TiVO Elite - Another gutless wonder

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by dcooper2025, Sep 7, 2011.

  1. rayik

    rayik New Member

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    Feb 4, 2006

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    You probably do not do internet streaming. Think of internet streaming as a giant DVR with tons and tons of available programs. Now combine that with OTA. There is no longer such a need to record OTA shows.

    Of course, we use a TIVO for OTA because we do want to record what is on. However, for 2nd or 3rd TVs in the house, no need to record on those sets and just the TIVO guide would be nice.

    No insult taken by your comment. :)
     
  2. rayik

    rayik New Member

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    Feb 4, 2006
    I'm with you all the way atmuscarella. We have the occasional glitches with OTA (particularly in stormy weather). However, the picture quality is great and most of what we were watching with Satellite is broadcast OTA. I agree a DVR is great to skip the commercials on OTA broadcasts.

    I don't know why, but there does seem to be a stigma attached with OTA. People I talk to uniformly are surprised you can get HD with OTA. They also seem to look at OTA as something you do only when you cannot afford satellite or cable.
     
  3. dlfl

    dlfl Cranky old novice

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    Dayton OH
    I am losing patients with your typos, sir! :D
    I think the $199 box you refer to is the Brite-View BV-980H (?). I looked into it a little just out of curiosity. It has a single tuner and a 320 GB drive. On the AVS forum thread concerning it I found a post stating the response of the program guide was extremely slow. It has no internet connection and gets the program info from the EPG data transmitted with the signal. Apparently when you scroll the PG it tunes each channel being displayed and re-loads the EPG data. This has the advantage of simpler, cheaper software and hardware and also ensures the PG data is always updated. This would seem to imply that you can't watch or record a channel and look at the PG simultaneously, which seems lame beyond belief. The other issue is that broadcast EPG is spotty, with quality varying a lot from station to station, according to other posts I've seen.

    I know this particular product wouldn't satisfy me just because it has only one tuner and I'm so spoiled by having 2 tuners for years with TiVo's. However I don't find it hard to justify paying way more than $200 for a better 2-tuner OTA PVR since it would eliminate the need for a TiVo subscription, not to mention the Cable TV bill.
     
  4. atmuscarella

    atmuscarella Well-Known Member

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    Rochester NY
    Ya auto correct gets me way to often.

    I have spent a great deal of time looking at all the OTA DVR options and for me I ended up with 3 HD TiVos. The savings going with the lower cost options have just never been worth it for me. However I do see a place for everything out there and would say people should look at them all.

    What I find interesting is what you get at various price points.
    1. $200 = single tuner VCR type DVR with No internet access
    2. $300 = dual tuner VCR tyle DVR with No internet access
    3. $400 = dual tuner VCR+ type DVR with Internet/smart TV access
    4. $400 +/- = used Series 3/TiVo HD with lifetime service & likely a hard drive upgrade.
    5. $470-$600 = New TiVo Premiere with lifetime service
    Not sure what the above says other than anyone who thinks a new Premiere could sell for $3-400 with lifetime is dreaming. Of course there is also the HTPC route which can run anywhere from maybe a low of $500 to however much someone wants to spend.

    Thanks,
     
  5. Bigg

    Bigg Cord Cutter

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    The content just isn't there on OTA. History, Discovery, CNN, MSNBC, Comedy Central, the list just goes on. There's not much on the networks anymore, and I have found that while most reality shows are over-produced and hyper-edited, the ones on the nets are quite a bit worse than the ones on Discovery and History. However, for someone who basically doesn't watch TV, I could see OTA being a good medium between not having TV at all and paying $78/mo for cable.

    However, OTA is a good backup. Over labor day I was home and my parents had no Comcast service (TV or internet) even though the power was restored after the storm, so I pulled out my little antenna, and after a few minutes of fiddling with it Voila! there was ~20 channels (including subchannels), so we could watch the local news and such. If I had an MCE box, I'd probably have OTA just to get additional tuners cheaply, have DRM-free content, and add some redundancy into the system.

    The price points may make no sense for OTA DVRs, as it is such a small market that devices like TiVo aren't targeted at that market.
     
