Transfer rates between Series2 DVRs

Discussion in 'TiVo Home Media Features & TiVoToGo' started by plmurphy, Mar 12, 2005.

  1. plmurphy

    plmurphy AVISION TIVO

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    The transfer of programs is very very very slow. Yesterday I transfered one Law & Order show of 1 hour from one DVR to another--it took 6 hours. Huh? Apparently the obsolete wireless "b" standard used by TIVO is next to useless for transfering video between devices. Does anyone have an answer for improving wireless transfer rates?

    I use Linksys "G" router plus "G" cards in PC and Laptop. For the TIVO wireless, I am required to use the old "b" Linksys WUSB-12 adaptors(2) connected to the TIVOs.
     
  2. CrispyCritter

    CrispyCritter Purple Ribbon Wearer

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    What can I say? You have network problems. It's not the TiVo; lots of people get much higher speeds than you with "b" adapters. Lots of posts about looking at networks. Good luck!
     
  3. mgar

    mgar New Member

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    TiVo seems to be limited to about 4 mpbs transfer speeds. This is lower than the max 11 mpbs of "B". My wireless "B" TiVo transfers at the full 4 mbps speed with a signal strength of 50% to 60%.

    The problem is not with the wireless "B" standard, or the TiVo itself. Your problem is with your wireless network. Search other threads and use google to find solutions improve wireless network performance.
     
  4. David Platt

    David Platt Mouse Master TCF Club

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    If you want G speeds, you could just use plug a USB-to-ethernet adapter into a wireless G bridge instead of using the wireless B adapter.
     
  5. plmurphy

    plmurphy AVISION TIVO

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    Mar 12, 2005
    I use a Linksys Wireless G 2.4Ghz Broadband Router with "G" wireless connectivity to a Laptop and "wired" desktop with no problems. Both Tivo Series2 connect perfectly and can view each others "Now Playing List". The issue is one of transfering 'high quality" recorded programs between the units. A one hour high quality program takes at least 3hrs, if not 5-6 hrs. Unacceptable speeds.

    There is nothing wrong with my network. :)
     
  6. CrispyCritter

    CrispyCritter Purple Ribbon Wearer

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    I agree your speeds are unacceptable. But I don't know anybody with lots of networking experience who would claim "There is nothing wrong with my network" at this point in your investigation. Networks are treacherous beasts :) (I've been running home networks since the 1980's; and have been wrong about the network any number of times.)

    What are your TiVoToGo transfer times? The key now is to narrow down the problem to a single TiVo if possible. (If you want to skip all the intermediate steps, the last resort would be moving and directly connecting the two TiVos with a crossover cable. If you are still getting transfers at 3-5 times real-time, then I would believe it's not the network.)
     
  7. David Platt

    David Platt Mouse Master TCF Club

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    Didn't you say in your earlier post that your TiVos are connected via wireless B adapters? If so, then that is the bottleneck. Wireless B is simply too slow to move video files in anything appraching real time. As I already suggested, you need a normal USB-to-ethernet adapter and a Wireless G bridge if you're unwilling to run wires between the TiVo units.
     
  8. Georgia Guy

    Georgia Guy Early Adapter

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    Of course you don't want to hear this, but a wired high quality transfer for a one hour shows = 19 minutes, at least on my network. Medium 1 hour= 12 minutes.
     
  9. bobcarn

    bobcarn Birthday Hug Monkey TCF Club

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    I think you'll find good throughput if you get wireless bridges as opposed to wireless adapters. In upgrading my network at home, I wound up with a couple of Linksys Wireless B access points that weren't going to be used. I hooked them up in bridge mode. One is plugged into my wireless G/switch upstairs, the other into a hub downstairs. My Tivo just has a USB ethernet adapater so it can plug into the hub (along with my PS2 and a computer in the basement). The bridging mode of the access points seems to make a difference. It seems that when communicating in a native wireless mode, the Tivo ran much slower than when it communicated over an ethernet adapter, regardless of the fact that the ethernet adapter was plugged into a wireless bridge. Even though it's a B standard, the only shows that take longer than real-time to transfer are the ones recorded at Best Quality. And even then, a Best Quality show only takes an additional 30% time (a 1 hour show transfers in 1hr, 20min).

    I haven't examined wireless networking too closely, but I'm getting the impression that the PC/Tivo itself has more work to do with a wireless USB adapter, and Tivos are more fussy in general about it, than they would be with an ethernet adapater. Ethernet connectivity is pretty straightforward, so I'm seeing (from the posts here) that people are getting better throughput when their Tivo has an ethernet adapter hooked up to a wireless bridge, than when it's just a wireless adapater. I know it doesn't make much sense at first, but it seems to be a trend among the posts here (and with my own personal experiences).
     
  10. ComputerTech

    ComputerTech FAA Certified Pilot

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    802.11b = 11MB

    802.11g = 54MB

    Wired = 100MB <---- My personal choice!

    You do the math!

    I laughed when I first heard series 2 TiVo's were going to work with wireless B and now wireless G. I thought to myself, who in thier right mind would think of transfering video over wireless? Now it is even funnier that people are now complaining that their transfer speeds are slow. Maybe people don't realize how large a 1 hour video file is. Of course wireless is slow. It was never mint for transferring huge video files, only to easily browse the internet from the comfort of your lazy-boy.

