View TiVo recordings on non TiVo TV?

Discussion in 'TiVo Home Media Features & TiVoToGo' started by RRiggs, Nov 19, 2011.

  1. RRiggs

    RRiggs New Member

    9
    0
    Nov 25, 2006
    What is the best way to view TiVo recordings on a separate, non TiVo attached TV?

    I have a fully wired home network - all TV cable jacks also have wired ethernet connections nearby. I have a couple home computers and run TiVo desktop on one of them. I have three TiVo boxes (one Premiere, two HD) on three HD TV's. We don't want to get another TiVo for a 4th TV, but the kids won't use the TV if it doesn't have the TiVo recordings available on the other TiVo connected TV's. We have a nice game room that no-one uses because there is no TiVo available!

    Would a Boxee box (or some other such device) do the trick? I have searched TiVo community (though probably not exhaustively) and have not found anything that seems to address this issue. (It sounds like there is manual file conversion necessary for the Boxee to stream TiVo files copied up by TiVo Desktop.) Do I need some Media Server application / box? Is there a thread or post here (or some other site) that would help describe the setup and usage for an automated solution - assuming it is possible?

    Any help on this would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. mpthompson

    mpthompson New Member

    18
    0
    Dec 30, 2006
    I have a Tivo Series 3 in my family room attached to a large screen television. I use the CE LABS 1001F Single-Channel Modulator attached to one of the auxilary video ports on the Series 3 to broadcast the Tivo video on analog channel 123 to the other three televisions in the house. I have structured media wire throughout my house and I use the extra coax cable to pass the Tivo signal. Since the other three televisions have cable boxes, I then combine the signal just before it goes into the television with the output from the cable box. Cable channels from the cable boxes are on channel 3/4 and the Tivo is on channel 123.

    Here is a link to the 1001F modulator I use on Amazon. It's not currently available, but you can probably find it elsewhere on the web or find an equivalent more modern device that functions in the same manner.

    CE LABS 1001F Prograde Single-Channel Modulator

    BTW, each television has a wireless RF remote that is used to control the Tivo from the remote locations.
     
  3. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

    6,933
    10
    Aug 31, 2003
    San...
    Any computer can be used to upload videos from your networked TiVos. At a bare minimum, it must be able to transfer via shtml and know how to decode .TiVo files. That's not a very stringent requirement. OTOH, it also is not a good recipe for a user-friendly platform to distribute the videos where they need to go.

    There are a lot of ways to skin this particular cat, but regardless of how its gets skinned, there are two essential elements:

    1. A repository for the video files.
    2. A media player to view the video files.

    Both of these systems can reside in a single unit, or the two functions can be split up into two separate systems. If the latter approach is taken, the video player can be a simple, canned application like a Boxee. If a single system is envisioned, then the player is going to have to be custom built. Note it may be practical to hack an existing platform. I think the Boxee runs Linux, so it might be possible to simply add the servers necessary to do the work. The interface might be problematical, though.

    The two unit approach is probably simpler. One can build a simple video server using kmttg or Galleon and tivodecode, plus whatever server the video player requires. I think Boxee supports several, including SMB. Note that no matter what, however, getting the videos onto the server is going to require some manual intervention to get the videos onto the server. It's never going to be a matter of selecting the videos directly off the TiVos, unless you do a little development work to build the application.

    Step 1, however, is to dump TiVoDesktop. I also definitely would recommend a Linux platform for the server.
     
  4. RRiggs

    RRiggs New Member

    9
    0
    Nov 25, 2006
    I did something similar, sharing one TiVo with two separate TV's, for several years. However, with a big family, sometimes all four TVs want to be active so this solution is not "my ideal" since the "shared" TiVo will not be available on both systems at the same time.

    Thank you for the suggestion!
     
  5. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

    6,933
    10
    Aug 31, 2003
    San...
    I took another look at this. The Boxee software can be run on almost any computing device. Given this, it might be very practical to set up a Boxee server running Galleon. With Galleon, one can transfer the video to the server from any TiVo in the house, or one can bring up the Galleon GUI from any PC in the house. Once on the server, one can have an automated script that converts the .TiVo files to .mpg. On the TV side, Boxee can be used to view any of the content on the hard drive or array.

    I just downloaded and installed the Boxee software, and it looks like it would be a very useable platform for your purpose. One caveat, however. If you decide to go with the one-box solution for this application, make sure you get a very good video card for the Boxee server. This machine has a very fast, six core processor, but only a ho-hum video card. MPEG2 videos seem to display fine, but MPEG4 video is a little jerky.
     
  6. bud8man

    bud8man Tivo Evangelist

    706
    0
    Feb 12, 2004
    Oakland, NJ
  7. bud8man

    bud8man Tivo Evangelist

    706
    0
    Feb 12, 2004
    Oakland, NJ
    Of course with a fully networked system you could just hook up a PC to the TV with TiVo Home Media and set it up to automatically download the shows the kids want in that room. Boxee does allow you to download as well and set up, and then you can use an android remote....
     

Share This Page