Netflix issues

Discussion in 'TiVo Series3 HDTV DVRs' started by TiVoStephen, Dec 15, 2008.

  1. szurlo

    szurlo Member

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    Jul 11, 2002
    Lexington, SC

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    I got it on sale for $259 at Best Buy, (regular price $299). And it plays all kinds of stuff via disk, USB drive or LAN via DLNA servers, even .mkv and DivX. Does NetFLix, YouTube, Divx VOD, Cinemanow and Vudu also. Manual does not list .m2ts files as supported.
     
  2. dlfl

    dlfl Cranky old novice

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    Dayton OH
    What are the main advantages of the LG BD-390 over the Samsung BD-P1600, which sells for only $149 at Amazon? It looks like built-in wireless .11n might be one of them. The LG unit weighs twice as much and is larger, for what that's worth. The LG unit has 1 GB of RAM but don't know what the Samsung has, or how important that is.
     
  3. szurlo

    szurlo Member

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    Jul 11, 2002
    Lexington, SC
    Unless I'm mistaken, the Samsung player is not a DLNA device and cannot stream content from a server on your local network like the LG player can. The LG player also has a USB port that you can plug any FAT 32 formatted storage device into and play music, photos and video on the player.
     
  4. HD_Dude

    HD_Dude I Want HD in my Car

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    Sep 11, 2006
    Washington, DC
    I'd like to add my vote to the group that says Netflix just doesn't work on their S3.

    I have two S3's, and they work perfectly. 100% dependable. They're on my CAT5 hardwired home network, on a very fast FIOS internet service.

    I use the S3's a lot. Each of them has twin Verizon CableCards installed. For years now - perfect.

    On one of them, I have the Apricorn DVR Expander hooked up to give me a terrabyte of storage...perfect.

    I use Tivo to Go, streaming the videos to my laptop over my home network - perfect.

    My kids record Disney shows in HD and play them back, and it all works fine.

    The only problem I have with the machines - the only one - is Netflix.

    Netflix causes both machines to lock up. Every time I've tried using Netflix, the machine plays the movie for a few minutes, then freezes. I have to re-boot at that point.

    We have a really nice tradition in our home - Family Movie Night on Fridays. The Netflix on Tivo has messed that up twice....freezing machines, re-boots...stuff that has the kids looking to me and saying 'Dad? Why won't it work?'

    My answer: it just doesn't.

    Fortunately, I have other options. I have a fast Sony Tower PC integrated into my home theatre, so I can watch Netflix over the internet instead. Or, I can watch Tivo'ed shows, DVD's, Blu-Ray, live TV, or - horrors - HD on Demand through my Verizon box.

    With all these options, I don't ever plan to let Netflix on Tivo ruin another Friday Night Family Movie Night.

    Now don't get me wrong: I'm a big Tivo fan. Great company, great customer service, great product. The same is true of Netflix...I really enjoy it. But, I just think that for me, the marriage of the two products is a disaster.
     
  5. moyekj

    moyekj Well-Known Member

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    Mission...

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    Problem is that the quality of Netflix streams to a PC is significantly worse than quality of TiVo Netflix streams. Because of this and against better judgment I tried TiVo/Netflix again on an S3 that I had to reboot before due to TiVo/Netflix induced freezing and sure enough on the 3rd stream it froze again and I had to reboot. I am now seriously considering buying a Blu Ray player with Netflix streaming capabilities so I can still get the good quality Netflix streams while avoiding this flaky TiVo/Netflix solution and associated freezes.
     
  6. morac

    morac Cat God TCF Club

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    NJ
    I have a Sony Bravia Internet Video Link (DMX-NV1) and a PS3. Both can do Netflix and the video quality on all of them is similar. The PS3's interface is a lot better than both the TiVo's and the NV1, but it requires a disk which makes it less than ideal. With the NV1 I can use my TV's remote and it has a large buffer, but the interface is very slow and it doesn't show the still images during fast forward or rewind. If the TiVo's Netflix implementation was completely stable and worked better I would prefer it simply for ease of use, but as it is I prefer the NV1.
     
  7. mikeyts

    mikeyts Stream Warrior

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    Jul 10, 2004
    San Diego,...
    I have a TiVo Series3, Xbox and PS3 and, since I replaced my old Xbox with a new, unbelievably-much-quieter model, I prefer its interface to the other two. (I rarely chose to watch video on the old Xbox because I couldn't stand the noise and used TiVo for Netflix, with which I rarely had any problems). The Xbox Netflix GUI is roughly functionally equivalent to the PS3's, but it's superior to it in a few ways. First, you can press the remote PLAY key to start playback of any selected item from the title browser. Secondly, the way that the Xbox player handles TV series is a truly excellent piece of design. If you press PLAY on the title in the browser, it starts playing the episode you were last watching from where you left off, and if you'd finished that episode, it starts playing the next (in the TiVo player, when you select the series title it shows you an episode list, but with no indication of which episode you viewed last). The way the PS3 player handles TV series is better than TiVo (it knows the episode you were last watching) but not as good as the Xbox in that you have to drill down a couple of menu levels to see the episodes, strangely presented in a horizontal list of episode numbers, with only one episode title visible. Finally, I play games and watch Blu-ray discs on my PS3 and changing the disc to watch Netflix streaming is beyond annoying.
     