    If you don't plan to use Multi-Room viewing or TiVo To-Go then wireless is a nice simple way for your TiVo to be on a home network. But if you are the type wanting to transfer video across your network, then take the time to install a wired network, all your problems will go away.

    (Hmmm...... Wonder if gigabit network adaptors are supported? Have to look into that..... If anyone knows let me know!)
     
  11. MusicMama

    MusicMama Member

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    As a networking slightly-more-than-newbie, could you please explain the difference between using a WAP as a bridge vs. just as a WAP? My TiVo is connected to a Belkin wireless USB adapter and it's slow but not as deadly as plmurphy's times - maybe 3 hours for a 2 hour High Qual movie. I can't do wired because the PC and the TiVo are a floor apart, but I do have a spare WAP (newly spare from finally getting a wireless router) - I would try this route but I don't understand "bridging". Can anyone recommend an easy-to-understand tutorial on this?

    Many thanks.
     
  12. Nicodemus

    Nicodemus New Member

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    Mar 15, 2005
    Could the bottleneck be the fact that it's going through USB? Or is the Tivo USB port USB 2.0?
     
  13. ComputerTech

    ComputerTech FAA Certified Pilot

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    After reading this post I wondered if the USB ports on the TiVo series 2 were version 1.1 or 2.0.

    According to the system specs. of the series 2 TiVo the 2 USB ports are "Type A" which is version 1.1

    If this is accurate it would explane why people are having so much trouble. USB 1.1 is only capaible of transfering at speeds of 12MB/s whereas USB 2.0 is able to transfer at speeds of 480MB/s

    Basicly it wouldn't matter wheather you used wireless type B or G, or even wired. If the USB ports are version 1.1 the maximume transfer speed is 12MB/s.

    TiVo reccomends using the Linksys USB200M adaptor for wired networks but if their USB ports are only version 1.1 it wouldn't make any difference, the maximum transfer speeds could only reach 12MB/s which is much slower that the full speed of wired network which transfers at 100MB/s

    After finding this information I called TiVo tech support to inquire about the USB port version and they conformed that the USB ports are version 1.1, BUT they guy also said he believed that TiVo Series 2 systems running their software version 7.1 would change the USB ports from 1.1 to 2.0 and inturn increase the transfer speeds from 12Mb/s to 480MB/s

    I had orginally thought USB versions were a hardwired and could not be changed with new software, so I will continue to research.

    If anybody else has some imput please let me know.
     
  14. ComputerTech

    ComputerTech FAA Certified Pilot

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    I have done some more research and talked to another person at TiVo tech support.

    As far as I can tell the USB ports are verson 2.0 if you are running version 7.1.

    The tech person I talked to this time was 100% sure the USB ports were version 2.0 and capible of transfuring at 480MB/s

    This is good news for people who are using wired networks. People who arn't I would shrongly reccomend takeing the time and effort to wire your TiVo.
     
  15. Nicodemus

    Nicodemus New Member

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    Mar 15, 2005
    Hmm.. this doesn't sound right to me. I believe the actual architecture of USB 2.0 itself is different from 1.1 and 1.1 cannot be upgraded to USB 2.0 through a software update.
     
  16. ComputerTech

    ComputerTech FAA Certified Pilot

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    That's what I thought. I believe the first guy I talked to didn't know what he was talking about.
     
  17. Nicodemus

    Nicodemus New Member

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    Mar 15, 2005
    Yeah, doesn't sound like it.. but hasn't USB 2.0 been around since 2001? It wouldn't make sense for newer Tivos to have USB 1.1 ports.

    Unless maybe the Tivo 4.x software only supported USB1.1 since maybe it was around before USB 2.0 and it was used only for programming updates, and the 7.x updates the driver since there is now a legitimate use for the increased speed?

    I dunno.. I just got my Tivo and I don't know that much about it yet, especially version history.
     
  18. CrispyCritter

    CrispyCritter Purple Ribbon Wearer

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    The relatively few early TiVo Series2 models beginning with 1 (eg (140)) have USB 1.1 hardware and nothing can change that to USB 2.0. The vast majority of TiVo Series2 models, whose numbers begin with 2 or 5 (240, 540, ...), have USB 2.0 hardware which is finally taken advantage of in 7.1 for the first time.
     
  19. Nicodemus

    Nicodemus New Member

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    Mar 15, 2005
    Ahh.. I see.. thanks for the help, Crispy.

    So would you happed to have any idea why the hell did it take damn near an hour for my Tivo to transfer a 30min show at High Quality with my USB 200M?

    I just got the 7 update, should I disconnect and reconnect my USB adapter? Wait that doesn't make much sense..
     
  20. fboner

    fboner New Member

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    Feb 28, 2005
    What does the rest of your LAN look like? Do you have 100BT connectivity throughout? What chipset was on the receiving end. A lot of things can impact the performance, even though USB2 is theoretically 480Mbps, 10/100 is typically max 80Mbps, the Tivo itself dies around 40-50Mbps..and so on

    Fred
     

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