Simple features TiVo should have, but doesn't

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by Dan203, Sep 29, 2011.

  1. Oct 4, 2011 #101 of 122
    innocentfreak

    innocentfreak Well-Known Member

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    Depends on which order you mean ;). Not all shows are actually shown in order even as first run. Of course some argue whether aired order is the actual order or whether you should go by DVD order.
     
  2. Oct 4, 2011 #102 of 122
    Fofer

    Fofer Bo55man69

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    Well, I'm sure there are exceptions (blah blah blah Firefly) but my point was, the vast, vast majority of the shows I've watched in my lifetime have aired in order.
     
  3. Oct 4, 2011 #103 of 122
    mr.unnatural

    mr.unnatural Well-Known Member

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    Ellicott...
    How do you know for sure? News shows are generally live so there's no order to mess with. However, shows like 60 Minutes or 20/20 have definitely aired out of sequence over the years. The order you've seen other shows aired is the order in which they were broadcast and has nothing to do with the episode number.

    A prime example of this is The Simpsons. The storylines are not sequential so they're aired in whatever sequence the broadcaster sees fit to show them. Shows that have a serial plot will be more likely to air in episode order, but even that's not locked in concrete. Continuing stories can be aired out of sequence when individual episodes can stand alone but add to the overall story as a piece of the puzzle.

    Listing episode numbers are fine as part of the metadata but they have no specific impact on the order a series of programs are actually aired. The original air date is a much more meaningful tidbit of information for knowing the sequence in which the episodes were shown.
     
  4. Oct 4, 2011 #104 of 122
    aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    Northern...

    I ndon't use the MS time servers. I use the federal government ones.
     
  5. Oct 4, 2011 #105 of 122
    Fofer

    Fofer Bo55man69

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    I know for sure, at least with the shows I watch, because the shows I watch have continuous narratives, with storylines and character development, and wouldn't make any sense if they were viewed out of order.

    Well, I'd say the episode numbering scheme is intended by the show's creators as the order in which the show was meant to be viewed, wouldn't you? Why else would they number them that way?



    Regardless, it would be nice if the TiVo's NP list could be sorted in any number of ways… by name, by date recorded, by episode number, whatever.
     
  6. Oct 4, 2011 #106 of 122
    Fofer

    Fofer Bo55man69

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    mr.unnatural, you should do this too. Then maybe you won't need 12 tuners in your Windows HTPC to make up for your clock "drift."
     
  7. Oct 4, 2011 #107 of 122
    Jonathan_S

    Jonathan_S Well-Known Member

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    I'm pretty sure I've seen that when canceling a suggestion that's recording...
    But whether or not I have I'd like this feature; really it shouldn't scare people if TiVo gives them more than 2 options occasionally.
     
  8. Oct 4, 2011 #108 of 122
    unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    Finally, something on which we agree.:)
     
  9. Oct 4, 2011 #109 of 122
    unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    In that scenario, episode number would probably work as well as, if not better than, synopses.
     
  10. Oct 4, 2011 #110 of 122
    unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    On my S1s and S2s, if what's in the buffer is the last 29 minutes of the previous show and the first minute of the currently scheduled one, hitting record causes it to start the recording and reset the beginning of the buffer to one minute ago.

    In other words, if I want to see that 29 minutes I have to "rewind" and watch before hitting record or it gets flushed.
     
  11. Oct 4, 2011 #111 of 122
    lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    San...
    Well, even I did not think Microsoft was quite that incompetent, but it seems it may be the case. When I put the MS NTP server in my ntp server's peer list, it doesn't respond. Interestingly enough, when I first looked up the first link you provided, I was using one of my company-owned PCs, which run Windows and Internet Explorer. That link crashed IE without fail.

    I do agree the TiVo should run NTP. That's why all three of mine do. Frankly, there is no excuse for TiVo not to run NTP. Its resource requirements are insignificant, and it is open source. That's one more thing TiVo could implement with essentially zero development costs.
     
  12. Oct 4, 2011 #112 of 122
    unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    So S1 and S2 TiVos could have done it, but TiVo didn't bother to write the software that way?

    I sometimes get the impression that no one at TiVo had any experience actually watching network and cable TV.

    If they had, there'd be a special button on the remote specifically for dealing with the "60 Minutes" on the East Coast on Sundays when there's golf or football first problem.

    Or maybe the problem is none of them had any experience with watching TV in the Eastern time zone.
     
  13. Oct 4, 2011 #113 of 122
    unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, but think how great it would have been if everyone had watched "Firefly" in the proper order instead of the braindead Fox executive designated order.
     
  14. Oct 4, 2011 #114 of 122
    lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    San...
    At my house I use three Debian pool servers, one NIST server, and 3 university servers, plus both Linux servers broadcast on the local LAN. At work we maintain a couple of dozen GPS based Stratum I servers across the country.
     
