Roku Signs TiVo License Pact Covering 6,000 Patents

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by krkaufman, Apr 12, 2017.

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  1. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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  2. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    One of their main ones is for the grid guide. Lots of companies sign with them just for that. Although I think that's ending soon.
     
  3. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    I was wondering if that was one reason PS Vue swapped the axes in their TV grid guide, as a way around Rovi's patents.

    I'm kinda hoping Roku implements something like OnePass for the Roku environment.
     
  4. BigJimOutlaw

    BigJimOutlaw Well-Known Member

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    Fingers crossed for a product cross-license someday.

    Embed Roku (I would pay more for an extra chip on the motherboard if necessary), let their searches communicate with each other, and then we'll actually have a shot at the "one box". I can dream. :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2017
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  5. rassi

    rassi Member

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    I'd love to be able to watch our main TiVo on the Roku sticks we have on other TVs.
     
  6. JoeKustra

    JoeKustra in the other Alabama TCF Club

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    I use my Roku 3 for streaming. But for content in DD 5.1 and/or 24fps, it's better on a TiVo.
     
  7. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    That would only require TiVo to write an app for Roku, no reason for Roku to license anything from TiVo. In fact there will most likely be such an app soon for the upcoming Mavrik.

    Embedding Roku in the TiVo would be interesting, but seems if that's what they were doing the deal would be the other way around. Plus, because TiVo is Linux based, it seems like it would make more sense for them to switch to Android.
     
  8. Series3Sub

    Series3Sub Well-Known Member

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    So TiVo threatened to SUE Roku, and Roku not being HUGE, decided to better sign on the dotted line rather than bleed money to lawyers and be distracted by a multi-year legal defense. Yup, TiVo (Rovi) leveraging is license portfolio, once again.
     
  9. SullyND

    SullyND W: 33-9 (Camping World Bowl) TCF Club

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    Wasn't Roku started by someone from ReplayTV?
     
  10. Mikeguy

    Mikeguy Well-Known Member

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    Well, and maybe TiVo/Rovi even had the legal right to protect its intellectual property . . . . ;)
     
  11. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    Gemstar, the company before Rovi, was widely considered to be a patent troll. They would buy patents from small companies just so they could then sue big companies that were breaching them. Rovi tried to get away from that but has still done a fair bit of litigation.
     
  12. Mikeguy

    Mikeguy Well-Known Member

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    I always have an issue with the term "patent troll." It's one thing if a patent owner, whomever it may be, doesn't have a leg to stand on and sues/threatens. But if one has valid and infringed intellectual property . . . . And sometimes, these patent holders are suing on patents that started with sole inventors, who themselves couldn't enforce their rights given their own circumstances and who they would be up against.
     
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  13. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    But there are companies who's sole business is to buy patents from small or failed businesses and then use those to sue other companies. That is their only source of revenue. It's a slimy practice even if it's technically legal.
     
  14. atmuscarella

    atmuscarella Well-Known Member

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    One might also say that the large companies that don't bother to pay those small or failed businesses for their intellectual property are pretty slimy also, after all if those small or failed businesses were properly paid perhaps they could have grown or not failed. It is like saying stealing from weak or dead people is ok and that no one should go after those thieves.

    In the end the biggest issue I have is what people/companies are allowed to patent. If what was patentable became a little more realistic then I would have no issues with people/companies enforcing any patents they owned.
     
  15. ncted

    ncted A leaf on the wind

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    Having worked at a company who was sued on a number of occasions for patent infringement, I can say that the patent trolls often sue over patents that never should have been granted in the first place. In all cases with which I was involved, the cases were thrown out because the patents involved were obvious and not novel ideas (usually with prior art), but that didn't stop the trolls from suing everyone they could to try to squeeze some money out of them. For a smaller company, using software elements that are as old as dirt that no one should have a patent on any more, paying the troll is often cheaper than going to court, even that is what they should do. My understanding is that things have gotten a little better since patent trolls who lose now have to pay the defense's legal costs, but there is still a large expense to the defendant for these cases which are not strictly legal in nature.

    IMHO, most software patents are crap these days anyway. New compression algorithm? sure. Using a four digit code in a URL for an online contest? not so much. There is a lot more of the latter than the former. (yes, we were actually sued over that)

    In any case, this feels like a win-win for both companies, and getting access to Tivo patents will probably help out Roku a lot.
     
  16. Mikeguy

    Mikeguy Well-Known Member

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    This is the one I always have issues with--I just don't know. As a practical matter, this can be the only way that the small or failed companies/inventors can earn a return on their patented inventions, not being in a financial position to enforce their patent rights themselves. That part of it can be good, it seems to me. But I understand why people get upset with these "suing mills"--it just can feel "unpatent-like" and wrong. And there's the abuse issue there as well, with the use of dubious patents--while this certainly happens apart from the mills, the mills can magnify that and other issues with the system. Perhaps much of this comes down to the law's allowing of patents to be sued on even when the suing party isn't using the invention--and it needn't just be a mill.
     
  17. bbrown9

    bbrown9 Active Member TCF Club

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    Wait, what? Where did you hear that the grid guide would be ending soon?
     
  18. SullyND

    SullyND W: 33-9 (Camping World Bowl) TCF Club

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    He means the patent will expire.
     
  19. aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    Then issue would be with the USPTO, not the companies.
     
  20. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    Yeah I meant the patent for the grid guide, not that the grid guide itself would be going away.
     

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