1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Nova: Black Hole Apocolypse

Discussion in 'Now Playing - TV Show Talk' started by jamesbobo, Jan 11, 2018.

  1. jamesbobo

    jamesbobo with a grain of salt

    5,067
    46
    Jun 18, 2000
    NJ
    Yesterday, Jan. 10th, I watched this 2 hour Nova program that I think is the best show I've seen on the subject. Anyone with the slightest interest in astronomy should see this. On PBS in the New York Metro area it will replay at 3:30am Jan. 12. Your area may vary. Or you can try online or on demand. If you have kids you should watch with them.
     
    aaronwt, dfreybur and Mikeguy like this.
  2. jamesbobo

    jamesbobo with a grain of salt

    5,067
    46
    Jun 18, 2000
    NJ
    Dang, I should have put this is the TV show talk area. Can a moderator move it?
     
  3. Mikeguy

    Mikeguy Well-Known Member

    11,841
    2,806
    Jul 28, 2005
    It was recorded and awaits me--thanks for the mini-review! :)
     
  4. RGM1138

    RGM1138 I wanna Rock TCF Club

    8,267
    624
    Oct 6, 1999
    Gulfport, MS
    Thanks for the heads up. Fortunately, I can stream this from Directv.
     
  5. UCLABB

    UCLABB Well-Known Member

    2,488
    355
    May 29, 2012
    Riverside, CA
    I’m about half way through. Very good, but the Science Channel has had a lot of good stuff on this subject as well.
     
  6. Thom

    Thom Unemployed and loving it !

    2,603
    284
    Jun 5, 2000
    Southern Calif.
    You might also ask a moderator to correct the spelling of Apocalypse in the thread title.
     
  7. cheesesteak

    cheesesteak Meh. TCF Club

    31,616
    997
    Jul 24, 2003
    15 mins...
    I watched it over two nights. It was very good. Janna Levin did a good job as the lead narrator and it was nice to see more women than usual featured.
     
    nataylor likes this.
  8. bobcarn

    bobcarn Birthday Hug Monkey TCF Club

    23,721
    1,567
    Nov 18, 2001
    Trenton,...
    I found it on Tivo and set up a recording. It sounds really interesting.
     
  9. midas

    midas I heard that

    14,146
    561
    Jun 1, 2000
    Montgomery,...
    I found On Demand on Xfinity.
     
  10. JMikeD

    JMikeD Member

    612
    8
    Jun 10, 2002
    Austin, TX
    I agree on all points.
     
  11. Rob Helmerichs

    Rob Helmerichs I am Groot! TCF Club

    43,974
    2,852
    Oct 17, 2000
    Minneapolis
    Halfway through and enjoying it. But I had to chuckle at Levin's spacesuit with its (very) high-heeled boots. Even Barbarella wore flats! :D

    Is it me, or has TiVo in the Hydra era gotten really, really bad at reliably saving your location when you exit a show?
     
  12. RGM1138

    RGM1138 I wanna Rock TCF Club

    8,267
    624
    Oct 6, 1999
    Gulfport, MS
    Well, maybe in the comics. But, she wore some (low), heels in the movie.
    ;)
     
  13. Rob Helmerichs

    Rob Helmerichs I am Groot! TCF Club

    43,974
    2,852
    Oct 17, 2000
    Minneapolis
    Never saw the movie... ;)
     
  14. RGM1138

    RGM1138 I wanna Rock TCF Club

    8,267
    624
    Oct 6, 1999
    Gulfport, MS
    It was standard 60s fantasy fare. And often invaded my teenage dreams. (Thank you Roger Vadim).

    :D
     
  15. bobcarn

    bobcarn Birthday Hug Monkey TCF Club

    23,721
    1,567
    Nov 18, 2001
    Trenton,...
    I watched it through, but I had mixed feelings about it. It was entertaining enough, but kept leaning towards melodrama, which I always find annoying. Science doesn't need to be melodramatic. For example, they went on and on about how destructive they are, and how they have voracious appetites and devour everything (which is anthropomorphizing them a bit), but you had to wait until almost 15 minutes into it before they even told you what one was. And the LIGO, which is a HUGE achievement and proved gravity waves and won those scientists Nobel prizes was only talked about a little bit. Explaining how it worked was done in just a couple minutes. Following the gravity wave towards Earth made us sit through the events in prehistoric Earth as it traveled towards us. The graphics were good, and there were some interesting facts, but spreading it out with suspenseful and dramatic moments was unnecessary. It was really just the very basics of black holes with a bit of history thrown in. In two hours, I think they could have covered more.

