Orby TV

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by cannonz, Mar 5, 2019.

  1. Mar 5, 2019 #1 of 84
    cannonz

    cannonz Well-Known Member

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    Looked around saw no threads on this, looks like good deal for $40 a month. Any hidden fees etc.? Quality Satellite Television
     
  2. Mar 5, 2019 #2 of 84
    osu1991

    osu1991 Well-Known Member

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    If you go over to satelliteguys, there are many that have had it installed and reviewed the equipment.

    Orby TV - Support Forum
     
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  3. Mar 5, 2019 #3 of 84
    MikeBear

    MikeBear Letting my mind wander, luring it back with candy.

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    This is mainly targeted at people that want some "cable channels", but either don't have access to high-speed internet for conventional streaming, OR have low internet data caps. Since this is satellite based, it doesn't use your internet connection at all. It's kind of like a month to month no contract cut-rate version of Dish Network.

    Of course, you need to purchase either their basic receiver, OR their dvr receiver (which costs more). Then there is a one-time $150~ cost for the installation, which INCLUDES an OTA tv antenna (for your local channels), the satellite dish and lnb, and all wiring, etc. A tech comes to your house and installs it for you.

    The receiver will integrate any receivable OTA antenna channels into their on screen guide. You only need one dish, even if you buy and have more than one Orby sat receiver. Additional receivers can be run using a simple splitter.
     
  4. Mar 5, 2019 #4 of 84
    Phil T

    Phil T Well-Known Member

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    Did the satellite thing for 20 years. Back to cable and TiVo now. My old bones got tired of brushing the snow off the dish every time it snowed here in Colorado.
     
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  5. Mar 5, 2019 #5 of 84
    Series3Sub

    Series3Sub Well-Known Member

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    According to their website, this service is designed to be cheap and highly affordable. they go on about how they keep their own costs very low so they can pass along relatively low cost to the consumer. this service is never going to be a DirecTV or Dish like service offering hundreds of channels in high-quality with sophisticated whole home DVR systems. also cited on the site, is the lack of any sports channels whatsoever because of the high cost of obtaining rights to those channels and then turning around to the consumer with a higher price then what they can offer today. early reports of the service is that many channels may not be in high definition, If That Matters to some people. Further, Orbi contracts with a third-party to do the installation.

    I highly doubt they will even lease any more transponder space than they have today because that would mean more channels bring higher cost and higher costs for leasing more transponders. of course, they're never going to be leaving their current satellite they use for their service today because doing so is going to cost a whole lot of money and having to send someone out to repoint all customers to the new satellite is also very costly and subscribers would have to share that cost, and if they raise rates too high, then the whole point of their existence means that subscribers will just defect.

    This is not this is not to say that it is a bad service, indeed, this service may be what some people are looking for. You just have to be aware of what you're going to get for the relatively low price.

    IMHO, this service is not going to be successful mostly because of its high upfront cost and its requirement of special equipment that you get stuck with should you cancel the service.

    I'm thinking of the consumers who would most likely consider the OrbiTV service. they are or will be using their roku's and fire TVs etc. to access Netflix and Hulu with their very low monthly fees, and whoever else, for the bulk of their watching TV needs, and in addition, possibly subscribe to one of the virtual MVPD's, such as sling TV or DirecTV now, etc., with their relatively low monthly packages fee and their Cloud DVR service. But you have to consider this:
    the consumer can cancel their subscription to any of those above services at any time, and they can use the very same equipment, the reasonably priced Roku and Fire TVs, etc., to just simply switch to a competitor for the TV services, and later they're free to cancel and switch to, yet, another competitor Etc., and so on and so on.

    On the other hand, with Orbi TV you are making a fairly Hefty Financial investment by paying The Upfront cost of equipment (likely including additional rooms) and installation, and should you decide after some time that OrbiTV isn't for you, for some reason, well, Orbi TV equipment receives OrbiTV: it is not the flexible Roku, Fire TV etc. with its a sufficiently low cost that you can put one of those devices every room you have a TV and get a lot more access to a lot more content and competing services, in some cases, even a higher picture quality. And while the Amazon Fire recast TV (with no additional service fees) requires a fair investment for a 2 or 4 tuner model, it has the advantage of leveraging your current Fire TV devices in your home or the apps on your mobile devices, which saves you additional cost to view the OTA content/recordings, and even if you don't have any fire TVs in your home, you can still buy the relatively low priced fire stick TVs to put in just about every room you have a television.

