Series 3 Tivo

Discussion in 'TiVo Series 1 - UK' started by magistral, Sep 12, 2006.

  1. Sep 26, 2006 #81 of 109
    Pete77

    Pete77 New Member

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    We had a substantial "Tuck Shop" at both the prep school I attended and the public school that followed it both of which were day and not boarding schools. I seem to recall loading up on the Mars bars and the crisps to compensate for the lousy meals which I did not eat much of.

    You could get eight Black Jacks or Fruit Salad chewies for 1p back in 1973 (a Mars was I think 3p back then) but if they still exist I expect its now a question of how many pence for one Black Jack.

    As to the school meals well they were thrown in as part of the fees and no doubt on some inadequate budget that caused them to be gruel like. But of course the Tuck Shop was a further profit centre so the more sweets the kids chose to buy there due to the inadequate lunches the more extra money the school made................
     
  2. Sep 27, 2006 #82 of 109
    ericd121

    ericd121 Crown Topper

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    Milton...
    Given the remote chance of the Series 3 being introduced into the UK, we may as well discuss school dinners!

    Also, seeing as newbies never read the sticky, one of them is bound to start a new "Is the Series 3 coming to the UK?" thread in a few month's time. :rolleyes:
    Pete, you seem to be either ignorant of state schools (understandably so) or you're projecting current problems with state schools onto the state of schools in my era, the 1970's; truancy was rare at my school.

    FYI I left in 1978 at 18.
    That makes me 46, now (with apologies to Carl; I thought you were more mature! ;) ).
    I didn't go to Uni, due to my own academic laziness - I can't use Thatcher as an excuse, even if she was Education Minister.
    Private schools were given charity status by, yes, Thatcher in the 1980's; many of us believe this was a means to avoid tax, not for any altruistic ethos espoused by these educational establishments.
    No, our mums were brought up in the 30's and 40's, and therefore had been taught how to cook. We ate the school dinners because they were good food and we were growing kids. Then we had more good food when we went home. Kids eat a lot! :p
    It's amazing to me that your private school didn't teach you the use of the apostrophe and it's exceptions... ;)
    Sir, you have no taste! ;) Actually, the dull, grey Technophobe themes were my spur to create the Lovely Themes.
     
  3. Sep 27, 2006 #83 of 109
    cwaring

    cwaring VM Tivo User

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    Knaresboroug...
    After my four years on here I don't know how you came to that conclusion :p:D
     
  4. Sep 27, 2006 #84 of 109
    Pete77

    Pete77 New Member

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    I'm judging from my Brother in Law who retrained as a teacher 5 years ago and who first taught at a massive boys only state school institution in downtown Medway that seemed to constitute little more than a pre-Borstal and where even physical assaults on teachers did not lead to expulsions as the Head wanted to lower his suspension and expulsion rates in government figures to get more funding.

    He now teaches at another Secondary School establishment (no Comps in Kent as they are all grammar and Secondary system) in a different Kent town which has a better Head but still high rates of truancy (especially after age 14) which he tells me they generally don't chase in the last year or two before these problem pupils leave because the kids concerned generally either disrupt the lessons or vandalise the premises if they are compelled to attend - he also says these particular kids are mainly incapable of being taught so high is their aggression level and their general disrespect and contempt for authority. I think you will find that since your day the cane has gone as has almost all respect for establishment figures amongst many working class kids and the one parent families who are so frequently responsible for their delinquency.

    It sounds like you should have gone into Politics Eric as you have plenty of opinions in that area as well as on Tivos ;)

    I think of Technophobe2 as beautifully clear with just a little colour that does not distract from its functionality. Actually your boxes round each item in the in any case fairly superfluos top line repeat menu was an improvement but was just that your colour schemes were all one very bright colour that I didn't care for so much. The Lovely Green was not bad but in my subjective opinion still not an advance on Technophobe2.
     
  5. Sep 28, 2006 #85 of 109
    ericd121

    ericd121 Crown Topper

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    Milton...

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    At last! Something we can agree on. :p

    Speaking with all the knowledge and experience of a non-parent, I am in favour of corporal punishment for children.