  6. dlfl

    dlfl Cranky old novice

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    I'm curious what units fall into the "$400 = dual tuner VCR+ stype DVR with Internet/smart TV access" category? Not sure what you mean by "smart" but I would like to have season pass capability with ability to exclude reruns, as a minimum. Also, what means "stype DVR" ?

    Thanks
     
  7. atmuscarella

    atmuscarella Well-Known Member

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    Rochester NY
    The value of content is in the eyes of the beholder.

    I had Dishnetwork for close to a decade and I can count the number of times I watched shows on History, Discovery, MSNBC, & Comedy central on one hand. At the end about the only channels I was watching (beyond surfing) was SyFy, USA, & TNT.

    On the other hand my TiVos have about 80 season passes for OTA shows. Sure I didn't and will not watch all of them but I find more than enough to provide 2+/- hrs. of content per day (which is all the time I have to watch TV). Including more news than I can stand watching.

    Thanks,
     
  8. atmuscarella

    atmuscarella Well-Known Member

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    Rochester NY
    I sure seem to be having a bad typing day :eek:. AnywayI was talking about the soon to be released Channel Master one being posted about on various blogs and in several threads on this forum.

    The term "smart" is now being used to describe TVs, blu-ray players, & DVRs that can access Internet streaming media. As far as I can tell the term "Smart" doesn't have anything to do with the "Smart" DVR's actual DVR features (or in other words is really a marketing term).

    From all the reviews I have read it is still unclear how advanced the new Channel Master DVR's actual DVR features will be. I said VCR+ like because it looks like they will be more advanced than the current Channel Master OTA DVR but likely still significantly behind a TiVo's. We should know in a few weeks when reviewers actual get units to test.

    Thanks,
     
  9. johnf@home

    johnf@home New Member

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    San Jose, CA
    I agree. In fact the part of my TV viewing I could most easily do away with is the OTA stuff - the prime time shows we do watch show up on Netflix et al. fairly quickly, and the current season can usually be found on the network website.

    What I would find harder to replace is the cable channels (BBC America, Speed, Versus, and the like) that we watch for news and sports coverage. I didn't include SyFy or USA here, as they fall into roughly the same availability category as the OTA networks.

    For entertainment shows, I'm not too bothered if I'm a week (or even an entire season) behind. The same goes for movies, which is why I dropped almost all the premium channels several years ago and switched to Netflix.
     
  10. steve614

    steve614 what ru lookin at?

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    Yeah, I have come across several people who ask if I had seen <some show on cable> and then look at me funny when I say "I don't have cable".
    Any show that I care to see that is broadcasted on cable, I can get over the internet. It may be a season behind, but I can still get it.

    Matter of perspective. I've never paid for cable* so maybe I don't know what I'm missing.
    I am OTA only, and I record WAY more than I can watch.
    One example: I still have 4 seasons of Supernatural to get through.
    As stated above, I can get other shows I care about via other means, but those are very few. The vast majority of what I watch comes from the OTA networks.

    * I did have basic cable once when a "friend" illegally hooked me up. The extra channels were a nice addition, but I didn't miss them when they went away.
     
  11. Bigg

    Bigg Cord Cutter

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    Yeah, Discovery is probably the worst in terms of online licensing for stuff. There is almost nothing from them in HD online. A lot of the cable stuff too is a little farther down the curve, so to speak, so it's not always as available (or available at all) online, since there's not as much of a push to get it up as there is for a lot of the network stuff.
     
  12. mattack

    mattack Well-Known Member

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    Except:
    (1) Shows aren't available on Internet streaming forever (e.g. just last night I tried to find an episode of Parks & Recreation from this season that had the VERY VERY end cut off.. I don't really think I missed any dialogue, but I was willing to let it play through the ads a few times so I could skip to the end to actually make sure.. but that episode wasn't available anymore)... Especially not for free (i.e. commercial supported).

    (2) Similar, but you can't get shows "without" commercials (i.e. skip over commercials), at least not for "free" (already recorded them).

    I'm turning off Netflix streaming (due to the price increase), but if they had all primetime network shows, even a year after originally airing (e.g. similar to what I did for HBO shows, wait for the DVD), then I would kind of agree with you.
     

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