TiVoHD and S3 users post your MRV transfer speeds

Discussion in 'TiVo Series3 HDTV DVRs' started by BlackBetty, Oct 23, 2007.

  1. bareyb

    bareyb Under Maintenance

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    Thanks for the response ciper. Some thoughts... I already own the two Airports so I won't have to buy them and I can't dump wireless because I need it for my laptop and the Airport in the living room is where I spend most of my time on the laptop. I suppose I could simply lose one of the AE's and ONLY use the one in the living room, but that would require a cable going to and from the AE in the living to my Switch.
     
  2. ciper

    ciper Active Member

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    Ahh I see. I meant dump wireless to the Tivo though, you can still use it for other devices.
     
  3. bareyb

    bareyb Under Maintenance

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    The TiVos are hardwired together through the Airport in the living room. The only wireless part of their path from the internet if between the two Airiports which would be removed by hardwiring the two Airports together.

    It has occurred to me that I can remove the Airport in the office and run cables to and from the Airport in the living room back to my switch in the office. One Airport would probably be enough with "N" enabled and I'd have a "Spare" in case the AE in the living room ever breaks...
     
  4. CuriousMark

    CuriousMark Forum Denizen

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    I don't know about Airport's but with every other wireless router with which I am familiar that support bridge mode, the two devices are NOT hardwired. They use the Wireless network to speak with each other and provide hardwired access to other devices on either side of the wireless link. (Basically you use a wireless bridge between two hardwired network segments, thus the name of the mode)

    If you have Ethernet at the location of the DVRs, I would think another gigabyte switch, or using the airport as a switch with its other features disabled would be what gives you the fastest transfers.

    Check postings by bedelman, he has a similar setup and has described it a time or two. You might even consider PMing him. Bob is very knowledgeable with Apple products and very helpful.
     
  5. bareyb

    bareyb Under Maintenance

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    Thanks Mark. The Airport in the living room would indeed be a "slave" only. It will basically act as switch but also broadcast wireless to that part of the house. The router in the office would supply the DHCP and NAT capabilities.
     
  6. ciper

    ciper Active Member

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    That or keep the office airport and run cables directly to the Tivo :)

    This is the correct use of the term "bridged" rather than stricly AP mode.

    This type of configuration is not typically referred to as a bridge. Rather you are converting the wireless router into an Access point. By far the easiest way to do this is to give the second airport a unique IP, disable its dhcp server and then connect a LAN port on the master airport to a LAN port on the slave unit leaving the WAN port on the slave unused.
     
  7. bareyb

    bareyb Under Maintenance

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    Thank you for the clarification. I'm obviously new at this and I don't know all the terms yet. I did not realize in access mode that you connect through the LAN port and not the WAN. Man I hope I don't burn something up... :D

    Speaking of being new at this... Upon further research I just discovered that with two Airports you can run one of them in "G" mode and the other one in "N" mode. This would be absolutely perfect if it works. My son's Wii uses "G" and my laptop uses "N"

    Can I do that? I assume the two routers would have to have different names on the network no? Is this a better scenario? And thank you for the advice. I'm really learning a lot here. :)
     
  8. ciper

    ciper Active Member

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    Don't worry. That way will work but its not ideal because the traffic is being "processed" twice on it's way to the internet. It can cause strange things to happen so change it to the LAN port if you can, you may need a cross over cable if they wont get a link.

    Speaking of being new at this... Upon further research I just discovered that with two Airports you can run one of them in "G" mode and the other one in "N" mode. This would be absolutely perfect if it works. My son's Wii uses "G" and my laptop uses "N"

    Can I do that? I assume the two routers would have to have different names on the network no? Is this a better scenario? And thank you for the advice. I'm really learning a lot here. :)[/QUOTE]
    Most N routers allow G connections. If you set both routers to have the exact same wireless settings EXCEPT CHANNEL it would allow you to roam seamlessly througout the house!
     
  9. bareyb

    bareyb Under Maintenance

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    According to one source I talked to, if you put the "Access Point" router into "OFF (Bridge)" mode, it turns the WAN port into a LAN port. If not, I can always plug in through the LAN port. I'd like to keep that last LAN port open if possible in case we get another TiVo. ;)

    So here's the tentative plan:

    1. Hardwire AE 1 to AE 2 through the WAN port.
    2. Setup AE 2 as a "Bridge" (turn off DHCP)
    3. Setup AE 1 to "Share a public IP"
    4. Give both routers the same network name and password.
    5. Setup one AE for "G" and one for "N 5Ghz"

    It would be ideal if this worked... It just seems a bit complex... :D
     

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