Spectrum 400 mbps question...

Discussion in 'TiVo Help Center' started by siratfus, Feb 1, 2019.

  1. Feb 1, 2019 #1 of 58
    siratfus

    siratfus Active Member

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    It's that time of the year for me. I'm switching from Fios back to Spectrum. This time I have less headache because 2 yrs ago you guys taught me how to use my Fios Gateway router with my Spectrum modem so I can take advantage of my moca adapters. This was the thread.

    Since that thread, I did go back to Frontier/Verizon Fios, but now I have to go back to Spectrum and, and I used that thread to freshen my memory on how to hook everything up, and everything is working AOKAY! All my Tivos are working fine!

    But I have a question regarding speed. When I hook my PC by ethernet directly to a port on the Fios Gateway router, Speedtest.net shows me blazing, it even went over 400, close to 500 mbps. But when I'm on wifi, I get only between 80-100 mbps. This was also the case with Frontier Fios, i would get better speed by ethernet, but by wifi, it would also be in the 80-100 range. Never bothered to ask why, and now I'm seeing the same thing with Spectrum, and I wondering is this normal? My network adapter on my pc is a 10/100/1000. But being on wi-fi, should it drop that much?
     
  2. Feb 1, 2019 #2 of 58
    ThAbtO

    ThAbtO TiVoholic by the bay TCF Club

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    Its all normal, even the wifi. Wireless N is only up to 50mbps, Wireless AC is 2x that.
     
  3. Feb 2, 2019 #3 of 58
    krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    Wireless speed also depends on the number of antennas in each device...

    WiFi is always promoted using ‘theoretical’ speeds and by this standard 802.11ac is capable of 1300 megabits per second (Mbps) which is the equivalent of 162.5 megabytes per second (MBps). This is 3x faster than the typical 450Mbps speed attributed to 802.11n.

    The problem is these speeds are garbage. In the real world no-one ever gets close to theoretical speeds and the fastest 802.11ac real world speeds recorded in testing are around 720Mbps (90MBps). By contrast 802.11n tops out at about 240Mbps (30MBps) so the 3x estimate is still true, just much lower.

    This is another bottleneck. If your glorious four antenna 802.11ac router is connecting to your single antenna 802.11ac smartphone then 400Mbps (50MBps) is your theoretical maximum and 200Mbps (25MBps) is the more realistic one.

    802.11ac vs 802.11n WiFi: What's The Difference?
     
  4. Feb 2, 2019 #4 of 58
    krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    The Ethernet interface for your PC is likely a separate component from its wireless interface. They should both be listed in Device Manager as separate network devices. Also, how many antennas does the wireless card have attached?
     
  5. Feb 2, 2019 #5 of 58
    windracer

    windracer joined the 10k club

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    Funny, I just upgraded to Spectrum 400mbps internet (from 100mbps) the other week so I had to replace my self-purchased SurfBoard SB6141 with the Spectrum-provided E31T2V1. Since it was a self-install I had Spectrum on the phone during the activation and the tech specifically asked me to confirm I was doing the speedtest over wired and not wireless. Apparently they have a lot of people complain about not getting the speeds they are paying for because they're testing on wireless and don't realize the limitations.
     
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  6. Feb 2, 2019 #6 of 58
    ThAbtO

    ThAbtO TiVoholic by the bay TCF Club

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    With ATT, I could upgrade to 1000mbps but it cost about $80 month (IIR) with unlimited data, same gateway/optic. I just don't need that speed.
     
  7. Feb 9, 2019 #7 of 58
    siratfus

    siratfus Active Member

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    Hey Guys, I got a question regarding moca adapter. I had spectrum turn off wifi so I can use my own router, the G1100 because of it's built in moca. I got a router from Spectrum that's just sitting there, and they won't reduce my price since it was considered "free."

    I'm thinking of asking them to turn on wifi again, so I can use their router and just sell my G1100.
    How does the Hook-Up go since the Spectrum router doesn't have a coaxial input? Please let me know if this sounds right, and keep in mind the modem and router are separate devices:

    1. Coaxial from wall into Moca Adapter coaxial IN.
    2. ADAPTER's coaxial OUT to Spectrum Modem's coaxial IN.
    3. LAN from Moca Adapter connects to LAN in Spectrum Router?
    4. The LAN port on the Modem is left unplugged, correct?

    Please advise, thanks.
     
  8. Feb 9, 2019 #8 of 58
    krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    Sounds correct. The MoCA adapter coax port labels will vary based on product. (e.g. The MM1000's "Network" and "Device" are the equivalent of your "IN" and "OUT") Of course, some MoCA adapters lack an "OUT" pass-through port.
     
  9. Feb 9, 2019 #9 of 58
    siratfus

    siratfus Active Member

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    Great! You are right, I have both actiontec and motorola and the motorola ones say NETWORK and DEVICE. The motorola instructions confused me because their illustrations shows the lan from the adapter connects to the modem, but I guess that's for all in one modems/router?

    So in my situation, the empty lan port on my modem, if I choose to, I can connect a ethernet hub to it and make use of it?
     
  10. xberk

    xberk Active Member

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    >>I got a router from Spectrum that's just sitting there, and they won't reduce my price since it was considered "free."

