Oh Crap - Rovi buys TiVo?

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by JoeKustra, Mar 24, 2016.

  1. wizwor

    wizwor Guest

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    Just google: percent of tivo revenue from patent suits

    TiVo's first profitable year included $105m in patent settlement revenues. Why do you think TiVo sued these people? What impact do you think the suits had on their desire to compete? The 'license' accommodation is no different than the franchise agreements awarded the cable companies. In fact, franchise is defined as...

    The only difference is that the cable franchisees entered their agreements willfully and the patent settlements were forced on the DVR makers by actual or threatened court action.

     
  2. aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    I don't normally buy Kleenex. But like Pepsi, Coke, Xerox etc.. I only call it those things when I'm actually using those products.

    I would never call a Comcast or FiOS DVR a TiVo. That would just sound crazy.
     
  3. morac

    morac Cat God TCF Club

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    That's because you've actually used a TiVo, so you know they aren't the same.
     
  4. randian

    randian Active Member

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    The fact that Rovi = Macrovision makes me want to hate them.
     
  5. gbshuler@yahoo.c

    gbshuler@yahoo.c Clave Man

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    Sorry. You are right. The point I am trying to make is that for most people the user experience is far more important than the hardware specs.

    I read a Yelp review of a restaurant the other day:

    "This restaurant is great! Their portions are Huge!"

    Tells me nothing about the quality of food or service that makes me want to go there.

    Similar:

    "My Hopper 4 is great! It has 128 tuners, 8K, quadruple PIP football mode and more!"

    I know nothing about how the user experience is.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  6. aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    I know plenty of people that have never owned a TiVo. Yet they would never call their cable company DVR a TiVo either.
     
  7. tvmaster2

    tvmaster2 Well-Known Member

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    CNBC just did a short but on it....
     
  8. SullyND

    SullyND L: 31-14 (10-2) TCF Club

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    I think people are more likely to use TiVo as a verb than a noun, even when they do not have a TiVo.
     
  9. morac

    morac Cat God TCF Club

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    That's kind of my point. TiVo actively discouraged that and eventually the term PVR and finally DVR came about. Before that every DVR was a TiVo.

    As mentioned above, TiVo as a verb still is around.
     
  10. aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    I never understood that either. I record something. I don't DVR it or TiVo it. And I most definitely don't tape it, unless I'm using a VCR.
     
  11. atmuscarella

    atmuscarella Well-Known Member

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    Not sure what you are saying. I didn't disagree that TiVo made money from their patents. Making money is the whole reason you patent something.

    Companies have to license copyrighted or patented stuff all the time. The fact that some companies thought they could steal TiVo's Intellectual property is also not that uncommon. That's why we have courts. In the end most of these companies likely did better off than if they had paid TiVo a licensing fee up front.

    What I am saying, is that TiVos competition used their own copyrights and patents to prevent TiVo form actually competing with them. Take Dishnetwork. Anyone can put a dish up in their back yard, buy a cheap satellite STB and aim it a Dish's sats and receive all of Dish's channels. Most will be encrypted. What dish refuses to do is license their encryption software and allow access to their network so no one else can make a STB or DVR. That's called preventing competition, the fact that Dish had to pay TiVo to use their intellectual property does not prevent competition and is part of the way innovation is paid for.

    With cable, the franchise agreement has nothing to do with encryption or STBs. The FCC forced them to use an open encryption system (cable cards) and allow access to their systems via other manufactures STBs or DVRs. What everyone is licensing is the encryption system.
     
  12. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    DSS was given special exemption from CableCARD rules so from the perspective of a potential TiVo buyer there was really only one option in most areas. Also from the perspective of an internet user there is also only one option. In a few areas FIOS competes with cable and in those areas prices are typically lower and customer support is typically better. But those areas are few and far between.
     
  13. ncted

    ncted A leaf on the wind

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    For me, this is about getting out from under the hardware investment I have before it becomes worthless. I've been burned several times before, with DirecTivo HD being the most egregious, so I would rather not go through that again.
     
  14. davezatz

    davezatz Funkadelic

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  15. aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    I'd be surprised if anything becomes worthless anytime soon. For me I am now going to hold on to my Roamio PRo longer(even though I only actively use my Bolts right now). I was going to sell it but now I will hold on to it to see what happens. And I'll probably still hold on to my last Premiere(but I should have sold it over two years ago)
     
  16. mr.unnatural

    mr.unnatural Well-Known Member

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    I skipped right to the end of this thread so forgive me if someone has already mentioned this. A new app has been released over at The Green Button forums that allows WMC users to import guide data from Schedules Direct who, interestingly, get their source from Zap2It. In the past, Schedules Direct would not permit WMC users to use their guide data due to legal considerations. I suppose that since Microsoft has stopped supporting WMC the legal ramifications of using it has changed. SD is now fully supporting the use of their guide for WMC users, which is a huge plus for us.

    For a $25 annual subscription I can now get complete guide data with no worries about it running out every time the clocks change. I no longer have to deal with Microsoft dropping the ball and keeping the data updated. Even better news is that the guide will provide even more info than ever before, such as season and episode info which had been sorely lacking from the WMC guide in the past.

    What I find ironic is that a lot of people jumped ship over the past few weeks and flocked to Tivo during the recent impending outage that never took place. It's going to be interesting to see if Rovi can keep Tivo users as happy as they once were when they received their guide from Zap2It.
     
  17. ncted

    ncted A leaf on the wind

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    That is what I always think, but it always happens faster than I expect. I will wait a little while, but, unless the deal falls through, or Rovi comes out talking about going after the retail market, I will probably not wait around too long.
     
  18. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    Even with SD the last version of Windows that officially supports MCE is Windows 8. With MS pushing Win10 hard, and even threatening to automatically update people, I can't imagine MCE is going to be a viable option long term.

    I think the MCE people are going to need to hope that Silicone Dust or Ceton comes up with a viable replacement.
     
  19. gonzotek

    gonzotek tivo_xml developer

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    Sorry, I should have pinged you about it earlier, I was originally going to link straight to your blog but noticed the file was broken.
     
  20. Tanzeri

    Tanzeri New Member

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    The First Amendment prevents the Government from limiting speech and only applies in very limited circumstances to private parties. The First Amendment does not allow you to violate someone else's rights, such as misusing someone else's trademark, libeling someone, etc.

    So yes, just like you cannot prevent someone from libeling you (likely because you would not know it will happen until the libel has occurred), Tivo cannot prevent the misuse of its trademark by TV Writers, Comedians, The Present, and the Public.

    Tivo can, however, enforce the rights conferred upon it under Federal and State trademark statutes by suing or threatening to sue those misusing its trademarks.
     

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