    I don't know who these investors are in OrbiTV, but I think they're going to take a big bath. It is my humble opinion that this service is doomed.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2019
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  6. Mar 5, 2019 #6 of 84
    NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    I think it's pretty clear that OrbiTV is aimed at rural folks without access to wired broadband, whose only other TV options are DirecTV and DISH, but who don't need sports channels and want to save money on their TV bill. And over the next several years, that rural demographic will become pretty much the only Americans who subscribe to satellite TV from any of those three providers. And I suspect that as the customer base dwindles and the economics change, we may also see DTV and DISH imposing those same sorts of upfront costs for equipment and installation onto the customer too. Satellite (DBS) TV is in an irreversible decline and will probably completely disappear in the late 2020s.
     
  7. Mar 6, 2019 #7 of 84
    mattyro7878

    mattyro7878 Well-Known Member

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    I see an awful lot of dbs dishes. A lot of apartment complexes and many many two and three family homes in Connecticut. Dish for people who want cheap tv and DirecTV for guys like me who will pay for the best tech possible. I no longer fit that category but I wish I could. Then again ..no tivo so that would stink.
     
  8. Mar 6, 2019 #8 of 84
    smark

    smark Well-Known Member

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    Decline? Sure. Disappear? I have doubts about 5G getting to any of these people to make it something that will disappear.
     
  9. Mar 6, 2019 #9 of 84
    skypros

    skypros Ex satellite dealer

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    Hummmm..... Programming looks EXPENSIVE to me!! $40 / $50 mo is not going to fly it needs to be 1/2 the cost.
    It is a great concept, and I would love to get onboard with the company.... But too expensive, and does not have CNBC :mad: (yet)
     
  10. unclehonkey

    unclehonkey Well-Known Member

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  11. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    Doesn't have to be 5G, could be any form of broadband. (BTW, T-Mobile says that if they're allowed to merge with Sprint, the combined company will reach 96% of rural Americans with 5G by 2024.) It could be low earth orbit satellite broadband; OneWeb just last week launched their first few sats with plans to have service available globally in 2021. SpaceX's Starlink also plans to launch in the early 2020s. Then there's AT&T's AirGig, a sort of "wireless fiber" that runs along power lines, which they believe could be key to cheaply expanding their network into rural areas. None of those are sure bets, of course, but it's hard for me to believe that we won't see Americans without access to broadband dwindle to a very small percentage as we go through the 2020s.

    I'm told that DirecTV's current fleet of satellites should be physically operational until 2030 or a bit later (with DISH's current fleet exhausted at some point before then). We won't see any further DBS satellite launches (beyond one slated for this spring by DirecTV, which they've publicly stated will be there last one ever) because it wouldn't make sense economically. So it's possible that DirecTV (or whatever company/brand is running that service in the future) continues offering a deprecated TV service until the last satellite fails but it's also possible that, by the late 2020s as I said, the subscriber base has dwindled enough that the operation can no longer be profitably run.

    Anyhoo, whose satellites is Orby using to beam down TV? I'm guessing this is a small operation and they're just using spare capacity on DTV or DISH's birds, kinda like in the cellular world MVNOs like Simple Mobile and Google Fi just operate on the towers/networks of the big 4 (Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile, Sprint).
     
  12. osu1991

    osu1991 Well-Known Member

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    2 transponders on 117 W Ku. They are using 8psk hevc for all their channels, so they have plenty of bandwidth. reports are the picture quality is really good.

    Eutelsat 117 West A/B at 117.0°W - LyngSat
     
  13. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    Ah, cool. So they're riding on a sat that mostly carries Mexican TV networks, it looks like. Makes a lot of sense to use HEVC since they're starting fresh with new STBs. No point in using outdated less efficient H.264.

