Need a streaming TiVo

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by k2ue, Apr 19, 2018.

  1. k2ue

    k2ue Retired RF Engineer

    716
    33
    May 9, 2002
    Victor, NY

    Advertisements

    Things are changing. . . I can now get Spectrum streaming of the locals plus 10 channels of my choice for less than my current Spectrum cableTV service -- BUT we almost never watch real-time. So what we really need is a TiVo-like device that can deal with streamed real-time channels, instead of cable channels.

    There was a glimmer of hope when PlayOn was released, but it turns out to be an immature product with cryptic instructions and a less than friendly interface. The only plus is that it it does do commercial-skip on playback -- which is smarted that commercial-skip on record like Plex, as viewing access is delayed, and you can't watch it without skip if the skip butchered the content.

    So any other streaming-compatible TiVo-like candidates?
     
  2. tenthplanet

    tenthplanet Well-Known Member

    1,628
    486
    Mar 5, 2004
    Play on also operated in a legal gray area..The problem isn't hardware, it's streaming rights and that can be messy, legally messy. Lets say Spectrum would allow you to record from their streaming services and you wanted to record NBC, NBC needs to allow it. If you want an NBC local they have to be on-board. Eventually all major OTT streaming service providers will have the cloud recording better then what exits now, the question is how much life is there in the idea of hardware dvr. While this all sorts out, Sling TV and Sony PS Vue have decent cloud dvr's worth trying on their services.
    Bottom line there is no Tivo/Tivo like boxes for streaming yet.
     
  3. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

    4,294
    2,134
    May 2, 2015
    There will never be a TiVo for streaming services. Recording on local hard drives is becoming a thing of the past. Frankly, high-powered local computing devices (such as PCs) will become a thing of the past. The smarts will increasingly exist in the cloud, in edge networks, with the devices consumers typically use being low-powered terminals for accessing network services. That's where the economics of always-on fast internet connections are leading us. You can try to resist it but eventually you won't be able to.

    The internet is eating your TV.
     
  4. tenthplanet

    tenthplanet Well-Known Member

    1,628
    486
    Mar 5, 2004
    Till it goes out, internet service can still be fragile at times.
     
    Mikeguy likes this.
  5. k2ue

    k2ue Retired RF Engineer

    716
    33
    May 9, 2002
    Victor, NY

    Advertisements

    Growing up in the 50's I'm a little jaundiced about technology predictions -- all those flying cars we were going to have, and the world only needing a few powerful computers. A friend who was JPL scientist was asked to project technology the year before the transistor was invented, so he cited "very small vacuum tubes" in the future.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2018
  6. Anotherpyr

    Anotherpyr Active Member

    465
    125
    May 6, 2015
    I think the licensing will kill offline local storage. It’s foolish to think that high speed streaming is available 7/24 everywhere in the country. But that isn’t their concern. They are so worried about piracy that they’ll ruin their products to prevent it. Personally I can just walk away from it. Plenty of other content I can download and watch without all the legal strings.
     
    kpeters59 likes this.
  7. jcthorne

    jcthorne Well-Known Member

    3,116
    196
    Jan 28, 2002
    Houston
    On non-existant. There are large areas of our country that do not have access to broadband internet. Our vacation home in Colorado does not. It does have a DSL line but its very slow. Nearly useless for full HD content streaming. Perhaps 5G wireless will eventually solve this but its at least a decade away.
     
  8. jcthorne

    jcthorne Well-Known Member

    3,116
    196
    Jan 28, 2002
    Houston
    There are other ways of capturing the streaming content you pay for and watch it later. Don't know of any with great software interfaces but the hardware is there. Stand alone video capture devices are easy to use and work very well but no one is doing DVR like interface software to automate them. Think of a VCR with no timer. Press record. Press Stop.
     
  9. TonyD79

    TonyD79 Well-Known Member

    12,808
    2,033
    Jan 4, 2002
    Columbia, MD
    Have the courts ruled yet? They side with the consumer on recording linear video for personal use. I can see them extending that to streaming. At least linear streaming like directv now or OTT systems.
     
  10. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

    4,294
    2,134
    May 2, 2015
    It's not just the legal aspect. More basically, it's the practical aspects of how a consumer can actually record the streams. The only way I see this being done is if the streaming is through a web browser on a PC/Mac and the recording software also resides there. None of the major companies that own the app/hardware streaming platforms that we use for TV/phones/tablets -- Apple, Google, Roku, Amazon -- is going to allow something like PlayOn or any other "streaming DVR" solution to work directly on their platforms.