  15. Oct 4, 2011 #115 of 122
    lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    I'm afraid not. You are correct the I frame is basically an entire image, but the rest of the frames are not P frames. Most are B frames. P frames are essentially a simple differential from the previous frame. A B frame, on the other hand, is created based upon differentials from both the previous and following frame. A stream of B frames is generally more compressible than a string of P frames, plus when rewinding, decoding B frames is faster and smoother than decoding P frames. The calculations required to produce a B frame, however, are more in-depth, than a P frame, and some transitions do not readily yield B frames without lots of calculations. Pulling up a fairly typical MPEG2 video (Air Force One), I'm looking at about 2 B frames for every P frame.

    That would be pretty unusual. The DVD spec calls for a GOP to be no more than 18 frames, total. MPEG2 in general does not require this, but few sources will attempt to cram much more than 2 - 3 seconds worth of frames into a GOP.

    Not at all. First of all, it is trivial to duplicate a single GOP to be shared by both videos. Secondly, even if one wishes to split the videos precisely on a single frame, re-creating an I-Frame at the new GOP boundary is not a hugely CPU consuming procedure. I suspect the TiVo may already do something like that when starting a new video.
     
  16. Oct 4, 2011 #116 of 122
    johnd01

    johnd01 Member

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    How about making some of the consistence soft?
    like:
    buffer length,
    Skip forward
    skip back
    30 second skip
    FF exit reverse amount

    There are times I would like to be able to skip 6 seconds forward. How about when your are FF the skip back is a little more than I like. I do try to wait so when it skips back I do not FF to get to the show.

    Non trivial: Good revers slow motion. How did the ball get there. My first VCR did slow motion revers better than anything else I have seen.

    cooperative recording and cooperative now playing. Just team work between all the Tivos on the network.
     
  17. Oct 4, 2011 #117 of 122
    Fofer

    Fofer Bo55man69

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    Oh my, I HATE IT when this happens! I see something I am interested in, I hit record to preserve it, and then it does the exact opposite -- it gets rid of the buffer! It doesn't happen all that often but when it does, I get very annoyed with TiVo. This should be handled much more intelligently.
     
  18. Oct 4, 2011 #118 of 122
    Fofer

    Fofer Bo55man69

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    This is a depressing thread. I'm reading all of these basic user interface/experience issues that I'd have expected to see in TiVo's OS like… 5 years ago. The fact of the matter is, there's been so little in terms of enhancement or development for us to really see. The OS is stagnant.

    And the add-ons are just languishing, broken and unsupported. The YouTube app can't even handle our playlists properly. This is a bug that's been reported for 2 years now and TiVo just can't/hasn't fixed it. Sure, a new YouTube app might be coming down the pike. Maybe, maybe not.

    I get the impression that all of TiVo's engineers left long ago, and no one knows how (or wants) to touch the code for fear of breaking something. I have this picture of empty offices… with a few suits here and there, maybe a handful of misguided interns… but no one actually employed and capable of improving the actual TiVo OS. Everything (aside from the iPad app, developed externally AFAIK) seems to be on life support, waiting for the plug to be pulled.

    And so it's sad to read the wishes in here because I can't help but shake the sneaking suspicion that we'll never see any of them realized.
     
  19. Oct 5, 2011 #119 of 122
    mr.unnatural

    mr.unnatural Well-Known Member

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    Ellicott...
    It does seem logical that they would air this way, but the fact remains that not all shows air in the same sequence as their episode number. The episode numbering scheme is nothing more than a sequence in which each episode was produced. For shows that have an ongoing storyline, such as the type you described, they generally do air in this order. Shows like The Simpsons are produced independently of one another and the air date probably depends more on when the episode is ready to be aired rather than some numbering sequence they use to identify each show.

    The 12 tuners are not there to make up for any clock drift but rather to avoid any possible conflicts between recordings. I had intended to set up the additional Ceton tuners for sharing with other PCs to be available to other TVs in my house. I just haven't gotten around to setting up the additional PCs for this function yet. I think the most shows I've recorded simultaneously via my season passes in WMC has been about 6. The overlap is intended to compensate for any program guide glitches that haven't been updated prior to recording any given program.

    Based on what I've been reading here, I do intend to look into a clock synchronization app for my HTPC. I'm not so much concerned about the clock drifting and hosing up any recordings. I just want the actual time to be displayed on my TV. Any time I hit the PLAY button on my remote the time is displayed in the upper right hand corner of my TV while in Media Center.
     
  20. Oct 6, 2011 #120 of 122
    MichaelK

    MichaelK Active Member

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    it actually keeps the buffer to the beginning of the "chunk" that happens to contain the actual beginning of the show. It flushes the other chunks but not the the partial chunk in front of the start time. It's possible that is exactly at the beginning of the show but more likely it's several minutes before the beginning of the show.

    Others here more knowledgeable can explain the tivo file system and its implications (it's mostly over my head) but basically Tivo records in chunks (length of time of the chunk depends on bitrate and the like) - and the start time of the chunks in the buffer start at seemingly random times since the duration of each chunk if variable. The tivo apparently has no way to cut off the extra part of the chunk it doesn't need when you start an unplanned recording from the buffer. So it marks the beginning of the recording and starts from there when you play it from the NPL but if you rewind you can see the rest of the chunk.

    Bottom line they can mark the start time in a file that starts before the start time and the UI starts playback from there.


    ***disclaimer- unless things have changed. I believe i first discovered on my S2's but may have been as early as S1's
     

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