    Given that the sat they're on mainly seems to target Mexico, does its footprint extend across all of the lower 48 states too? Or is Orby only able to offer service to part of the US?

    To keep service cost down, it looks like they basically just aren't doing business with any of the companies that own the major broadcast networks, so no Disney (ABC, ESPN, etc.), no NBCUniversal (NBC, NBCSN, USA, etc.), no CBS (CBS, Showtime), and no Fox (Fox, FS1, Fox News, etc.). Essentially what they offer is Philo + Turner networks. A bit odd that they don't offer HBO as an add-on given that they're carrying AT&T's cable channels from Turner.

    The idea is that they install an OTA antenna for customers to get the big 4 networks for free, integrated into the Orby STB. But I wonder how many folks CAN get good OTA reception but DON'T have home broadband (and therefore access to lots of streaming cable packages in the $40-50 price range, same as Orby)? Seems like a pretty small niche.
     
  14. unclehonkey

    unclehonkey Well-Known Member

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    there are different spotbeams and the Ku1 spotbeam covers all the US
    https://www.eutelsatamericas.com/en/satellites/americas/EUTELSAT-117WA-downlink-coverage.html

    rumour is they are talking to FOX. Also this program started over a month ago so give them time. They also mentioned that they dont carry sports networks which keeps down prices.

    There are areas in cities that have crap for "broadband". My old house in the SW suburbs of Minneapolis could only get 1.5MB DSL....and last I checked (which was a month or so ago) that address can STILL only get 1.5MB...just checked and yup "Speeds up to 1.5 Mbps are available in your area!"
    woooo hooo. $45 for 1.5MB DSL :rolleyes:
    If you get the DVR model that integrates both OTA & satellite in one and can record both. Dont know if you can record OTA & sate at same time like you can on say a Dish 211k
     
  15. mattyro7878

    mattyro7878 Well-Known Member

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    No sports is a tough pill to swallow. March Madness, baseball gearing up. Have to break out the am radio!!
     
  16. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    Cable broadband from Comcast, Mediacom, etc. isn't available at your old house in suburban Minnesota? That seems really strange. If the *only* choice in a metro neighborhood for wired internet service is slow DSL, it should be a no-brainer for the local cable company to extend their network there. I've personally never known anyone from a suburban neighborhood anywhere who doesn't have wired broadband and TV service available at their home.
     
  17. Michael Miranda

    Michael Miranda New Member

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    Keep in mind they aren't carrying local stations just the cable channels. I found that I wasn't watching many of the cable channels and instead exploring things like "Me-TV", "Antenna TV ", "Decades", "Movies!" etc. That's where the TiVo OTA comes in handy, I stack up a bunch of shows to watch so they're ready when I am! I also have Netflix, Amazon Prime and Plex so much more than I can watch. Orby could end up being bought by the two other satellite services. I'm sure they're watching with interest!
     
  18. cannonz

    cannonz Well-Known Member

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    Like posters on that forum osu1991 linked I would like to see Fox added. Only one RF input on the receiver so obviously combine antenna just one lead per outlet needed another plus.
     
  19. dlfl

    dlfl Cranky old novice

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    If one has the internet bandwidth to support Netflix and Amazon Prime videos, and a device such as Roku or Fire TV to watch them, then it's hard to see the case for Orby. For the same or lower price you can subscribe to a service such as PlayStation Vue and get more channels and cloud DVR without paying for satellite TV hardware or mounting a dish. What happens if the Orby equipment (which you OWN) fails? Can it be repaired or replaced and for what cost? If PS Vue doesn't give you the local coverage you want, and you are in the Amazon ecosystem (Fire TV, etc.) you can use a Fire TV Recast and your PS Vue and local stations will be integrated in one (free) program guide and you have DVR for locals (as well as the PS Vue channels).

    The set of circumstances for which Orby is the best solution seem to be a very small niche.
     
  20. unclehonkey

    unclehonkey Well-Known Member

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    correct. There is a diplexer that is added to combine satellite and OTA into one connection
     
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