

    35,614
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    Aug 18, 2002
    SE PA
    What do you use for the:
    tivo button
    live tv
    advance/30 second skip
    slow FF
    thumbs up/down (for either restarting tivo or s/o/r/t)

    I'm leaning towards sony because of it's placement of the numbers buttons and the select and arrow buttons. And of course it's the closest thing to the t60 i can find.

    And as lovely as the mx500 looks, I guess I just can't see how all the buttons on my t60 would map out to it.
     
  13. Sep 16, 2005 #53 of 157
    falz

    falz Some Title

    104
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    Mar 29, 2002
    Madison, WI
    For me, it's:

    Tivo=PIP
    Advance/Skip = STOP [square]
    Slow = I don't have this mapped. I never used this on my original Tivo (SVR-2000)
    Thumbs up/down = Not mapped, have the peanut in a drawer if I need to reset config/restart (maybe once every two months).

    A previous person suggested using tv/video and sleep as thumbs up/down. This would generally work. I use tv/video as "Clear" as it's in the same position as my SVR2000 remote that I *was* used to. (I use clear frequently to delete as shortcut)

    Menu and Guide are in the perfect spots on this remote as "list" and "guide".

    I've had touch screen remotes in the past (the original sony one, gahhh) and I hate them. I need to navigate by feel.

    --falz
     
  14. Sep 17, 2005 #54 of 157
    inaka

    inaka Well-Known Member

    22,296
    6,701
    Nov 26, 2001
    I just do everything by feel, mostly for placement with the T60.

    tivo button = "Menu"
    live tv = "Guide"
    advance/30 second skip = "Stop"
    slow FF = (not mapped; I never use this)
    thumbs down = "display"
    thumbs up = "sleep"
    I also use "PIP" for the "clear/delete" button

    I just used rubber cement and made stupid little tags for the buttons, and they actually hold up really well.

    Here's a pic (click to enlarge):

    [​IMG]

    System control 1 turns on the TV, amp, etc.
    System Control 2 & 3 toggle back and forth between two HD Tivos.

    It works really well. Hope this helps.
     
  15. Sep 17, 2005 #55 of 157
    newsposter

    newsposter Poster of News

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    Aug 18, 2002
    SE PA
    thx for the vl900 data. very helpful indeed. The rubber cement idea is good too. I know I would need it to get used to everything.

    Can you explain a bit more what the system buttons 1,2,3 do?
     
  16. Sep 17, 2005 #56 of 157
    falz

    falz Some Title

    104
    0
    Mar 29, 2002
    Madison, WI
    Those buttons are macros, so you can have them do anything you'd like. I personally have all three programmed as simple power buttons. 1=TV, 2=Receiver, 3=DVD.

    Also, the main component select buttons at the top (tv, vcr, cd, etc) work wonderfully for macros. In such a way that I haven't found on remotes in the past. Naturally use use them to "toggle" which function the remote is controlling. This works as intended. However, in remotes I've used in the past, I ususally have it set to spit out an IR signal to tell my receiver to go to a different intput, so I have to put my hand in front of it to prevent this signal when I just want to change remote function.

    On the VL900, these buttonds do two things. 1), toggle remote function if pressed for <1 second. 2) send a macro if it's held down for about 2 seconds. In my setup, "CBL/SAT" is my TiVo, so it will send a discreet signal to my TV to go to HDMI, tell my receiver to switch to the corresponding input, etc. The same for all other inputes (DVD, TiVo, Xbox, CD, etc).

    These remotes are $19 for a refurb at Ecost.

    --falz
     
  17. Sep 17, 2005 #57 of 157
    newsposter

    newsposter Poster of News

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    Aug 18, 2002
    SE PA
    well if the system 123 and also the other 8 buttons at the top are fully programmable, this seems like exactly what I need. It would avoid having to pick a 'non used' button on the HDtivo, dvd recorder and t60 remotes in order to hit my remote radio shack switch to the right input. Or I could just assign one of the 8 buttons to be the 'switch' remote.

    Sounds like a very flexible unit. Hope if i decide on it i can find it new locally.
     
  18. Sep 18, 2005 #58 of 157
    inaka

    inaka Well-Known Member

    22,296
    6,701
    Nov 26, 2001
    Yes, the macros really are fantastic.
    For the 1,2,3 at the top, I have them set to do a series of commands. 1 turns on the TV, turns on the receiver, sets the TV to Video 1, etc. As falz mentioned, you have the other macro buttons as well if you just hold them down. So I just hold down the DVD button to have the TV swtch to video 2, change the receiver input for DVD and then turn on the DVD player. Super easy, and works like a charm.

    You can still get these remotes new online, but they are about $30 if you go with a new one. This site has it
    here for $29.90.

    Enjoy!
     
  19. Sep 18, 2005 #59 of 157
    Octavio

    Octavio New Member

    39
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    Oct 2, 2003
    Visalia,...
    Harmony 880 for $170 here
     
  20. Sep 18, 2005 #60 of 157
    RMSko

    RMSko Active Member

    520
    26
    Sep 4, 2001
    Westfield,...
    If you are using a lot of macros and really want to customize the remote, my vote is for one of the Pronto family remotes. However, they are very pricey (the black and white version, the TSU3000, is around $200 and the color version, the TSU7000, is around $550). Although for my setup, the Pronto was well worth the money. I have the color version and have been able to create some very cool button designs and macros. For example, I have one button that has an NBC logo and I just hit that button to change the channel to NBC, change the lighting in my room, switch my A/V receiver to the input for the HD TiVo, change the mode on my A/V receiver, etc. IMO the Pronto's are the most customizable remotes available, you can set up an unlimited number of macros and design the look of the buttons almost any way you want. There is a steep learning curve though, but once you get through that, it's relatively easy (there are a lot of designs posted on remote central that can be used as templates). For me, programming my Pronto has become somewhat of a hobby.
     

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