TiVos should be able to play DVDs

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by DBCooper, Apr 22, 2008.

  1. BiloxiGeek

    BiloxiGeek DeleteAccount

    506
    1
    Nov 18, 2001
    DeleteAccount

    Advertisements

    Why would you need a 30 minute buffer when you're watching a DVD?
     
  2. DBCooper

    DBCooper New Member

    1,576
    0
    Aug 15, 2000
    Montgomery,...
    Because the controls on every DVD palyer I have ever seen are horrible. There is no 8-second jump, no way to easily ffw or backward at single/double/triple speed, and sometimes I would simply like to pause it and leave the room without fumbling through tiny buttons on the DVD remote.

    Part of the awkwardness of DVD controls comes from the medium itself. It's simply easier to implement these functions on a hard drive.
     
  3. slaponte

    slaponte The Iron Monkey

    568
    0
    Apr 6, 2005
    Miami, FL
    I have a Humax and I would buy a new Tivo/Blu-ray if it was available. Most people miss the space issue. My Humax is in my bedroom, where space is limited, so having the ONE device that does everything I need works perfect. Now in my living room I have multiple separate devices, but the Humax+dtv receiver is perfect for the bedroom.

    AND, i get to record some of the shows I want to save for later. :) I upgraded the HD and has been happy at work for 2+ years :)
     
  4. ZeoTiVo

    ZeoTiVo I can't explain

    25,527
    2
    Jan 2, 2004
    Not so. My ToShiba TiVo with DVD - plays the DVD with full TiVo trick play without using the hard drive at all.:up: sure they had to tweak it some to deal with how a DVD is formatted but that is behind the scenes.
    SO when I hit play I see the Full DVD play time as "buffer" and can skip to tick mark through the whole movie.


    NOw on the cheaper SD H400, since it has no burner, the DVD is just stuck in the box and there is no TiVo interface for DVD playback and the remote is the same 30 buttons just to run a DVD as other DVD player remotes. That kind of shove a DVD player in is not what anyone wnats in this thread.
     
  5. NoCleverUsername

    NoCleverUsername New Member

    969
    0
    Jan 28, 2005
    California

    Advertisements

    I think I had the same thought as BiloxiGeek that a DVD is more like playing a complete recording from Now Playing than watching Live TV, where the 30-minute buffer is necessary.

    FWIW, I have a Samsung DVD player (DVD-P231) that has instant skip and instant replay. It doesn't work nearly as well or reliably as on a TiVo but it was better than nothing, I suppose. This particular model was discontinued and I have no idea if they ever propagated the feature to other models.

    The other controls are basically the same as on any other DVD player, unfortunately.
     
  6. johnf@home

    johnf@home New Member

    260
    0
    Dec 1, 2007
    San Jose, CA
    I think that "another year" is a wildly optimistic estimate. I wouldn't expect
    to see a Blu-Ray player under $250 much before a year from now (especially since the precipitous free-fall of the dollar makes foreign-made goods ever more expensive).
     
  7. HerronScott

    HerronScott Well-Known Member

    7,505
    1,095
    Jan 1, 2002
    Staunton, VA
    My Sony DVP-NS725P DVD player has an instant replay and 4 levels of fast forward and rewind. On my universal remote which is TiVo-friendly (URC-6131) it's handy as I've got the TiVo 8-second replay button programmed for the DVD player's instant replay when it's operating in DVD-mode.

    Scott
     
  8. JaneiR36

    JaneiR36 New Member

    170
    0
    Oct 18, 2007
    What if one of the TiVo's existing inputs could read a DVD's output and just stream it to my TV as through I were watching a Live TV show? If they could figure it out, they might even be able to implement it using a Software update and it could potentially work on all existing TiVo boxes.
     
  9. ZeoTiVo

    ZeoTiVo I can't explain

    25,527
    2
    Jan 2, 2004
    many series 2 do not have component out -so the DVD would be downrezzed considerably. For some that would not be an issue. But for many it would be.

    also macrovision protection would scramble many of the DVDs.
     
  10. JaneiR36

    JaneiR36 New Member

    170
    0
    Oct 18, 2007
    I guess I don't understand this part, but if a TV could read the input and display it, I don't see why the TiVo couldn't.
     
  11. nrnoble

    nrnoble Active Member

    417
    33
    Aug 25, 2004
    I just want to say I love, and mean truly love, the TiVo remote. Most poorly designed remotes (nearly all other remotes) I must turn on the lights in the room, look at the remote to operate it.

    I have a TiVo with builtin DVD burner and I like it, but the record quality(s) is lower for some reason. I just have come to accept the lower quality and use that TiVo for stuff I want keep or take with me.
     
  12. ZeoTiVo

    ZeoTiVo I can't explain

    25,527
    2
    Jan 2, 2004
    The TV is not a recording device and thus does not need to check the macrovision license. The TiVo DVR is and does honor macrovision license- ironically mainly due to the DVD models of TiVo that needed the macrovision license for playback of DVDs. Also it is just part of TiVo playing nice with content owners and honoring the main licenses that are out there.
     
  13. JaneiR36

    JaneiR36 New Member

    170
    0
    Oct 18, 2007
    So when you said the idea wouldn't work because the signals would just come in scrambled, anyway, you really meant that TiVo wouldn't do that out of respect for the industry they're in. To that I say they could work on obtaining licences that would involve the minimum view-only functionality of this input. Basically dumb down the input viewing the DVD, only allowing perhaps the 30 minute buffer and no recording so that users could wait for a few minutes before starting to view the DVD and at least take advantage of the 30-second skip & 8-second rewind.