  8. rcoates777

    rcoates777 Member

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    Jun 28, 2005
    I've had "retrieving" problems with Netflix and my wireless TiVo ever since the service started. It was so bad that I seldom used it. My "speakeasy" speedtests show 15000+ kbs / 4600 kbs for download and upload respectively from my laptop which is further away from the router than the TiVo but I don't know what speed the TiVo is actually achieving.

    Today I installed a hardwire Ethernet connection and had not a single "retrieving" issue. With wireless I got one every couple of minutes.

    I used to see a TiVo signal strength indicator for the wireless but I can't locate that any more.

    The Netflix people said that they don't have many reports of problems with "retrieving".

    What does the "quality" indicator mean for the Netflix broadcasts? Is that a signal strength indicator?

    Thanks,

    Bob
     
  9. HD_Dude

    HD_Dude I Want HD in my Car

    260
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    Sep 11, 2006
    Washington, DC
    A few posts above, I mentioned Netflix doesn't work well enough to be useable on my S3, despite FIOS and a very fast, hardwired network.

    So yesterday I got the Netflix disc for the PS3. Worked perfectly.

    Picture quality was excellent, sound quality awesome. And, using the PS3 remote control, I could pause, rewind, resume...and most of all, the content was stable. No freezes, glitches, or issues at all.

    Putting in the disc is fine. And I like the interface. Problem solved.

    Note to Tivo: don't worry about it. You do what you were intended to do, perfectly. When it comes to recording HD content year after year, you're the king. Don't sweat all this periferal stuff.
     
  10. Glanzer

    Glanzer New Member

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    Dec 31, 2009
    Columbus, OH
    I have a Netflix enabled HDTV (Sony Bravia KDL-40W5100) and a TiVo HD. Before I got the TiVo we were watching Netflix streaming movies on our TV. With certain Netflix shows (not all, but some) it kept stopping every minute or two and resyncing and trying to catch up. The speakeasy Internet throughput tests showed a consistent 12,000+ Mbps download and 400k upload, so I thought the network and ISP were fine. Note that our house is hardwired for Internet in each room with Cat5e, and we have a GB router that connects everything to a Linux server that is then connected to the Roadrunner Internet modem. We've never had any problem with the network and we have multiple computers on the Internet throughout our house. We are not using wireless.

    So... I called Sony support and worked with them for a while on the Netflix problem and they could not help me. I then called Netflix and received excellent support. The woman on the phone did all the normal things she could, then finally transferred me to 2nd level support. Through some experimentation Netflix support found that the problematic shows were only the HD ones; all the regular SD shows were fine. That seemed to indicate a bandwidth or throughput connection of some type on my home network or possibly to/from my ISP. Using that information I ran a network cable directly from my Roadrunner modem to the TV and the problem disappeared. So now I knew that the problem was somewhere in my home network. I eventually traced the problem to a network card (NIC) in my Linux gateway server that was set for 10 Mb Half Duplex. Apparently the NIC was not auto-configuring itself to 100 Mb Full Duplex when it synced with my router. To fix it I had to download a NIC utility from the manufacturer to change the card to 100 MB Full Duplex. WOW, what a difference! My speakeasy test now shows a consistent 28,000 Mbps download and over 500k upload. And it also fixed all my Netflix problems. I can now watch any Netflix HD movie on my TV or my Tivo with no problems.

    So all of you who have stuttering and resyncing problems with Netflix, the first thing I'd do is bypass your wireless and try running a network cable directly to your Netflix device. If you're already hardwired then try running a network cable directly to your TiVo from your Internet modem. If that solves the problem then you know it's somewhere on your network. It might even be a bad network cable. Also, if you haven't updated the firmware in your network switch/router/cable mode/etc then be sure to do that.
     
  11. rcoates777

    rcoates777 Member

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    Jun 28, 2005
    One more thing that I forgot to include in my post #808 about my "retrieving" pauses with wireless TiVo.

    After I went in and changed my TiVo configuration to a hardwired Ethernet I still had the problem. But I noticed that my USB connected wireless adapter was still flashing a lot while I was watching a show. (I had left it plugged in even after installing the hardwire.)

    So I unplugged it and the show I was watching stopped dead in its tracks. So even though TiVo had told me it was using the new hardwire it really wasn't. I started up the show again and it worked great - obviously using my new Ethernet cable.

    Management Summary: be sure to unplug the wireless adapter after you reconfigure.
     
