My successful 540040 upgrade experience

Discussion in 'TiVo Upgrade Center' started by rick123, Feb 5, 2005.

  1. Feb 5, 2005 #1 of 53
    rick123

    rick123 Member

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    Dec 8, 2004
    I thought other new owners of the 540040 (and other 540 series) might find this helpful...

    I am new to Tivo as of Christmas, and of course am already a big fan. Even before we bought the Tivo, I knew from my online reading that I would upgrade the hard drive when I had the time and felt I had a good grasp of the procedure. I have built our last 3 computer systems, so I felt comfortable with the idea of working with hard drives and their mobo connections. IMO prior computer upgrade experience is not required, but if you don't have it you should spend a good amount of time reviewing the hardware hookup procedures.

    After reading thru the several guides out there, I decided on using the instructions found at tivo.upgrade-instructions.com. That particular site makes it easy to choose between several upgrade options and customizes instructions based on the choices made.

    From what I had read here and around the net the easiest upgrade to do today is to just upgrade to a bigger drive. Why bother to eek out an extra 40gb from the original drive when there are 2-300gb drives to be had for short money? Plus, no extra brackets required and you keep the original drive as a backup so you don't need to make a separate backup either. Anyway, my upgrade was to replace the original Tivo 40gb drive with a Seagate 200gb/8mb cache/7200 rpm HD. I chose to copy the entire contents of the Tivo HD (all my recorded programs) cause I don't like live tv anymore if Tivo can keep me away from it!

    (3/22/05 - Since this thread seems to be getting many reads, wanted to ad that I suggest you hook up your tivo and get it running prior to doing an upgrade to ensure your unit works. I also highly recommend that you allow your unit to get the 7.1 (tivotogo) software upgrade PRIOR to doing the upgrade.)

    How it went:

    I bought one of those Torx screwdrivers at Home Depo for like $5.00. Came with multiple adapters which included the T-10 and T-15. You need both sizes on the 540040 model. The 540040 has 5 T-10 screws that hold the top on along the back panel. These came undone easily on my unit. The top slid back and lifted off without effort once the screws were out.

    The first thing I did was look for that white/grey power wire that many posting around the net warn about; the one that if you boot up with it loose your remote won't work any more and other bad things. It was there, sticking out of a slot in the front panel (you could not see where that end connected) and running to a connection on the edge of the front of the mobo. Although on this unit the connection to the motherboard appears very solid, I was careful to do my best to avoid touching this at all and did check it before closing up just in case. Possibly the design of the connection has been improved since there were so many reported problems.

    Next I removed the hard drive power wire and IDE cable, being careful to avoid the exposed power supply (I had the unit unplugged for about 2 hours to be safe, but still avoided the PS.). The Tivo hard drive in this unit is mounted on a bracket that is held down on the front side by 2 T-10 screws. After placing the power and IDE wires out of the way, I next removed the 2 T-10 screws that hold the front edge of the hard drive bracket in place. Once these screws are removed, the back edge of the bracket slides out of 2 retaining clips and the hard drive lifts out of the unit.

    The hard drive is held on the bracket with 4 T-15 screw that came off easily, releasing the Tivo HD.

    Now time to hook up the drives to a computer. I am lucky to have many spare parts around from my system builds, specifically spare IDE cables and a spare CD drive. (A new hard drive usually comes with an IDE cable, so even if you don't have a spare CD drive you will have an extra cable). Having the extra cable allows you to hook up your hard drives properly while outside the computer, which I found much easier.

    As the instructions say you must set the HD jumpers correctly. The Tivo hard drive in my unit was set as cable select; there was a jumper diagram on the Tivo HD that showed how to set the jumper to master as called for in the instructions. The replacement HD is set to slave. After setting the jumpers, I connected the IDE cable to both (master is at the end of the cable and slave is in the middle, although I'm not sure this really matters as long as the jumpers are set correctly...) and set them aside. I then connected a second IDE cable to my spare CD drive, which was set and jumpered as slave. Using this method, you just need to disconnect the IDE cables in the computer you are using from the motherboard, move these Tivo drives close to the open computer (I had to prop them set up on a shoe box next to the open side panel close enough for the IDE and power plugs to reach), and then connect the ends of the IDE cables from the Tivo drives and the cd drive to the proper IDE channels on the computer mobo (in my instructions the cd drive connects to the primary IDE channel on the mobo and the hard drives connects to the secondary IDE channel). Then you need to find some spare (or unplug) power connectors in your computer and connect these to your hard drives and cd drive. (if you don't have a spare cd drive, I would recommend sliding your drive out of your system and working with it outside the system, then put it back when you are done. You are going to have to take it out to check/change the jumpers anyway, just keep it out then put it back the way it was when you are done.).

