Oiling fan on premiere xl4 elite

Discussion in 'TiVo Premiere DVRs' started by WillyBilly, Nov 21, 2015.

  1. WillyBilly

    WillyBilly New Member

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    Feb 7, 2012
    New England

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    Hello Tivo friends! I am installing a new Hard Drive I purchased from Weaknees on my Premiere XL4 Elite. Since it has been used heavily for more than 3 years, it was recommended that I lubricate the fan while I've got it apart. Do I need to take the fan out in order to oil it? I heard somewhere in one of the posts that the capped oil tube is on the other side and they had to unscrew it and take it out in order to access the oil tube, but I don't know if they were talking about the Premiere Elite. Anyone know? If so, what wrench will I need. I heard about the combo light oil and heavier lube mixture. Any input will be appreciated. Thanks.
     
  2. unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

    16,594
    62
    Apr 28, 2006
    semi-coastal NC
    I don't think I've ever even been in the physical presence of a TiVo newer than the 648/652/658 Series 3 models, but going by the pictures I've been able to find, it looks like the same deal as the predecessors to the Premiere line.

    The fan is held in place with 4 screws that enter from the outside back panel and I'd be greatly surprised if you can't take them out with a #10 Torx bit, which I assume is what you need to open the unit up with as well.

    The side of the fan that faces the inside of the TiVo is the one that pulls in the air and that's the side that the hub with the blades attached is on.

    That hub has an axle that sticks through the bearing mounted in the center of the other side, the side facing the back of the TiVo, where it blows the air out.

    You take the 4 screws out, you pull the fan's plug off of the header pins on the TiVo motherboard, and maybe free the cord from a plastic cable clip and place the fan on a flat work surface, blade side down.

    There should be a round sticker on the bearing side.*

    Before you proceed to the re-lubing instructions, pick it back up and use a small paintbrush to clean off all of the dust that you can from the blades and the fan body.

    Then place it back on the table as before.

    Use an X-acto knife or utility knife or similar to lift the sticker part-way back until you can access the hole the bearing is in or the rubber plug in that hole.

    Remove the plug if there is one. That knife will come in handy for prying that out as well, or maybe a very small flat blade screwdriver, like for eyeglasses.

    If there's any lube visible in that hole and it looks very dirty, wipe it out with a Q-tip. You don't have to get every last molecule, just as much as you can.

    Currently I'm using South Bend Reel Grease and Super Reel Oil from the fishing tackle department at K-Mart.

    (Previously I've used Singer Sewing Machine oil or 3-in-One oil and Permatex Dielectric Tune-Up Grease from the auto parts store, and way back when car engine distributors had points and rubbing blocks, a molybdenum based grease called Ignition Lube. Basically you want a not terribly thick grease for body and a light oil to make the grease more slippery.)

    Drop a drop or 2 of the oil into the hole, then spin the blade assembly and work the axle up and down in the bearing.

    Squeeze a little grease into the hole and push it down with thumb or finger while turning the blade assembly and working the axle up and down in the bearing.

    If you've got room, add more grease and top off with more oil, still working the blades to spread it around. Remember to leave room for the plug to be re-installed.

    Put the plug back in if there is one, wipe the "under the sticker" area clean with a paper towel, then stick the sticker back down, using little dots of adhesive if necessary.

    Fan should now be good for several more years.

    This same technique can be used on PC power supply fans, case fans, CPU cooling fans, et cetera.

    *I don't think it does, but if the sticker, any sticker, on the fan says anything about Mag-Lev, then it uses a magnetic levitation bearing and not a sleeve or ball bearing, and is sealed and can't (and shouldn't) be lubricated.



    If you'd rather just throw money at the problem

    http://www.amazon.com/TiVo-Premiere-Replacement-Internal-Fan/dp/B008847B48

    and mail me the old fan.
     
  3. WillyBilly

    WillyBilly New Member

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    Feb 7, 2012
    New England
    Thank you so much Unitron for your very comprehensive solution. May the Tivo Angels protect you always. Willy
     
  4. Shagger

    Shagger Member

    76
    1
    Nov 2, 2007
    Won't any 60mm case fan do?
     
  5. MeInDallas

    MeInDallas Member

    924
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    Jul 31, 2011
    Dallas, Texas

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    No because its a 50mm fan.
     
  6. Shagger

    Shagger Member

    76
    1
    Nov 2, 2007
    Soooooo, won't any 50mm case fan do? :confused:
     
  7. MeInDallas

    MeInDallas Member

    924
    4
    Jul 31, 2011
    Dallas, Texas
    Sorry for being a smartass, but I couldnt resist ;)

    I honestly dont know why any 50mm wouldnt work. I'd much rather buy a new one than try to resurrect an old one, and risk it going out again while I was gone or whatever the case. I think a lot of Tivo owners want the same size and CFM that the original has 50x50x25, and thats almost impossible to find, unless you give in and buy one of the $20 ones from Weaknees, or off Ebay.

    I've only been able to find one that same size and it was on Amazon, but I'm not sure about the CFM. It is $10 shipped and made by IPCQueen.
     

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