    PlayOn works only on Windows PCs and, I believe, only supports a max resolution of 720p. I guess if you're really concerned with saving money, maybe it's worth it to "harvest" and record lots of content off of Netflix, etc. during one month while you're a paying subscriber, then drop the subscription and watch all of your recordings through PlayOn in inferior HD picture quality for the next few months. The devices you can watch are on are limited too. Meh.
     
  11. jcthorne

    jcthorne Well-Known Member

    3,116
    196
    Jan 28, 2002
    Houston
    You can buy a capture device from a number of companies. Avermedia and Hauppauge both sell them, there are many others. I have one from Avermedia that works just fine for my personal use. Full 1080p60 resolution. Only stereo audio though.
     
  12. Mikeguy

    Mikeguy Well-Known Member

    27,636
    9,211
    Jul 28, 2005
    Jeez, those suckers can be expensive.
     
  13. Worf

    Worf Well-Known Member

    2,608
    176
    Sep 15, 2000
    Got a model number on it?

    Most of them I found will support a 1080p60 signal input, but they only record at 1080p30. This is so gamers can get their full rate signal to their TV but it's only recording internally at 30fps and dropping every other frame.

    There's also the other issue of HDCP, all capture devices do not support it and cannot be certified to support it (it's a violation of the HDCP agreement, so it's a legal thing), and many streaming services now check to see if the link is protected.

    I suppose the real reason no one supports it is well, they want you to use their "cloud DVR" service - so as part of your service fee they toss in the DVR on their end so you don't need extra equipment and can access it anywhere.
     
  14. jcthorne

    jcthorne Well-Known Member

    3,116
    196
    Jan 28, 2002
    Houston
  15. drhendrix

    drhendrix Member

    47
    1
    Jan 3, 2003
    Loveland, OH
    Would this be useful? There is support on the Kodi forum. You could build your own system.
     
  16. jcthorne

    jcthorne Well-Known Member

    3,116
    196
    Jan 28, 2002
    Houston
    Playon is limited to 720p and stereo audio so its a non-starter for many. Just too limited.
     
  17. lafos

    lafos Well-Known Member

    1,428
    33
    Nov 7, 2004
    Sioux Falls, SD
    I worked for a company about 20 years ago that wanted everything on servers, where we had terminals to do our work. It was a failure, and didn't save money but did annoy a lot of folks. The early days of computers were also terminals off a mainframe. I think the concept you describe will eventually take place, but in the meantime, all of my data are stored on servers in my house, including backups of my cloud content.

    Maybe I just have trust issues. I won't depend on anyone to store my information. I keep copies of copies on mirrored drives.
     
  18. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

    4,294
    2,134
    May 2, 2015
    Yeah the thin client model -- "the network is the computer" -- has been around a long time. But it's gradually becoming more and more realistic. And I'm not saying that we will (or should) ever get to a point where our local devices store zero data or do zero processing. But with fast connections, tons of available cloud storage and the growth of edge computing, more and more of our stuff is just streamed to our devices as we need it. I still carry a library of MP3s around on my phone (remember the original iPhone with its music player app named iPod?) but I'm sure I'm in the minority there now. At some point, we'll be able to stream high-res games with low enough latency that there won't be a need for the kind of high-end hardware like the latest Xbox and PS systems. The technical requirements for storing and streaming HD video are well less than for high-end games, though, which is why we're already starting to see cloud DVRs replace local DVRs.
     
  19. jcthorne

    jcthorne Well-Known Member

    3,116
    196
    Jan 28, 2002
    Houston
    The thin client vs distributed computing models have gone back and forth several times already. Its cyclical and just swinging that way at the moment again. It is not a final destination.
     
  20. lafos

    lafos Well-Known Member

    1,428
    33
    Nov 7, 2004
    Sioux Falls, SD
    With the hacking issues out there, keeping personal data in the cloud or depending on a WAN for computing has risks that I can't necessarily guard myself. A server on my LAN with no WAN access at least gives me the illusion of security. And I only connect to it when I need it in case I get hit by ransomware.
     

Share This Page

spam firewall

Advertisements