Roamio OTA 1TB

Discussion in 'TiVo Roamio DVRs' started by Photo_guy, Apr 27, 2016.

  1. Apr 29, 2016 #61 of 164
    olsen623

    olsen623 Amazing Larry

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    Apr 29, 2016
    Batavia,...

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    This seems like a good deal for ROTA/1TB . I missed the $299 ROTA/500GB offer but may pull the trigger on this one. Either 500GB or 1TB would be fine for us.

    We currently have an 8 year old stock HD 160GB unit that we've always used OTA-only and it has lifetime. It's been a real trooper and given us no problems. But it's basically 10 year old hardware -- I take it the ROTA is much snappier and uses less power. Aside from better streaming support, what are some other advantages moving up to ROTA from an old HD?
     
  2. Apr 29, 2016 #62 of 164
    atmuscarella

    atmuscarella Well-Known Member

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    I think you pretty much listed them.
    1. Newer HD UI - includes SkipMode & QuickMode
    2. More apps
    3. More storage
    4. More tuners (4 versus 2)
    5. I also like the remote better. I like RF (no line of sight needed).
    The Roamio OTA is a very good OTA DVR with acceptable streaming abilities.
     
  3. Apr 29, 2016 #63 of 164
    olsen623

    olsen623 Amazing Larry

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    Apr 29, 2016
    Batavia,...
    Looks like Lifetime HD/160GB units are going for about ~$150 on flea-bay. If I sell the HD and get the new ROTA/1TB deal that would bring it down to ~$250. Not a bad deal.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2016
  4. Apr 29, 2016 #64 of 164
    purwater

    purwater I make tasty water

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    Yeah this is the start of a trial run for the wife and I. Currently have Directv and plan on cancelling it in the next 10 days. Since we only get 3 decent OTA channels I've been letting it record the stuff we watch on those for the past 6 weeks or so. I figure if we have an internet outage we'll have a good amount of shows recorded to watch that evening. I'm hoping the transition to OTA and streaming goes well, and saves us some cash monthly. Worst case is that we come back to Directv on one of their "come back" offers or try Dish for a couple of years on the new customer offers.
     
  5. Apr 29, 2016 #65 of 164
    mjh

    mjh Re: Member

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    I've been exclusively OTA + OTT since July 2010. It would appear that the incredible response to the firesale on OTA units coupled with the crazy markups that those units were fetching on ebay, *FINALLY* got the message across to tivo: the customer base who wants an OTA tivo does not want a monthly subscription. They were completely marketing it wrong. It's good to see tivo re-introducing a product they thought was dead in response to customer demand.

    This is a weirdly satisfying piece of news that makes me happier than it should.
     
  6. Apr 29, 2016 #66 of 164
    JTHOJNICKI

    JTHOJNICKI Member

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    Does anyone know which Roamio model will serve as the basis for the new OTA? Roamio? Plus? or Pro?

    Anyone seen a picture of it yet?

    I'm really tempted as I have the Bolt, but have yet to purchase the All-In. I use the Bolt only for OTA and even with a 3TB drive upgrade, I find myself running low on drive space too fast. I also have a 3TB Roamio Pro with a cablecard. I'm thinking about getting the new Roamio OTA All In and slapping in a 5TB drive. Cheaper than buying All-In with my Bolt. TBH the only reason I bought the Bolt at the time was for Skipmode and the fact that I got it on sale for $211. Now that the Roamio line has Skipmode; I'd be good with a 5TB Roamio OTA with All-In.
     
  7. Apr 29, 2016 #67 of 164
    rainwater

    rainwater Active Member

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    It is the same Roamio they sold before (based of the standard Roamio). The only difference is it has a 1TB hard drive and the included lifetime service.
     
  8. Apr 29, 2016 #68 of 164
    timbuckone

    timbuckone New Member

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    Now I hope tivo adds sling tv to the ota. Channel master dvr+ has it.
     
  9. Apr 29, 2016 #69 of 164
    warrenn

    warrenn Well-Known Member

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    What would it take to add Roku support to the Tivo? Many smart TV's come with Roku support and, in my simple opinion, it seems like it would add a lot of value to Tivo. Regardless of how good the support apps are in Tivo, if the user has to wait for Tivo to add support for it, then it's not very useful. The user will likely end up using a standalone streaming device instead to get access to whatever channels they want.
     
  10. Apr 29, 2016 #70 of 164
    LoveGardenia

    LoveGardenia Member

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    I was wondering if there was a newer model motherboard. But based on your reply this may not be the case.
     
  11. Apr 30, 2016 #71 of 164
    NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    You're 100% correct in thinking that TiVo needs to hitch its streaming wagon to a more popular platform. That's especially true if they come out with a non-DVR streaming box this fall, which is one interpretation of remarks TiVo honchos made on their most recent quarterly earnings call.

    Would Roku be willing to license their platform to TiVo? I dunno. It's true that, aside from their thriving streaming box/stick business, Roku sees a big part of their future in licensing their platform to smart TV makers, which they've been doing for a couple years now. But those Roku-powered smart TVs have a UI that looks very much like what you get with a standalone Roku box. In TiVo's case, they would presumably be looking to keep their existing TiVo system UI and just be able to run apps (or "channels" as Roku calls them) coded for Roku, with access to the Roku channel store, I guess. TiVo users could browse through Roku apps/channels, install them on their TiVo, and the most popular ones would be supported by TiVo's OnePass system.

