Unorthodox - Netflix *spoilers*

Discussion in 'Now Playing - TV Show Talk' started by Steveknj, Apr 20, 2020.

  1. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey TCF Club

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    I started watching this yesterday. It's only four "hour" episodes, and I've finished two. Very entertaining. Premise....young married woman escapes her Hissidic marriage and upbringing to go to Berlin to try and find her estranged mother.

    As a more secular Jew, there were things that the Hassids do that both fascinate and disgust me. But as with most ultra-religious sects, it become rigid, and narrow thinking. But learning about it is very interesting. I tried watching the other series about Hassids in Israel, but it just bored me. I find this much more interesting.
     
  2. gweempose

    gweempose Well-Known Member TCF Club

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    I haven't watched Unorthodox yet, but if you enjoy this subject matter, there is a documentary on Netflix called "One of Us". It follows three people who decide to leave the Hasidic community in NYC. I found it to be very enlightening, albeit quite sad.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2020
  3. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey TCF Club

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    I might have to look into it.

    I'm through episode 3 of 4 now. Still enjoying it.
     
  4. TonyTheTiger

    TonyTheTiger Pro Troll Magnet

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    I binged this last week. Thoroughly enjoyable - and based on a true story.

    There's a 'making of' show that's pretty interesting too.

    For example...

    The big fur hats were props as the real things cost upward of 1000 Euro each!
     
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  5. jehma

    jehma Well-Known Member

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    I watched it and found it fascinating. I’ll look for that documentary you mention!
     
  6. MScottC

    MScottC Well-Known Member

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    If you enjoyed Unorthodox check out Shtissel. The young lady star of Unorthodox is one of the primary characters in Shtissel. It's basically a soap opera/family drama with some comedy that takes place in the ultra-orthodox community of Jerusalem and its surroundings. Mostly Hebrew with some Yiddish thrown in, if you grew up like me, you'll almost be able to follow along without the sub-titles.
     
  7. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey TCF Club

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    I watched a few episodes of Shtissel, and it was too "soap operry" for me. I didn't realize the actress from Unorthodox was in Shtissel.

    I grew up in a house where my mom spoke yiddish as a second language and it was used mostly to say stuff in front of my sister and me so we wouldn't understand. But certain words and expressions from this show I was able to pick out. Still needed subs, but I followed a little of the dialogue. Another show, The Plot Against America, about a Jewish family living in an alternate WWII era US where a Fascist won the 1940 election used one one of my favorite Yiddish expressions as an episode title "Gay Cocken Oifen Yam" (not sure if I spelled that right), which means something like "Go take a 'poop' in the ocean", but is used to tell someone to "take a hike".
     
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  8. MScottC

    MScottC Well-Known Member

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    My folks too spoke Yiddish, just barely, to keep secrets from us kids.. I was the "Graisa" or "oldest", my sister was "the maidel" or "girl", my middle brother the "Roita" or "redhead" and my youngest brother the "kliena" or "kid." We all eventually knew our Yiddish nicknames, and even figured out what they were talking about.
     
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  9. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey TCF Club

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    My maternal grandparents spoke it fluently, and was their primary language (though they spoke a lot of English as well). My mom spoke it but probably didn't know everything. My dad could understand it, but couldn't speak it. Us kids understood a little bit and I know some words, still use them on occasion. My kids? Hardly any.
     
  10. jehma

    jehma Well-Known Member

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    My grandmother was fluent and would tell jokes and then tell the punchline in Yiddish and tell us kids “it doesn’t translate”. My dad spoke quite a bit (he went to yeshiva), but I don’t speak it other than some common words.
     
  11. jr461

    jr461 Well-Known Member

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    Same growing up for me. My parents spoke it only when they didn't want my sister or me to understand. Therefore we always knew when they were talking about us! They also didn't have the greatest command of Yiddish so some English would pop in and we were usually able to figure out the context as we got older.

    Lots of times they would say something funny in Yiddish that didn't translate as funny in English. Even though we didn't understand the words things sounded funnier in Yiddish.
     
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  12. Agatha Mystery

    Agatha Mystery Well-Known Member

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    I just watched the whole thing. It almost felt unfinished since we don’t know if she was accepted to music school.

    The poor education of them all is just unbearably tragic. Yanky runs to his mother as a grown man. He’s incredibly naive and childlike. No one teaches them foreplay so all sex is miserable. Moishe is just a disgusting man. Yanky cutting off his locks are going to upset his community.

    Since the show just stopped, we don’t get any resolution on the child and if the Rabbi and the elders are going to come for the baby like they came for Esty. It probably helps that she will give birth in another country. Legally makes it harder. We don’t get any resolution of what happens to Yanky and Moishe when they go back.

    It seems like there should have been at least one more episode. It’s not like the current time period is actually the author’s experiences or the story from the book. Only the past is true.

    I kept thinking that the actress playing Esty looks 12 most of the time (except when she was naked). It was quite distracting but fits with her youth I guess.

    There were moving parts to the show. The pure courage of Esty is amazing and made me tear up. She’s got a spine of steel under her fear. The show was quite educational for a non-Jew. I had to do some research. I knew about the wire but I didn’t realize it affected carrying bags.
     
  13. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey TCF Club

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    Just a quick comment about sex. For a lot of these communities, sex is just a means of procreation. You are not SUPPOSED to enjoy it, you are supposed to be making babies. Some of the Hassidic sects even put a sheet over the woman while they are having intercourse so that there's nothing "sexual" about it. And don't think the majority of Jews are like that. It's only small portion of Jews. Think of them in the same way as the ultra religious of any religion. That's what they are. Maybe closer to the Amish than the average Jewish person. I'm Jewish and I have grown up fairly close to the area where these people were in Brooklyn and I have had very little interaction with them.
     
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  14. MScottC

    MScottC Well-Known Member

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    Similar experience here. And add to that, while I became a Secular Jew, or a Jew who doesn't believe in god, my sister went in the opposite direction and became an ultra orthodox Jew. At one point, she even was close to marrying a "Rabbi" in a marriage made by a "Shiddach," the Yiddish term for a match. She did marry, but I'm not quite sure how that relationship developed. While Beth is observant, very observant, she is also very willing to accept my feelings, and accommodate others around her. When we were spending a lot of time together as my mother's death was imminent, we'd go out to eat, and she'd find ways to eat at restaurants that weren't Kosher, ordering salads etc., not forcing us to eat at a Kosher restaurant.

    We've had several conversations regarding the issues going on with the current pandemic, and thinks the groups that are having large gatherings are totally crazy. One of her community leaders passed away, and the funeral was totally social distancing. The funeral procession drove around the streets of their community, and mourners were advised to stay on their front porches as the procession passed by. As far as her and her community are concerned, the ultra orthodox who are ignoring the social distancing rules are really part of an extreme group, no different than the worst of the evangelical Christians.
     
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