Security lock for the Series3?

Discussion in 'TiVo Series3 HDTV DVRs' started by BOMOON, Sep 6, 2011.

  1. Sep 6, 2011 #1 of 10
    BOMOON

    BOMOON Negative Futurist

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    Dec 11, 2004
    Southern NH
    Hey Everyone,

    I was wondering if anyone has secured their Series3 with some kind of anti-theft cable lock? I couldn't find references in the docs to anything like a Kensington lock slot on the unit.

    A manual search didn't turn up a locking slot or tab either; however Kensington makes an adapter set for a PC with multiple peripherals. An adapter ring is attached to the back of the series 3 with "industrial strength adhesive", and the locking cable is passed through the ring.

    That gluing business sounds a little fishy to me. Reviewers in various product forums (like Amazon) say it works OK.

    Anyway, is anyone using some kind of securing lock for the Series3, and if so, what did you use and how did you attach it to the unit?

    Thanks for your time,
     
  2. Sep 6, 2011 #2 of 10
    lillevig

    lillevig Cold in East Iowa

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    Marion, Iowa
    Dude - I thought NH was a low crime area. Seriously. if you are willing to carefully drill a hole in the bottom chassis you can simply attach an eyebolt. After you thread the nut onto the bolt make sure that you damage the bolt threads or epoxy the nut in place to keep it from being removed. Then you can attach whatever chain or cable you want to the eyebolt.
     
  3. Sep 6, 2011 #3 of 10
    BOMOON

    BOMOON Negative Futurist

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    Dec 11, 2004
    Southern NH
    Not any more, unfortunately. Home burglaries are up. I live in the Nashua-Manchester area, where the population density is the highest in the state. There are even gangs starting to show up in the cities and larger towns. Two years ago there was a thrill killing in the next town over. It was a gang of teenagers from a different town. They must have picked one of the few homes around here that isn't armed to the teeth (this is a gun state).

    Sorry for the tangent. It's still pretty rural in a lot of places. It's just that home burglaries really are up.

    Anyway, I'm installing Kensington Locks on my flat panel TVs. In the process of doing that, I thought it might be a good idea to secure some of the components too. Some of them, like the TiVo, are big bucks items.

    Hence this thread. Your idea is a pretty good one for homegrown cable lock systems. I'd have to check the warranty and the lifetime TiVo subscriptions to make sure that drilling holes in the thing doesn't screw up any service agreements.

    That's probably why the Kensington adapter affixes to the outside of components. For various reasons people don't want to take their units apart to modify the cases in any way.

    Thanks for the input. I'll have a look at the service agreements to see if I can get away with it.

    Anyone else have ideas for the Series3 and cable locking systems?

    Thanks for your time,
     
  4. Sep 7, 2011 #4 of 10
    unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    Before you do any drilling on your TiVo remove the drive, the motherboard, and the power supply (and possibly the front panel) and then make sure all the metal shavings are cleaned out of it before reinstalling all the parts.
     
  5. Sep 7, 2011 #5 of 10
    Worf

    Worf Well-Known Member

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    They do make large sticky pads that terminate in a loop - it's meant for securing multiple devices to a single kensington lock - the sticky pad is a strong adhesive and sticks to the case, and you just thread the kensington lock through it, securing multiple things with one lock.

    Of course, it is a bit ugly, and if you don't put it on the back of the case, someone could always take the TiVo apart. Of course, putting it on the back of the case makes it really difficult to open later (the case tops slide back and lift off. Putting the pad there makes it hard to slide the top off.).
     
  6. Sep 7, 2011 #6 of 10
    lillevig

    lillevig Cold in East Iowa

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    Marion, Iowa
    Don't do it if you still have hardware warranty left. As for the lifetime service agreement, no issue there unless some metal filings zap the electronics. The service status is embedded in a chip on the motherboard.

    I understand that lots of folks don't want to open their Tivo cases but lots do if for no other reason than to upgrade the hard drive. But just like a gun, if you don't know what you're doing, don't do it.
     
  7. Sep 7, 2011 #7 of 10
    BOMOON

    BOMOON Negative Futurist

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    Dec 11, 2004
    Southern NH
    Thanks to unitron, Worf, and lilleveg for the great advice. Yes, that Kensington kit with the "sticky pad" and slot adapters is one of the locks I've been pricing. Looks like it comes with one pad and two lock slot adapters. I'd need one slot with multiple pads, just the opposite, unless I opt to do some work on the case.

    RE dealing with the metal filings, I have what I need here to do that kind of work. However, completely disassembling the unit is another reason why I'm loathe to mess around with the case.

    Some time ago I considered upgrading/changing the internal hard drive. For similar reasons, I opted for that expensive Western Digitial external drive instead.

    Re location: with this setup, placing the locking system behind the units is not problem. That's where all the wiring, UPS, and other junk is, out of sight. The locks and cables would be invisible back there.

    It's actually going to be a fun project. I've already sent for standalone cable locks for TVs and PCs in other rooms. I'll have to take it slow for budget reasons, but I *think* I have time.

    Anyone else have ideas on this topic? I'm open to suggestion!

    Thanks once again to unitron/Worf/lilleveg,
     
  8. Sep 7, 2011 #8 of 10
    unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    Instead of placing the lock thingie on the back, you might want to put it on the bottom near the front so that a would-be thief sees it before he grabs it and tries to pull it out of it's cubbyhole.
     
  9. Sep 8, 2011 #9 of 10
    Worf

    Worf Well-Known Member

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    I think a good office supply store should be able to sell you the sticky pads themselves, or even metal enclosure locks that basically clamp around a thing you want to protect (they make 'em for PCs, laptops, VCRs, etc).

    Heck, Amazon probably sells it. The only hard part is figuring out what they're called...
     
  10. MikeAndrews

    MikeAndrews Registered abuser

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    Jan 17, 2002
    Northern...
    I used the kit with the adhesive to tie down a microwave in our office. It does hold fast. The point is to stop the grab and go thief and it will.
     

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