    I was able to get a DVD to show through my TiVo by hooking the DVD player to the composite input on my TiVo. Rather than use Basic cable mode, I ran the guided setup again and told TiVo I had a digital output setup box. The downside was it took forever to run the setup (as it always), and after a few hours the TiVo got wise to the fact that there wasn't a complex multi-channel cable signal coming in through Input 2 and started looking for both tuners again on the actual cable Coax [EDIT: This may have been working already. I just had to tune up to the digital channels where I could view the DVD]. I even got an RF modulator which I subsequently returned but I couldn't test as many cases as I wanted to because the guided setup took so long. All I really need is something to tell the TiVo what to look for on which input but you have to go through the 30-minute process as there isn't a simple button to do just that. Not on my Series 2 DT, anyway.

    Oh, and I tried one case that seemed like it would have kept on working... IF I were comfortable with sacrificing one tuner. Basically run the guided setup but tell it you have a box but you didn't connect it using the splitter as they recommended. It'll warn you that only one tuner will be functional for viewing and recording and such and I'm guessing it would just leave the second input alone from there on out.

    Personally, I don't see the problem with providing this functionality as people are ripping their DVD's and having to manually transfer them, anyway. At least this would provide a convenient view-only format and perhaps convince more people to just leave the data on the DVD where it belongs.

    hrm... apparently you have to tune to one of the fake digital channels to view the DVD (triple digits). I also found the "Video Hook-up" menu item which sorta seems to do what I need in lieu of a full setup everytime. I'll have to check back when both basic cable tuners are operational again. The DVD just might show permanently on the digital channels.

    EDIT (the 1000th one, actually): Both tuners are 100% operational. The fake box tuner will view go up to the digital numbers, on which you can view your DVD, while the Basic cable tuner will only view up to Channel 99 or whatever. I much prefer this to transfering the DVD to TiVo because I can keep my closed captions and Subtitles now!
     
  14. ZeoTiVo

    ZeoTiVo I can't explain

    25,527
    2
    Jan 2, 2004
    No - I meant they already had the macrovision license installed and running. If a DVD sends out the signal/license to not allow playback on a recording device then the signal will be scrambled on the TiVo. That is all I meant.
    TiVo does not need to spend the money to persue some downrezzed, real time recording of a DVD though. It is faster and you get a complete digital copy with no downrezzing to rip the DVD on a PC and then use toComeBack to transfer the resulting mpg to the TiVo.

    You do break the DMCA doing that on most DVDs so their is still a licensing concern but this leaves TiVo out of the loop on that and the MPAA is unlikely to come breaking down the door of someone doing that in heir own home.

    Their just is not a problem here that TiVo needs to solve :)
     
  15. JaneiR36

    JaneiR36 New Member

    170
    0
    Oct 18, 2007
    Ah. You did say many of the DVD's, for some reason I assumed all. Can you give me an example of a DVD that sends this signal so I can confirm it. I'll have it Netflixed and see if it doesn't work as I have described above. Coming to think of it, the composite input is labeled "DVD, Cable Box, etc" or something like that, I just didn't know how to operate it.

    I spent like an entire weekend trying to figure out transfer of a DVD to TiVo. I installed half a million software programs and each of them seemed to have a road-block of some sort. I was finally left deciding to pay for VideoRedo, and would have, if I knew whether to get the $50 or $75 version. The whole process kinda sucked and I still couldn't get my Closed Captions and subtitles to work... BTW, I'm not sure what consumed more of my time, actually working to rip and transfer the files or translating the instructions I read from a million websites into plain English.

    You'd be the same folks drooling over TiVo's "features" when and if they do... Good thing it seems to be fully operational if the composite input is available on one's TiVo unit.
     
  16. ZeoTiVo

    ZeoTiVo I can't explain

    25,527
    2
    Jan 2, 2004
    no real idea on specific ones- have not looked lately

    I have not worried about subtitles for my situation so I just use DVDshrink on most and DVDFab on the few stubborn ones. Simple download/install and run the program. I recall you need subtitles which does add a wrinkle. There was a thread in HME forum on that and forum member jmemmont (sp?) has done a lot of work in that specific area. PS - I do not think just straight up recording a DVD via an input would preserve the subtitles unless they were turned on already. Though again subtitles is not something I work with much. :)
    since I have a way to rip the DVD and use the new desktop 2.6.1 features to basically have a netflix queue of my movies right on the TiVo - it would in fact NOT be something I drool over
     
  17. JaneiR36

    JaneiR36 New Member

    170
    0
    Oct 18, 2007
    Yep! Turn 'em on and let the TiVo do the recording. If closed captions were available and the user preferred them, they could turn those on whenever they wanted. CC's are also lost in the Software conversions.

    I did follow those threads and eventually got a headache and gave up. I was going to eventually go back and try to learn some more but this thread helped me figure out another option!

    Cool. I myself prefer to leave the computer out of the equation. Also, as to your comment about a downrezzed, real time transfer, a) if a composite or component input is available, it would be viewed same as if you were watching a regualar DVD. In my case, those inputs were sitting idle because I only have basic cable and it used the RF input b) does toComeBack really transfer any faster than real time?

    The disadvantages I've found of transfering the DVD's as I've described are:

    1) Real time transfer ties up a tuner. Not a problem if you can find a spot when one of the tuners on the TiVo isn't recording anything. TiVo transfers on the other hand do not use up an actual tuner.

    2) Although I can set up a manual recording to pick up the DVD, the Title appears as whatever shows up on the Digital channel. ie I now have a recording titled Almost V*****s 4 on my TiVo. :D I'm going to go back and tell the TiVo I don't receive all but one of the "digital" channels, one that's family friendly...haha. I live alone but I'm not taking any chances!
     

Share This Page

spam firewall

Advertisements