    Here's how I have my MOCA setup. I own the MODEM and the ROUTER. If you have a Spectrum Modem you can return it and save on your cable bill. I did. I bought a Arris Surfboard SB6183 (it was on the approved list at Spectrum). I already had a nice ASUS router. I Hooked everything up as in the diagram below and once satisfied it was working well, returned the Spectrum Modem/Router equipment and saved on my bill. Take care that the modem will do the top internet speed you have.

    Generally, Spectrum combines the router and modem in the same unit. If you already have a router you like, then this might be an option to save money.

    [ MOCA Publication4.png
     
  11. siratfus

    siratfus Active Member

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    Also, am I correct to think that since the Gateway G1100 router is Moca 2.0 but unbonded, it's capping my wireless transfer data rate at around 450 mbps? That's part of my motivation for removing it and using my motorola 2.0 bonded adapter. If I choose to keep using the G1100 and connect a moca 2.0 bonded adapter to it, will I get the boost in speed?
     
  12. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    ... or will want to have during whatever ROI window you're projecting.

    It'd also be unfortunate if a provider bumped-up speeds, gratis, but one's modem prevented attaining the new rates.
     
  13. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    Likely, yes. An unfortunate result of the term "modem" becoming less defined, even with the hardware vendors.

    I can't say, not knowing what your specific setup is and what you mean by "modem." Traditional definition ... a hard no, since a modem lacks any LAN connection; a broadband modem simply supplies a WAN connection to a secondary device, either a single computing device or a home network router. All LAN connectivity must be through the router, either wired or via any built-in access points.

    Not knowing your setup, I don't see how your wireless rates would be affected by MoCA.

    Borrowing a general reply from over on SNB Forums...
     
  14. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    p.s.
    The MoCA LAN component of the G1100 will only affect the rate of connection between other MoCA nodes and the G1100; it will have zero effect on your wireless speeds ... unless you're using MoCA to provide a wired network connection for one or more remote wireless access points. The MoCA LAN component of the G1100 has zero relation to the wireless speeds you see for wireless devices connecting directly to the G1100 via wireless.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
  15. siratfus

    siratfus Active Member

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    I'm not sure I understand, nor am I sure I properly articulated my issue. My NAS is in my garage connected to an ethernet hub that is connected to a Moca adapter, ECB2500C. When I transfer files from a PC that's also connected to the same ethernet hub in the garage, I can get 100 MB/s. But when I transfer files by wifi, I get about 10 MB/s. When I switched out the ECB2500C for the Motorola MM1000, wifi file transfers got a nice boost, around 44 MB/s. Which is the same as 440 mbps, right? That number falls around the limitations of the G1100. Is there a correlation here? If I remove the G1100 router and go back to using Spectrum's router along with another MM1000, will I get close to 100 MB/s via wifi? BTW, the router and modem are in a different location, not in garage.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
  16. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    1 byte = 8 bits; so 44 MB/s = 352 Mbps; and 10 MB/s = 80 Mbps

    352 Mbps is near the expected effective throughput for a standard MoCA 2.0 connection (where 3+ MoCA nodes are present, precluding TURBO mode), 400 Mbps — with the G1100’s built-in MoCA bridge likely the limiting factor.

    The ECB2500C is a MoCA 1.1 adapter, where MoCA 1.1 is capable of up to 150-170 Mbps; unfortunately, Actiontec only included a Fast Ethernet port, so its max throughput is capped to 100 Mbps (12.5 MB/s).

    I guess I don’t understand why you’re bringing wireless into the discussion, if you’re evaluating changes only to the wired infrastructure. And you may want to use iPerf or some other LAN speed testing utility to avoid possible hard drive throttling of results.

    That said, a pair of bonded MoCA 2.0 MM1000 adapters, where other MoCA nodes are present on the coax, could see throughput up to 800 Mbps (100 MB/s). I don't know what you'll see via a wireless connection, as there are many variables that can affect the wireless throughput (wireless standard, number of antennas, distance, interference, competition, ...).
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  17. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    With Gigabit being 1000 Mbps, the switch connection should offer up to 125 MB/s.
     
  18. siratfus

    siratfus Active Member

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    So I just went through the process of removing my G1100. I called spectrum to activate wife so I can use their router again. I hooked up the moca adapter just as descibed in post #7 above, but it's not working.

    1. Coaxial from wall into Moca Adapter coaxial IN.
    2. ADAPTER's coaxial OUT to Spectrum Modem's coaxial IN.
    3. LAN from Moca Adapter connects to LAN in Spectrum Router?
    4. The LAN port on the Modem is left unplugged, correct?

    #3 seems to be an issue. It kills the internet. But if I disconnect the ethernet from the adapter, and let it go from modem to router, then internet comes back. But then I guess I'm not getting moca to my other coaxials because when I install the other moca adapter, it doesn't get internet. Any clues?
     
  19. ThAbtO

    ThAbtO TiVoholic by the bay TCF Club

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    1. You should have splitter, 1 leg - Router Lan, other leg - MoCa IN
    2. Do not use the MoCa adapter's OUT.
    3. Correct.
    4. If modem and router are 2 separate devices, they need to be connected. EX: modem's LAN to router's WAN.
     
  20. siratfus

    siratfus Active Member

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    Yes, I have two separate devices. The modem has a coaxial IN, the router Does not. So you're saying split the coaxial, one goes into modem, one goes into moca adapter. Ethernet from lan on modem to wan on router? So we leave the ethernet port on the moca adapter empty?
     

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