OTA not working out - best option for local channels?

Discussion in 'TiVo Premiere DVRs' started by RDK, Nov 24, 2011.

  1. Series3Sub

    Series3Sub Well-Known Member

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    Mar 14, 2010

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    So, all the Seattle digital locals are UHF, non at VHF High-band. Well, if you feel you've done your best, then go with what you think will work. I just didn't want you to have to pay a dime extra for cable.

    I can tell you that it is very difficult to find anyone who is either willing or capable (not that difficult a task) to install an OTA well. That means we don't have many people who do this often who know all the tricks and how to deal with common problems.

    Best of luck to you.
     
  2. Series3Sub

    Series3Sub Well-Known Member

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    If the transmitters are in different locations as opposed to using a motor to turn a single antenna. I wasn't certain it could be done with good results, but I came across a tech sheet explaining it and some people on a different forum have done this with good results. I'm sure someone on this forum smarter than I can explain it in more detail.
     
  3. unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    That's true of analog cable local channels, likely, since they have to all be shoehorned into channels 2-13.

    Digital? YMMV.
     
  4. L David Matheny

    L David Matheny Active Member

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    Instead of combining the output of two antennas using an ordinary splitter/combiner, you can avoid interference by using a frequency-selective combiner to take only certain frequencies from each antenna. A VHF/UHF band combiner combines signals from a VHF antenna and a UHF antenna, and a Channel Master "Join-Tenna" (or equivalent) combines a single channel from one antenna with all others from a second antenna.
     
  5. aaroncgi

    aaroncgi New Member

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    Apr 13, 2010

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    Almost all the Seattle digital locals are UHF, but not all. Channels 9 (PBS), 11 (CW), and 13 (FOX) are still VHF. Those are the real channel numbers. FOX is rebroadcast in 16:9 480P on real channel 25 (22-2 virtual), which is nice, because it's transmitter isn't in Seattle. So while there aren't any VHF low stations, it's still useful to have VHF high reception.
     
  6. aaroncgi

    aaroncgi New Member

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    Apr 13, 2010
    In addition to what David mentions, if you're combining a UHF antenna with a VHF antenna and have need for a preamp, you can use a preamp designed for this specific purpose. For example, the Winegard AP-2870:

    http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.as...ries-Pre-Amplifier-(AP-2870)&sku=615798100100

    Or, the ChannelMaster CM7777:

    http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.asp?mc=03&p=ANC7777


    If our CM4228 antenna wasn't so decent on high VHF, I'd probably be using one of these myself.
     
  7. L David Matheny

    L David Matheny Active Member

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    Good points. I actually use a CM7777 preamp, and I still forgot about that option of connecting two antennas (one UHF and one VHF) to it.
     
  8. RDK

    RDK Member

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    Oct 8, 2011
    There are about 50 clear channels (approximately 10 of which are HD) carried on the same cable that provides my internet (even with internet only service). That includes 4-2, 7-2, 13-2, etc.. All the TV's in my house can see them clearly, as can the Tivo. However, the Tivo guide doesn't map the channels correctly without a cablecard, which requires cable service. But as mentioned previously, my cost for internet+basic cable is essentially the same as internet only (less than $5 different).

    The monthly Tivo service fee for cable is $20 (vice $10 for OTA), but I'm lifetime, so that's a moot point.

    I haven't done a channel-by-channel comparison, but I appear to have all the OTA channels (that I could receive) on cable, plus several that I couldn't receive (like CW, PBS, CBUT, Joe, etc.).

    My OTA setup does work (I get about 25 channels), but the reception on some channels is marginal, and drops to less than marginal when it rains hard (there is a hill between me and the transmitter, and everything is covered by thick trees in this region).

    If basic cable didn't include HD, or if subscribing to it caused me a significant net cost increase, I'd probably keep working the OTA angle. But since it does, and doesn't, cable seems like the best option for me. But my circumstances probably differ significantly from others.
     
  9. RDK

    RDK Member

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    Oct 8, 2011
    Perhaps that explains why I couldn't get 9 and 11. I do get 13, but that might be because the transmitter is in my backyard (I'm in Bremerton).
     

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