    I believe it teaches a non-verbal lesson that become hard-wired into the child
    "There's always someone bigger than you, so behave or you'll suffer."
    That, to me, is the function of the Police and is the basis of an ordered society.

    It's also why I opposed the NSPCC's campaign against smacking;
    children need to curb their aggression and reasoning doesn't work.

    Actually, I think the lack of respect is widespread in all strata of society;
    middle class kids are spoilt and therefore don't respect the effort that adults make to provide for them;
    working class kids are aggressive, too cool for school and fall into disruptive behaviour.

    Yes, generalisations, but with some truth, I think.
     
  6. Sep 28, 2006 #86 of 109
    Pete77

    Pete77 New Member

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    So another 40+ non parent like myself then and I suspect also Carl. Is it our solo status that perhaps gives us all this extra time to ensure that we view all the television programs we consider most important? Having said that I never can fully catch up with the number of extra hours of recorded program my machine can now hold compared to an original Tivo, especially with all those extra distractions that also kill hours of valuable telly time like the Internet and especially all those addictive internet discussion forums (which the media never talks about strangely suggesting that all people ever do is write self diary web logs).

    As to society the whole thing seems to slowly be crumbling away from the fine and straightforward values that you and I were used to in our childhood of the 1960s and 1970s but then again I suppose it could just be my age that is to blame for how I feel?.....
     
  7. Sep 29, 2006 #87 of 109
    katman

    katman New Member

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    I am 46. I got the cane a couple of times at school for really quite trivial things but I made sure it didnt happen anymore.

    When I was growing up we only had 3 TV channels and video recorders didnt exist (OK so the first ones appeared when I was about 15 but very few could afford one). This meant that children could only see programmes when they were actually on TV and anything with bad language or violent/sexual content wasnt shown until later in the evening.

    Now with Video and DVD, children can watch ANY film at any time. OK so we all saw things that we should have done like sneaking into an "X" film when we were only 15 but even the content of films has changed. I have seen some films classed as "12A" and content in there certainly wouldnt have been available to an audience of 12 year olds when I was that age. Kids of 5 & 6 regularly watch films intended for a much older audience at a time when they dont properly understand right from wrong etc and then believe what they are seeing is "normal"

    Rap "Music" if you can call it that these days has lyrics that contain explicit sexual references or extreme violence and aggression, so much so that most of the records have to be censored before playing on the radio but of course the CD is uncensored. This results in kids believing that using the "F" word every other word is normal.

    I dread to think what the state of the population will be like in 20 years time :(
     
  8. Sep 29, 2006 #88 of 109
    blindlemon

    blindlemon tivoheaven.co.uk

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    F***ing abysmal :eek: :D:D

    (But at least almost everybody should have a TiVo :))
     
  9. Sep 29, 2006 #89 of 109
    Pete77

    Pete77 New Member

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    I don't think the television program as we now understand it will actually exist in 30 years time. It will all be an interleaved multmedia experience while surfing on your PC or rather your handheld mobile device.

    Sadly a Tivo will only be useful for so long as there is a conventional television schedule and conventional television programs to record.

    Although perhaps they may still about be showing some old 1980s tv programs for us oldies in 30 years time as they wheel us around in our new high tech bath chairs!
     
  10. Sep 29, 2006 #90 of 109
    Gavin

    Gavin Member

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    12A does not mean no under 12's , thats the 12 certificate. 12A means no one under 12 *UNLESS* accomonaied by an adult. It's the adults responsibility to make sure it's suitable for that child. You could have a 1 year old but if the adult thinks it's OK they are allowed in.
     
  11. Sep 29, 2006 #91 of 109
    ndunlavey

    ndunlavey Just a user, really

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    Yup - just like TV itself meant that books, radio and ciema completely disappeared.
     
  12. Sep 29, 2006 #92 of 109
    Pete77

    Pete77 New Member

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    I haven't noticed any of those mediums having disappeared completely, although clearly TV has heavily dented their levels of popularity.
     
