Pytivo on a QNAP?

Discussion in 'TiVo Home Media Features & TiVoToGo' started by wkearney99, Aug 2, 2015.

  1. wkearney99

    wkearney99 Bill Kearney

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    Dec 5, 2003
    Bethesda,...
    I'm debating getting a QNAP NAS. Anyone running pytivo on one? I'm looking at one of their Intel-based models, possibly the TS-453 or the TS-471. 4 bays of 4TB in a RAID6.

    I realize since pytivo only really needs python it's not much of a challenge for most linux-based machines to run it. But the devil being how well any given hardware handles transcoding (ffmpeg, etc). Any warnings or minefields to be concerned about?

    Right now it's been running on an i3 NUC 34010WYK, so it's not like it was screaming fast anyway, but it works. I'm looking to move toward a more appliance-like implementation, especially wrt drive failures and backups. A lone 5tb drive crapping out does not make for fun restore times from cloud backups...
     
  2. leswar

    leswar leswar

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    Apr 14, 2005
    Vero Beach
    If you haven't seen these resources on the plex website yet, they can provide good insight into what you can or cannot do with various NAS devices. The list is well laid out and informative. I would suggest reading all the article links too for a better uderstanding.
    Granted Plex is probably a more demanding power usurper than pytivo or streambaby but
    but the info gets you into the ballpark.

    I want to do the same. But the more I read the less I know.

    I'm thinkin' now NAS devices are storage units yet we want them to do more; become servers, well media servers that just don't serve but comput' as well.
    If I could figure out how to bypass transcoding-- most of my downloads are 720p mkvs.
    I use subtitles. So pytivo is good quality pic but no subs. streambaby is great pic and subs but graphically challenged. Plex is downgraded pic quality when using subs or when it transcodes-- which seems all the time. At this point I can't see me using Handbrake to change everything into some type of acceptable mp4 container. Whaat's thaat!!

    So now I'm thinkin' I gotta go the other way and build a HTPC with many drives some type of internal raid. Headache.
    The Hunt For the Ultimate Free Open Source NAS Distro
     
  3. wkearney99

    wkearney99 Bill Kearney

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    Dec 5, 2003
    Bethesda,...
    I hear ya on that!

    I've whipsawed back-and-forth over the years on how to run these sorts of things. Of late I'm sick of babysitting my collection of Frankenstein monsters. I'd like a little more set-and-forget functionality. Nothing's ever going to be completely hands-off, of course. But there's definitely somewhere between overly restrictive, single-purpose boxes and full knobs-on linux distros.

    The state of modern NAS boxes is pretty amazing, they are indeed bordering on being more like 'servers'. They've always been fileservers, obviously, and have had a variety of additional features so let's not quibble over semantics. Some of the new QNAP gear comes with the ability to run a hypervisor for virtual machines. Which holds interesting potential for running 'everything else' that won't run within the NAS host itself.

    I'm vacillating between the TVS-471 and the TS-453 Pro, from Qnap. The 453 comes across like it'll do what I need today, with no trouble. But definitely lacks the 471's ability to expand the RAM (16GB vs 8) or upgrade the processor.

    The real question is whether spending $1k for the NAS box (a TVS-471) and then more for drives, is an argument worth making, for here at the house. I'm leaning toward the more expensive/powerful model for the sake of getting the ability to run enough things without compromise. Or, in reality, not having my wife hear me complain about it. It's one thing to weather the initial "how much?" argument, it's another to fend off later "why was that not enough?" comments.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2015
  4. wkearney99

    wkearney99 Bill Kearney

    1,962
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    Dec 5, 2003
    Bethesda,...
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2015

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