Their may be no more qam

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by caddyroger, Nov 29, 2011.

  1. caddyroger

    caddyroger New Member

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    Some where...
    The fcc may let the cables com scramble all the stations.

    http://www.multichannel.com/article/477203-NCTA_to_FCC_Let_All_Digital_MSOs_Encrypt_Basic_Tier.php

    The National Cable & Telecommunications Association has urged the Federal Communications Commission to allow cable operators that have gone all digital to encrypt their basic tier.

    That came in comments Monday on the FCC's proposal to do just that. "Given the substantial public interest benefits and the lack of harms associated with encryption, NCTA endorses the Commission's tentative conclusions and urges it to act expeditiously in amending its rules," according to the cable organization.

    It added that allowing basic encryption would largely eliminate theft of service, promote innovation and investment, and reduce polution and fuel consumption by reducing truck rolls to activate or deactivate service (NCTA said Monday that the benefits would outweigh the minimal extra watts consumed by new boxes).

    Cable operators also argued that the competition has no similar ban on encryption. "When the encryption rule was adopted in 1994, cable was the dominant MVPD, and there were few competitors," said NCTA. "The situation is dramatically different today. DBS and telco IPTV providers -- each requiring set-top boxes for each of their subscribers -- serve approximately 40% of the marketplace with all-digital service on a fully encrypted basis. Likewise, online video distributors deliver video to customers on an encrypted basis. Netflix alone has 23.8 million subscribers, more than any MVPD. None of these video providers is barred from encrypting or otherwise protecting the content they provide to their customers."
    As Multichannel News first reported back in October, FCC chairman Julius Genachowski proposed allowing all cable operators to encrypt digital basic channels, given that the TV industry is going all-digital and that the move would had consumer, environmental and theft-protection benefits.

    The commission officially voted Oct. 13 to propose that change and put it out for comment. "We tentatively conclude that allowing cable operators to encrypt the basic service tier in all-digital systems will not substantially affect compatibility between cable service and consumer electronics equipment for most subscribers," the commission said. The FCC has already granted several waivers -- most prominently to Cablevision -- and more are in the hopper from cable operators.

    The FCC conceded there was an issue with consumers with basic-only digital who accessed it without set-tops, or second or third sets without digital boxes that would now need new equipment to unscramble a signal. It proposed adopting the conditions it put on the waiver it gave Cablevision to encrypt its basic service in New York.

    Those conditions include requiring cable operators to offer "current basic-only subscribers up to two set-top boxes or CableCARDs without charge for up to two years, (b) digital subscribers who have an additional television set currently receiving basic-only service one set-top box or CableCARD without charge for one year, and (c) current qualified low-income basic-only subscribers up to two set-top boxes or CableCARDs without charge for five years." But it also asked whether this was adequate of whether the Cablevision time frames are appropriate.

    NCTA had some tweaks to the language of those conditions, but said it had not quarrel with their substance.


    edited to correct link
     
  2. wmcbrine

    wmcbrine Well-Known Mumbler

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    Outrageous. :mad:
     
  3. caddyroger

    caddyroger New Member

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    Some where...
  4. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    So this basically makes it so they are guaranteed to charge an "outlet fee" for every TV in your house. Another rate hike disguised as preventing theft.

    Dan
     
  5. smbaker

    smbaker Well-Known Member

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    Ouch. This totally renders moot my "QAM Mapping Letter Writing Campaign" thread from like 4 years ago that was so wonderfully successful.

    Curiously, how does encrypting basic service "reduce truck rolls" and "curb pollution"? Seems to me it would do the opposite.
     
  6. billyjoebob99

    billyjoebob99 Member

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    To turn on or off basic service now requires a tech to connect or disconnect the physical cable. Encryption allows them to turn on or off the device from the office.
     
  7. unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    I wonder how much of their profits come from selling the signal and how much come from the stuff they do their best to force you to rent?

    I'll bet the thought that some people watch television for free just by hooking a set of rabbit ears to a receiver has them sobbing into their pillows at night at the unfairness of it all.
     
  8. slowbiscuit

    slowbiscuit FUBAR

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    That's the way I see it too, and not surprisingly the FCC says nothing about capping these fees for basic-only subs. So long to getting your local HDs in the clear on secondary sets unless you pay the toll.
     
  9. Sapphire

    Sapphire Xtal substance

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    One word: Antenna.

    Get an antenna.
     
  10. HomieG

    HomieG Nowhere Man...

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    There will likely still be QAM. There may not be in-the-clear QAM.
     
  11. classicsat

    classicsat Astute User

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    Strictly, equipment rental is a loss leader. Their profits are in the services. They have to rent equipment to be in control of it.
     
  12. smbaker

    smbaker Well-Known Member

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    Yes, but they now have to distribute equipment to all these basic cable users, and the equipment needs to be collected when the account is terminated.
     
  13. unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    A bit surprising.

    Back when there were a lot of "cable ready" TVs and VCRs that only went up to channel 36, they had CNN on 27 but moved it up to 47 and left a lot of the channels below 36 empty, and I always assumed it was to force people to rent the cable box, which was not included in the price at the time.
     
  14. jtso

    jtso Member

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    In my house, we have 5 TVs and only one cable box. For the 4 non-cable box TVs we are content with the analog tier of channels plus OTA on one TV and clear QAM for the others. If clear QAM were eliminated we would have to get additional cable boxes (at least 3). In the kitchen, because of space limitations and a WAF consideration, there is no place to put a cable box. It would be somewhat better if there was a "Bring Your Own Box" possibility (such as a retail TiVo Preview).
     
  15. Adam1115

    Adam1115 Well-Known Member

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    Denver ish
    I don't see the problem. Theft of service IS a big concern, and I'm not sure why it's some 'right' to be able to plug in as many TVs as you want for free....
     
  16. unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    If I'm paying for 24/7 access to both CNN and MSNBC I should be able to access them simultaneously at no extra charge.
     
  17. jcthorne

    jcthorne Well-Known Member

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    I'll go one further, If I was paying for 24/7 access to CNN its is no business nor should there be an extra charge for me to choose to watch it in the Kitchen or the Bedroom or both. I PAID for the programming.

    I really should sit this one out, I gave up on CATV as a media distibution means years ago.
     
  18. jtso

    jtso Member

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    My cable company does allow customers to use splitters to serve different rooms in the house, and they provide clear QAM as required by law (until it is changed) and I pay the cable company to provide this service. So this is not for free - I'm taking full advantage of what is offered.
     
  19. atmuscarella

    atmuscarella Well-Known Member

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    Yeb Time Warner is running triple play adds again for $90 including a free DVR. Kind of hard for any third party STB/DVR supplier to compete with that.
     

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