    The piece on Cygnus X-1 was interesting. I didn't know the history of that and how the reason they found it was because they tracked its companion star orbiting something massive that wouldn't show up on a telescope. I kept thinking it would have been totally cool if they played some of "Cygnus X-1" in the background.
     
  16. Rob Helmerichs

    Rob Helmerichs I am Groot! TCF Club

    43,974
    2,852
    Oct 17, 2000
    Minneapolis
    Although for me that paid off big-time with the reveal that if the guy had stayed at work 40 minutes longer, then the gravity wave that had traveled for a billion years to reach us would have been missed.
     
  17. bobcarn

    bobcarn Birthday Hug Monkey TCF Club

    23,721
    1,567
    Nov 18, 2001
    Trenton,...
    It was a bit entertaining, but they've since been steadily detecting gravity waves of other colliding black holes. Even if that guy did work later and missed that one, they'd have caught the next. I was getting a bit frustrated every time I realized that they were spending a lot of time not talking about black holes or the LIGO.

    I did have a feeling it would be overly dramatic. I mean, the name of the show was "Black Hole Apocalypse". Maybe I missed it, but what was the apocalypse they were promoting?
     
    tim1724 likes this.
  18. jamesbobo

    jamesbobo with a grain of salt

    5,067
    46
    Jun 18, 2000
    NJ
    If memory serves me correctly (and sometimes it doesn't) near the very end of the show didn't they mention that in the end black holes would devour everything until nothing is left. I guess that could set up another big bang happening and it would start all over again. Hmmmm, what if the big bang we know of wasn't the first?
     
  19. bobcarn

    bobcarn Birthday Hug Monkey TCF Club

    23,721
    1,567
    Nov 18, 2001
    Trenton,...
    Black holes emit Hawking Radiation (something I think could have been brought up since the show was about black holes). In the absence of any more matter or energy adding to their mass, they would emit radiation, slowly lose mass, and evaporate. At least, I think that's what would happen if it eventually reached a point where all matter and energy has been collected by black holes.

    There's also the discovery that the universe is not only expanding, but that the rate of expansion is increasing, thereby moving everything further apart. They attribute this to "dark energy", which they think is something that works like the opposite of gravity. In the older models of the universe, it was feasible that we'd end up with black holes everywhere, and the universe could collapse back to a single one, maybe starting a new Big Bang (which was believed to happen when the universe didn't exist and everything was condensed to an infinitesimal point). But with everything moving further apart, this doesn't seem likely anymore. That far into the future, the scenario of what could happen is up for grabs because there's forces at work that we can only see the effects of indirectly. Dark matter and energy throw long-term predictions out the window because we don't know what they are or how they work, but there seems to be a lot of it.

    Oh, and how Hawking Radiation works is that it's postulated that because of quantum mechanics, particles spring forth into existence. They come in pairs, and are constantly just appearing. If a pair appear at the event horizon of a black hole, one particle gets pulled in, but the other travels off, taking some energy with it. Mass and energy are directly tied together. When that particle takes off stealing energy from the singularity at the center of a black hole, the singularity's mass decreases. With large stellar-mass black holes, more energy/mass is added to it than is released from Hawking Radiation because matter is always falling into the black hole. Microscopic black holes (which can form from high-energy collisions of particles such as cosmic rays) don't consume matter because they're too small to come in contact with enough of it (we're talking sizes much smaller than atoms or particles), so they evaporate quickly.
     
    dlfl likes this.
  20. Hoffer

    Hoffer Eat Lightning ----- Poo Thunder

    39,933
    945
    Jun 1, 2001
    Twin Cities, MN
    I watched this off PBS's website last night. Learned a thing or two about black holes. Thanks for the recommendation.
     

Share This Page