Tivo HD XL repair and resale options...

Discussion in 'TiVo Series3 HDTV DVRs' started by michaelkingdom, Feb 4, 2012.

  1. Feb 4, 2012 #1 of 13
    michaelkingdom

    michaelkingdom New Member

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    Hi,

    I have a HD XL that started going into infinite loop when we have a power outage. It gets stuck on the powering up loop. I have a lifetime subscription on it.

    I have purchased a new Tivo Premiere to replace it.


    Please help me choose the best course of action:

    A) Repair Tivo XL via Weeknees, etc. at an estimated $200 - $300 and then sell on eBay for $300-$400? (Profit = $0 - $200)

    B) Bury it in my backyard.

    C) Sell it as a broken unit on eBay?
     
  2. Feb 4, 2012 #2 of 13
    farmermac

    farmermac Recorder of shows

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    Jan 31, 2012
    sell as broken unit on ebay. It'll net more then $200, almost guaranteed.
     
  3. Feb 4, 2012 #3 of 13
    replaytv

    replaytv gun talk ignore list

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    Denver ish...
    I might be interested in it if you are in the Denver front range area
     
  4. Feb 4, 2012 #4 of 13
    shwru980r

    shwru980r Well-Known Member

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    Look for a used Tivo HD without lifetime service on Craig's List and swap out the drive with your lifetime Tivo.
     
  5. Feb 5, 2012 #5 of 13
    michaelkingdom

    michaelkingdom New Member

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    Jul 13, 2006
    Is the drive swap pretty easy -plug n play like computer drives?
     
  6. Feb 5, 2012 #6 of 13
    L David Matheny

    L David Matheny Active Member

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    If you do as shwru980r suggests, buying the exact same model TiVo (HD XL) with a good drive but no lifetime service off Craig's List (or eBay), then yes, you should be able to just swap drives and reboot. Because the TSN would have changed, you would then have to do a "Clear & delete everything" before you could record anything, but the unit should be fixed. Installing a larger drive in a TiVo is a bit more involved, but still not too difficult.
     
  7. Feb 5, 2012 #7 of 13
    unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    Swing by here and I'll help you bury it in my backyard, in a sturdy, waterproof container, no less.:)

    But seriously, the problem may very well be the hard drive, but it might not.

    Might be the cable to the drive has somehow managed to work its way loose.

    Might be a bad capacitor or two has made the power supply marginal, which can cause all sorts of symptoms.

    How do you feel about taking the top off of the unit?
     
  8. Feb 7, 2012 #8 of 13
    shwru980r

    shwru980r Well-Known Member

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    I thought the Tivo HD and HD XL used the same software.
     
  9. Feb 7, 2012 #9 of 13
    shwru980r

    shwru980r Well-Known Member

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    Yes.
     
  10. unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    No, they do not.

    That's why one version ends in 652 and the other version ends in 658

    You can boot one with the other one's software, but soon you begin having problems.
     
  11. unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    As far as the physical aspects it's the same, maybe even easier, since the data and power cable are joined together in one plug, it's easier to see what you're doing than inside a dark computer tower, etc.

    You'll need a #10 Torx driver instead of the screwdriver you could use with a computer, but you'll need it to open the TiVo case anyway. You take out the 4 screws that hold the bracket in place (keep track of which came out of which hole), then undo the 4 other screws holding the drive to the bracket (keep these separate from the other screws), remove the drive from the bracket, put the new drive on the bracket positioned the same way as the old one was, put the 4 drive screws back in, put the bracket in place, plug the cable assembly back into the drive and test it before you put the cover back on, remembering that the power supply is not separately enclosed like a computer's is, so keep yourself and metal away from it.

    Of course you already have to have the TiVo software properly loaded onto the new drive before physically installing it in the TiVo.


    If it all works like it's supposed to, triple check everything, like all the screws in the right places, etc., before you close it back up.

    And watch out that you don't even partially dislodge the cable(s) that go to the front panel.
     
  12. lillevig

    lillevig Cold in East Iowa

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    Dec 6, 2010
    Marion, Iowa
    If you're not afraid to poke around inside the box you can visually check the power supply and MB to see if there are any obviously fried parts. If the box was not on a good surge protector it might be toast. The other possibility is the hard drive. You can pull that, hook it to your computer, and run the maufacturer's disk tools on it.
     
  13. unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    Even with the best of surge protectors or UPSes, capacitors with the bad electrolyte formula will still probably go bad and make the power supply flaky.
     

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