  12. markp99

    markp99 TakoKichi TCF Club

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    Mar 21, 2002
    Nashua, NH
    Just started Netflix streaming to my TiVo S3 this week. Connected via Cat5 to my router via a switch.

    Works like a charm! "HD" quality is a bit of a stretch, but certainly equal or better than DVD. I've had just a couple pause/retrieve instances around mid-day, no other network traffic in the house.

    We are liking this option very nicely to catch up on TV series and movies we've missed.

    All other content is in my Blu-Ray queue.
     
  13. Jan 5, 2010 #813 of 992
    dlfl

    dlfl Cranky old novice

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    Dayton OH
    New issue for me just started today: Several times in the middle of a three different videos, it kicked completely back to the NPL list. No retreiving bars or any other indication of a problem before it suddenly does this. Plays fine after a restart. Anyone else seeing this behavior?
     
  14. Jan 6, 2010 #814 of 992
    szurlo

    szurlo Member

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    Jul 11, 2002
    Lexington, SC
    Yes, I have had that happen a few times, but it is not a recent development. It happened to me the first time several months ago.
     
  15. Jan 8, 2010 #815 of 992
    Max Camber

    Max Camber Member

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    Oct 30, 2009
    Denver, CO
    I have experienced the same thing a few times, none recently. It seems to be fine on the second attempt so I assume it is a connection issue rather than something in the data.
     
  16. Jan 8, 2010 #816 of 992
    flaminiom

    flaminiom New Member

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    Dec 27, 2008
    Holt, MI
    I did some searching, but here's my question... it's more about networking, but with the high bandwidth Netflix app.

    I've got the old 802.11b adapter on my TivoHD.

    If I understand correctly, I probably won't gain anything with a 802.11g adapter. Is this correct?

    Is the data throughput a limitation of the Tivo, or the USB interface?

    If I work on my setup and get a strong 802.11b signal, that should be faster than my Internet can provide. If, however, the USB adapter bottle necks, and Tivo can transfer faster over Ethernet, I may finally bite the bullet and run cat-6 out there. Even the TV now has ethernet...
     
  17. Jan 8, 2010 #817 of 992
    dlfl

    dlfl Cranky old novice

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    Dayton OH
    Without fully understanding the technical details, there is a strong consensus in the posts on this forum that you need a wired internet connection for the best chance of good Netflix performance. I've seen no technical explanation for this but it's reality. There probably are people with wireless connections who get good performance (and they tend not to post since they aren't having problems). There definitely are people even with high speed wired connections who still have problems (and they do post).

    My guess would be that 11g would be better than 11b if you have to stick with wireless. Do you have a computer with wired connection to your internet that you can use to test the download speed? Two good test sites are speedtest.net and testmy.net. If your download speeds are averaging less than 5 Mbps, you may have problems regardless of the wireless adapter you use.
     
  18. Jan 8, 2010 #818 of 992
    bicker

    bicker bUU

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    One of the things I think a lot of us don't understand, until it is explained to us, is that if we're using wireless, our transmissions could be interfered with by transmissions from other folks using wireless. GREATLY SIMPLIFIED AND REDUCED IN DETAIL: There are about a dozen "channels" for wireless, but each channel substantially overlaps with four other channels. Also most folks are using only one of three of the available channels (think of them as top, middle and bottom, and this is the case, ostensibly because of the overlap I mentioned). Data collisions is the reason, I suspect, why a wired connection would be better, perhaps even if the wired connection is rated a little slower than the wireless connection.
     
  19. Jan 8, 2010 #819 of 992
    flaminiom

    flaminiom New Member

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    Dec 27, 2008
    Holt, MI
    Maybe to boil down my question...

    Is the Tivo HD wireless even able to reach 802.11b capabilities? I thought I read somewhere it's bottle-necked by the Tivo hardware or the USB port or something.

    I mean, I could work on my wireless network to get ~6 Mb/sec to the living room, but if that's pushing the limits of the Tivo, I should just run ethernet.
     
  20. Jan 8, 2010 #820 of 992
    szurlo

    szurlo Member

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    Jul 11, 2002
    Lexington, SC
    The issue in the TiVo wireless VS wired debate is not as much about bandwidth as it is connection quality. Even the slowest wi-fi standard, 802.11b, at 11mbs, is as fast, or faster than the majority of residential internet connections and should be plenty fast enough to stream netflix content. The problem with wi-fi is the packet loss and latency resulting from all the environmental issues that can effect successful radio wave propagation and reception. Everything from antenna placement to building construction materials can effect your connection. I had a customer once who used to get wi-fi disconnects when they stood in certain areas of the office because of the effect their body had on the signal path. My wi-fi used to drop every time my 2.4GHz cordless phone handset would ring. Even if you move to 802.11n, which in theory would be faster then 100Mbs over CAT5, the same pit-falls of using radio transmitters and receivers to get your data to your TiVo still exist.
     

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