Series 1 TIVO - To upgrade or not

Discussion in 'TiVo Help Center' started by sconi1, Jun 3, 2007.

  1. Jun 3, 2007 #1 of 13
    sconi1

    sconi1 New Member

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    May 30, 2007

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    I was originally given the Series 1 TIVO (Sony SVR 2000 Model) as a Christmas gift back in Dec of 2000. I also purchased the lifetime service option on it at the time for about $300. I've used it everyday since and it's been an excellent device. However, for sometime now, I've noticed that there is alot of freezing, choppy playback, almost a wow and flutter like audio where it sounds like a warpped tape cassette. In any case, I called TIVO to see if I could transfer my lifetime service to a new unit. They said that they stopped doing that about a year ago. They also don't offer any lifetime service agreements anymore. So my dilema is whether or not I should get the current unit fixed.

    As far as getting a new TIVO, I like that they do alot more but for what I use it for, I'm not sure if it is worth getting a new one. Being I already have a lifetime service agreement, I'd probably end up paying more $ over time with a new service agreement on a new unit.

    Has anyone here ever had a Series 1 TIVO repaired as far as replacing the hard drive? If so, what size would I need or what type/model, etc.... and what is the best way to go about getting someone to fix it. Do you find that by replacing the hard drive that the problems you had before are now solved or do you have new ones?

    Any help would be appreciated, thanks!
     
  2. Jun 3, 2007 #2 of 13
    murgatroyd

    murgatroyd Don't stop believin'

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    Berkeley CA
    Yes, it's tedious, but not difficult to put in a new hard drive. My SVR-2000, an open-box unit, showed signs of stuttering very early on. We put in a new drive and haven't seen any problems except when the drive gets VERY full.

    Since my husband swaps drives in and out all the time and knows Linux, we followed the Hinsdale instructions and did our own upgrade. The main problem we had is that our computer was too old and its BIOS would not recognize a TiVo-sized drive, so we had to set up a different computer to perform the backup and upgrade. If we had used that computer from the get-go, the process would have taken us about 2 hours.

    If you don't want to deal with getting your own new drive and copying your old one, there are drop-in replacements available from third-party vendors (however, by doing this you will lose your recordings and settings).

    In either case, check out the Upgrade forum for details on what options are currently available.

    I love my SVR-2000 -- as far as I am concerned, it is totally worth it to fix if it, especially if it is a Lifetimed unit.

    Good luck!

    Jan
     
  3. Jun 3, 2007 #3 of 13
    bidger

    bidger Active Member

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    I repaired a S1 by replacing the hard drive, which experienced a head crash. Set it in a tightly sealed wrapper in the freezer overnight, took it out in the AM and let it sit at room temperature for a couple of hours before I hooked it up and ran the restore to the new drive. I've also upgraded several TiVos.

    Question is, how comfortable are you opening a computer case, connecting and setting jumpers on hard drives, being able to read and execute instructions, and asking for help if necessary? Even if you're not, but you're willing to learn, you should pull through.

    If you want to avoid that experience, there are forum sponsors who can send you a replacement upgrade drive that you can pop in the TiVo. You have options. Head over to the Upgrade Forum and see what you can find.
     
  4. Jun 3, 2007 #4 of 13
    Gregor

    Gregor Wear Your Mask! TCF Club

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    If you're comfortable with PC hardware, the Series1 is no big deal. Just be careful, the power supply in it is unshielded and can give you a nasty shock if you're not careful.
     
  5. Jun 4, 2007 #5 of 13
    murgatroyd

    murgatroyd Don't stop believin'

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    Berkeley CA

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    And if you copy your drive yourself, don't boot into Windows with your TiVo drive attached to your computer.

    Jan
     
  6. Jun 4, 2007 #6 of 13
    JacksTiVo

    JacksTiVo TiVo User since 2001

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    Jan 7, 2006
    New Jersey
    Do a search of other threads in TCF. If I am not mistaken, a Series 1 w/lifetime and purchased prior to 2001 may have a one-time grandfathered transfer. The wording of the lifetime agreement back then was not explicit and could be interpreted to mean the life of the owner, not the unit.

    If that is the case for you, buy a new dual tuner unit and transfer the lifetime instead of upgrading. If you have broadband Internet service, the S2 features are superior to the S1.
     
  7. Jun 4, 2007 #7 of 13
    bidger

    bidger Active Member

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    The magic date is Jan. 20, 2000.
     
  8. Jun 4, 2007 #8 of 13
    sconi1

    sconi1 New Member

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    May 30, 2007
    Thanks for all the responses everyone! :) All of this information really helps!
     
  9. Jun 4, 2007 #9 of 13
    wolflord11

    wolflord11 Lord of Darkness

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    Madisonville...
    Look to get a Series 2 unit, you should be able to transfer the lifetime to it, just talk to the right CSR at Tivo.

    Upgrading the Series 1 will work, but the cost and time is not worth it, because later on done the Road you will ned to upgrade.

    Hope this helps :D
     
  10. classicsat

    classicsat Astute User

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    Ontario Canada.
    You can get a big HDD now to upgrade the Series 1. If that doesn't pan out, you can use it in the Series 2.

    Or you can upgrade to a Series 3, if that floats your boat.
     
  11. bidger

    bidger Active Member

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    Mar 30, 2001
    Elmira, NY
    Classicsat, you missed the part where the OP wants to keep the S1 because it has Lifetime Service.
     
  12. jdhowe77

    jdhowe77 New Member

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    Dec 14, 2006
    i had the same issue. same unit, but my harddrive was making a lot of noise. i recently upgraded with a new drive from dvrupgrade.com. works great, however i am currently having a problem with it not automatically retrieving the programming data every 2 weeks. i have to manually do it.

    on a similar note, anyone know how to upgrade a svr 2000 with a network card?
     
  13. JacksTiVo

    JacksTiVo TiVo User since 2001

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    Jan 7, 2006
    New Jersey
    I just did it with my Series 1. I purchased the Turbonet card from 9th Tee and found installation instructions at: http://www.dvrupgrade.com/dvr/stores/1/installation_instructions/standalone-turbonet.pdf

    It was very easy and absolutely trouble free. Just remember to plug into your network prior to changing the dial-in prefix. Also your router will assign an I.P. address to the TiVo so make sure it does not conflict with other devices that may have fixed I.P. addresses you previously may have assigned. It your router assigns all I.P. addresses automatically, then you will not have any problems.
     

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