New $150 Lifetime Service Transfer Fee

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by SuperSpiker, Aug 16, 2009.

  1. lew

    lew Well-Known Member

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    Your logic doesn't work. I send tivo a broken unit. Tivo sends me back a refurbished unit. Tivo's inventory of units is the same--one in and one out.

    A bad hard drive is the most common source of failure. Most of us will do the repair ourselves. That doesn't change the fact that charging some customers (JMO) $300 to repair a tivo by replacing a hard drive isn't reasonable. I understand other posters don't share my opinion.




     
  2. Natron

    Natron Member

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    Greater...
    I have a dead TiVo HD (20 hours HD) with lifetime service. I am very sure it is the mother board. Assuming it is the mother board. I read from this thread I can pay for cost of repair plus $150 for lifetime transfer.
    Is there a flat rate cost of repair and how much would it be?
    Does the TiVo website have a link about this policy?
    Any advice on how to talk to the TiVo CSR request the repair and the lifetime transfer?
     
  3. ZeoTiVo

    ZeoTiVo I can't explain

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    TiVo would like to have a zero stock of series 2 units. They would rather sell the refurbs they have and not keep some parity. So looking at the repair out of warranty part of the business they decided to charge the full fees and lifetime transfer fee if applicable. They are now treating it more like a sale versus a repair and thus not have it be such a drain on resources. It is simple business math.
     
  4. ZeoTiVo

    ZeoTiVo I can't explain

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    I think the 'repair' is also a flat 150$ if the box is more than a year old. Best to call in and find out the price. There is no specific thing to ask for other than telling them what you have. You may win at CSR lotto and get a CSR that waives some of the fees. I find nice wins the lotto more often than rant.
     
  5. Brainiac 5

    Brainiac 5 New Member

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    How old is the TiVo HD? Did you originally get the lifetime service for that unit or was it transferred from an older one? The lifetime service transfer fee only applies if the unit/service is older than a certain limit (I think it's three or four years?).
     
  6. comatose

    comatose New Member

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    I already began looking into how to fix it. I've replaced/added hard drives in TiVos before (with Series 1 & 2's) so I can try that, but the point is, I shouldn't have to. My initial replacement was because of a bad IR sensor, and I was fine paying the fee to exchange it. I didn't complain, I paid the fee and that was that. Now I'm in a situation where the replacement they sent (actually the 2nd replacement they sent) failed 3 months after I got it (just past the 90 day warranty) and I have to shell out an additional $150 or find some other way to fix it. I have better ways to spend my free time than dealing with this. It's also not guaranteed to be a hard drive issue and I could spend money and time on fixing it only to find it's something different.

    I'm not complaining about the $150 service transfer fee in general, I'm complaining about my specific situation. The compromise I offered - take my broken TiVo and send me a refurb one with no lifetime service, I'll just go month-to-month - I thought was very reasonable but they can't even do that for who knows what reason.

    TiVo keeps adding all these features which are just peachy but what I use the DVR for is A) recording season passes B) watching what I recorded. I don't listen to music, surf for YouTube videos, set up wishlists, etc etc. A cable company DVR, although with a worse UI, will do fine for what I need it for. I've been holding out mostly out of loyalty to TiVo - I was a TiVo owner before 90% of people even know what a TiVo was and the only way to get them to understand was to say "it's like a VCR but without tapes...". Now my loyalty has pretty much been shot.

    And BTW, I was very polite with them on the phone every time I called (which was many times due to the many issues I was dealing with). They say there's nothing the customer service people can do to waive the $150 fee so no point in yelling at them. I'm ranting here just to let others know the experience I had.
     
  7. bicker

    bicker bUU

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    I think this really hits on something that happens a lot. In the consumer marketplace, generally speaking, unless the company accidentally screwed a customer over (i.e., there is a financially defensible reason for bypassing standard procedures and standard offerings), it is not possible for a customer-specific offering to be created to serve an individual customer's preferences. The mass-market works by capitalizing on economies of scale, and one of the ramifications of that is that, again other than in cases where the company accidentally screwed a customer over, interactions with customers must fit into those that are designed into the set of offerings.
     
  8. Natron

    Natron Member

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    I got it in 2002 so it is old. I took advantage of the offer to transfer my lifetime service from my series 2 which was transferred from my series 1. :)

    Second question: Does TiVo offer a way to upgrade the hardware instead of a repair. I need some more storage and prefer for it to be a bigger hard drive instead of the my-expander option.
     