  13. Sep 29, 2006 #93 of 109
    Redux

    Redux No intent to annoy

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    Actually there's a building in my town called a liberry and once when I accidentally walked past the DVD racks I noticed a huge trash area with thousands of old books lined up on racks. I suspect the chemical content of the bindings makes landfill disposal illegal for environmental reasons so they keep them in this trash area til they rot away.

    So if, for curiosity, anyone wants to actually see one of those things called a book, PM me I'll show you on a map how to get there. We have an airport only about 20 miles away.
     
  14. Sep 29, 2006 #94 of 109
    ndunlavey

    ndunlavey Just a user, really

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    Clearly? What figures do you have? I suspect that both the total number of books read annually in the country and the number of books read annually per capita are both higher now that they were 100 years ago.
     
  15. Sep 29, 2006 #95 of 109
    Pete77

    Pete77 New Member

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    It appears you omitted the rolling eyes sarcasm symbol from your original post then? ;) :p

    An awful lot of books these days are bought as birthday presents etc still due to our huge shop retail industry and the cheap price of most paperback books but I think market research will tell you that huge numbers of those books now go completely unread. I think some figures on the trend for the level of use at public lending libraries over the last 10 years would also begin to make you realise that there is very major shift in long term book reading trends.
     
  16. Sep 29, 2006 #96 of 109
    ndunlavey

    ndunlavey Just a user, really

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    What are these figures, then?
     
  17. Sep 29, 2006 #97 of 109
    Pete77

    Pete77 New Member

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    Figures are that hardly anyone borrows ordinary reading books from public libraries anymore. They either buy them, because disposable incomes are much higher even at the less wealthy end of society, and also books are a lot cheaper in real terms, or they use web based alternatives to obtain the information (if it was a factual book rather than a childrens or a fiction book).

    Also when we have wifi access everywhere and portable tablets that use the universal wifi and that look like a book page then eventually the normal book is going to be severely under threat even though I'm sure many of them will be kept unread on bookcases in people's houses as antiques.

    Newspapers are already feeling the pinch. I know I hardly every buy one anymore.
     
  18. Sep 29, 2006 #98 of 109
    ndunlavey

    ndunlavey Just a user, really

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    I would have thought the drop in book borrowing figures was more to do with the relative reduction in prices of books than to do with a shift from reading books to watching TV. And it's going to be a L O N G time before electronic books make any sort of impact on book buying. Resolution, usability, reliability, weight and aesthetics have a very long way to go.

    I would be astonished if TV use was much reduced in my life time (I've got at least another 20-odd years to go). I was chatting a couple of weeks ago to guy who does various new media things for the Beeb, and was very surprised at his denigrating of producers that "still have the mindset of producing one or two hour programmes", because he sees the future as being mini-bites of stuff, consumed on demand and blended as the recipient feels fit. I'm aghast at the prospect - whither, for example, Foyle's War, Inspector Morse or I, Claudius in such a world?
     
  19. Sep 29, 2006 #99 of 109
    Pete77

    Pete77 New Member

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    Wither indeed is what will happen to such productions. In fact its already happened if you look at the BBC's drama and comedy output now compared to 20 years ago.

    I don't know there might be a huge public revolt against the whole thing at the point at which they want to install a direct computer wi-fi link inside our brains. You can obviously imagine what kind of scary types of uses such technology could be put to with someone like Tony Blair or worse still David Cameron at the helm.
     
  20. Nebulous

    Nebulous New Member

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    Interestingly, i did see an article about 6 months ago (on click I think) that showed a new type of flat panel display that used liquid ink cells and had a reasonably good 'printed' look.

    It could display an image indefinitely while consuming zero power. It only required power to actually change the image.

    This is perfect for electronic books, so it will be interesting to see if that takes off.

    I much prefer to retreat to a quiet location and read a real book than sit reading in front of a PC, but it is rather a waste of trees, especially of you only read it once.

    An electronic book with the look and feel of a real one does sound appealing. With the same memory capacity as an MP3 player, it would be able to store millions of pages of text.

    I wouldn't be at all surprised to see this type of thing appearing very soon.
     

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