    Would Roku license their platform to a competing set-top box maker to be used in a way that muddies or hides their brand that way? I sort of doubt it, but maybe if TiVo offered enough money to license the Roku platform in the way they'd want to use it. That said, I think Roku may be more amenable to partnering with TiVo by having TiVo DVR functionality reside within an app/channel made for Roku, with TiVo selling a hardware accessory that includes the tuners and hard drive. The accessory would connect to the Roku either via USB, wifi or ethernet. So essentially TiVo would be a direct competitor to the likes of Tablo in this case.

    I think it makes more sense for TiVo to turn to Android as their streaming platform. Google licenses full-blown Android, with access to the Google Play app store, to lots of hardware partners and allows them to modify the UI to an extent. Or TiVo could simply take open-source Android (which doesn't require paying a license to Google but also doesn't come with access to Google Play) and then integrate it with their products as they see fit, which is essentially what Amazon did with their Fire TV products. If done right, all the existing apps coded for Android TV (and there are a ton of them) should work fine. TiVo would just need to either pre-install them or upload them to their servers and set up their own little app store.
     
  12. Apr 30, 2016 #72 of 164
    JTHOJNICKI

    JTHOJNICKI Member

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    I just ditched Dish for Comcast & TiVo. Don't miss Dish at all and am saving a ton of money each month.
     
  13. Apr 30, 2016 #73 of 164
    tampa8

    tampa8 Official Tivo User

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    My Brother in Law finally switched from Comcast to DISH, loves it, likes the receiver(s) far better than what he had and is saving alot of money. He also has a couple channels he wanted that Comcast does not have. He really likes the external hard drive that can go to any receiver in the house.
     
  14. May 1, 2016 #74 of 164
    shwru980r

    shwru980r Well-Known Member

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    Tivo knows an OTA Tivo will be bricked in a few years, because of the ATSC 3.0 conversion. Then they can sell a new OTA Tivo for $700.
     
  15. May 1, 2016 #75 of 164
    aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    How will it be bricked? OTA 3.0 will not be required for any device or Broadcaster. And won't they still need to be broadcasting a legacy signal too?
     
  16. May 1, 2016 #76 of 164
    NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    It wouldn't be "bricked" unless ATSC 1.0 broadcasts completely ceased to exist and that won't happen for many, many years. The proposed plan is for the existing OTA bandwidth to be shared between ATSC 1.0 broadcasting from some towers in a given market and ATSC 3.0 broadcasting from others in that same market. For instance, instead of 10 different towers in a market now each broadcasting a single HD station and multiple SD subchannels in ATSC 1.0, you may have 6 towers broadcasting in ATSC 3.0 with a single UHD station plus a few subchannels on each, while the other 4 towers continue to broadcast in ATSC 1.0, with the channels that used to be spread across 10 towers now crammed onto those 4.

    That said, if the above takes place, that means that there will likely be fewer ATSC 1.0 channels being broadcast (say good-bye to some of those SD subchannels) and we'll see the major network affiliates' ATSC 1.0 broadcasts switch to lower bitrates and therefore lower picture quality -- either very compressed "HD lite" or maybe even all SD.

    So I don't see my Roamio OTA becoming completely obsolete until well after 2020, although it's possible that the quality and quantity of the OTA channels that it's able to receive will decrease to the point that I'm just not interested in using it.

    Now, all the above is conjecture, but I think it's pretty much reflective of what's being stated by most folks in the know.
     
  17. May 1, 2016 #77 of 164
    series5orpremier

    series5orpremier Well-Known Member

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    Right. Broadcasters won't voluntary turn off signals to potential eyeballs watching their commercials, and too many voters use OTA. There's enough bandwidth in smaller markets to handle all of it, and if people complain about picture quality on major channels they'll re-allocate resources to make it better. Turning off legacy signals will take an act of Congress, five years warning to consumers, and a government-subsidized conversion program.
     
  18. May 1, 2016 #78 of 164
    shwru980r

    shwru980r Well-Known Member

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    They are auctioning off the frequencies that TV stations are currently using, and the auctions start at the end of the month. Some stations will go out of business and others will have to move to a different frequency. The FCC already has congressional authority and money to pay the local broadcaster's costs to move the stations.
     
  19. May 1, 2016 #79 of 164
    foghorn2

    foghorn2 Well-Known Member

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    Bones: "Captain! What does God need with a broadcast signal?"

    Hope all these reLIEgous channels go away.
     
  20. May 1, 2016 #80 of 164
    shwru980r

    shwru980r Well-Known Member

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    From what I've read, it's not likely that a station that has to change frequency would be required to continue to broadcast a legacy signal. The FCC has to get money from Congress to pay the local broadcaster to change frequency and I doubt they will get a second frequency for a legacy signal. I would think a second legacy signal would cost twice as much. I doubt the FCC would pay for new equipment to broadcast the legacy signal on the new frequency either since they would turn right around and pay for new equipment to broadcast the new ATSC 3.0 signal.

    If there was a station that wasn't forced to move, then they could broadcast the legacy signal, but eventually they would switch to ATSC 3.0, because they are getting paid to do so by the FCC.
     

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