  9. Natron

    Natron Member

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    Greater...
    So, TiVo does not show the repair prices or the lifetime service transfers on their website. I looked and could not find it.
     
  10. Phantom Gremlin

    Phantom Gremlin Active Member

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    It is if the only moving part is a hard drive. A TiVo isn't like a cellphone, which gets banged up from day to day handling and (ab)use.
     
  11. Adam1115

    Adam1115 Well-Known Member TCF Club

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    So the age of electronics is judged by how many moving parts they have? :confused:
     
  12. bicker

    bicker bUU

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    Actually, I think the best way to judge when a piece of equipment is "new" versus not new is based on the expiration of the initial warranty. By the time the warranty expires, the device is absolutely not new.
     
  13. wierdo

    wierdo New Member

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    So if TiVo had a 90 day warranty, you'd say that a TiVo failing after 6 months wasn't quite premature?

    Based on my experience with previous TiVos, I'd say failure after 15 months is quite premature. More so if you exclude the simple failed hard drive.

    I could enumerate the longevity of each of my TiVos, but suffice it to say that four years is a more normal lifetime for the boxes I had. Other than the failed THD, my only other (TiVo) electronics failure was the S2 that used to have my lifetime service before the transfer offer. Its power supply failed. Another relatively easy replacement...

    I was under the impression that the THD had moved the crypto chip functionality (which contains the TSN) into one of the Broadcom chips, thus making it impossible for third parties to swap the motherboard and keep your TSN (and lifetime) intact. If that's not the case, I may be doing some desoldering and resoldering. (I have a spare THD) ;)
     
  14. bicker

    bicker bUU

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    No. I'd say that a TiVo is not "new" on Day 91.

    Read the message you replied to again, more closely. You'll see that you grossly misread what I wrote.

    <lots of irrelevant blah blah blah snipped>
     
  15. wierdo

    wierdo New Member

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    Oddly, I'd say a TiVo (or any product) is not "new" the moment you take it out of the box and power it on for the first time. Luckily for me, I used the phrase "nearly new," not "new."

    I believe you may have missed the "nearly," thus causing the disagreement at hand. ;)
     
  16. samo

    samo New Member

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    TiVo does have 90 days warranty. After 90 days you have to pay to get it exchanged for a refurb (technically TiVo claims that you have 1 year parts warranty, but since they do not repair your units it amounts to the discount on the exchange fee).
    Also there is almost universally accepted definition of the new product.
    The product is no longer new after title to the product (ownership) is transferred from the retailer to the consumer by bill of sale or any other contract or legal instrument.
    Your car is no longer new as soon as you sign on the bottom line and take delivery (drive it off the dealer's lot). Your house is no longer new after the title was transferred to you from the builder. Your TiVo is no longer new after you paid for it and took delivery (if you return it to the dealer or TiVo it can only be sold as refurbished).
     
  17. bicker

    bicker bUU

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    Indeed, by wierdo's logic, we're all still "nearly" infants even though our warranty's ran out decades ago. :)
     
  18. kimifelipe

    kimifelipe Guest

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    I don't agree. Tivo is not far and away the best dvr. Not even close. I think the fios dvr is very nearly as good overall, and in terms of the user interface, the fios dvr is notably better than the Tivo.
     
  19. NatasNJ

    NatasNJ Bone marrow lover!

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    The Fios DVR has many more Season passes issues, MUCH slower response times, not as friendly interface, etc.. etc...

    The only DVR I thought was comparable to the TIVO is the Directv newer DVR. It is pretty close and user friendly.
     
  20. kimifelipe

    kimifelipe Guest

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    Honestly my experience is just exactly the opposite. I have four working season passes, haven't missed a recording, and I find the interface significantly faster than the tivo interface. Not to mention the substantially more user-friendly guide and settings pages.

    I like my tivo, but it's not the interface or reliability (exactly the opposite; I'm waiting on my second replacement) that makes it the marginally better dvr that it is compared to the fios dvr.

    Now, if you compare the tivo to my directv hr22, then I agree, the tivo is substantially better (excepting the fact that you can record about 1/4 as much programming on the tivo). The hr22 is an unmitigated piece of shyte. It can take up to 4 seconds to change a channel, the interface is cutting edge 1997, it is unreliable, and the guide doesn't display much information. The only positive in its favor is the size of the hard drive, that is it.

    I'm sorry you've had such a bad experience with the fios dvr, but honestly, I am thinking about just keeping it when my (free) fios dvr trial is up, next to my tivo. The fios dvr is excellent.
     

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