    Any set of instructions you find cautions to not boot into Windows XP with a TIVO drive connected or the drive will be ruined. With your original IDE cables unplugged your XP system drive is disconnected, unless like me your xp drive is a SATA drive! (Your system could also use a separate PCI IDE adapter card) BE SURE that your xp system drive is not connected when you boot up with the Tivo drive connected.

    One last thing to do, gotta go into the computer bios and set the system to boot from the cd drive. Each system is different, so the system manual becomes your friend. The options are usually under a heading called Boot with sub-headings of boot order or similar names. I WISH I HAD DONE THIS PRIOR TO OPENING AND UNHOOKING MY SYSTEM, I suggest doing this before opening up the system, but it didn't matter in the end...

    Once the system was set to boot from the cd drive, I powered on the system and got the drive door open, upgrade disc in (downloaded from the link in the instructions that were specific to my upgrade choices), and door closed before the system was done the boot sequence. You could also put the disc in prior to hooking it up or power on the system, put in the disc, power off, then reboot... Anyway, since nothing is ever completely without issues for me, my boot disc was not burned properly and did not boot. Fortunately, we have other systems in the house that I was able to download and burn a new disc with. If you can, check your disc first.

    Anyway, that issue solved, the system booted from the disc with a welcome message and a statement to press enter when ready. I did, and numbers and data flashed by quickly for about 5-10 sec. When done, there was a "weaknees:" prompt. As the instructions direct, this is where you use the shift and page up keys to go back thru the data that flashed by and check to be sure that the software can see the actual size of both of your hard drives. This is also a good time to check and make note of the actual HD designator assigned to your hard drives by the software based on the drive location (master/slave, primary/secondary). They should be hdc=Original Tivo HD, hdd=New drive if you set them up as instructed. The software recognized both my drives (I'm guessing the "locked drive" issues may be something that might not happen on series 2 systems such as the 540 series, but you need to check and be ready in case...), so I was set to enter the copy command.

    With my set-up, the command to back up the entire drive to the new drive was:

    mfsbackup -Tao - /dev/hdc | mfsrestore -s 127 -xzpi - /dev/hdd

    where hdc is the Tivo drive and hdd is the new replacement drive. Don't really know what it means but it works. I was very confused and unsure about what I was actually going to type at this point, but after I checked the data and hard drive sizes and saw the associated hdc/hdd designators in the data it became clear to me, your results may vary...

    When I hit enter the software began to back up the original Tivo drive to the new drive. The software gives a running count of its progress as a percentage completed. The entire backup took just over 20 minutes on my system (a 3.06 P4 with 1gb ram, don't know if system specs matter or not as far as time to completion?). When done, I got a nice message that said: "New estimated standalone size 222 hours (182 more)". SWEET...

    Time to put Tivo back together. First thing I noticed was both hard drives were warm, the original Tivo drive was actually hot. Anyway, the rest is rather easy. Jumper the new drive as master as per instructions, then put the new drive back in the bracket using the 4 T-15 screws, put the bracket back in the Tivo, screw the bracket in place with 2 T-10 screws, reconnect the IDE cable and power wire (be careful in all of this to stay clear of the dreaded "white/grey power cable issue"), then put the top back on (5 T-10 screws).

    Reconnect the tivo to your tv/video system and power it on. I did get a scare here as the first static screen that Tivo displayed (something like welcome...) lasted about a minute. The next screen (something like "almost there, just a few more minutes") lasted about 90 seconds. I did notice that when I first plugged the Tivo into the system the front panel power light came on, even though I had shut it off under options on the previous drive. Toward the end of the second static screen, it went off.

    All is well, Tivo reported the massive new capacity under system info. All the previously recorded shows were there. Only small bummer, the new hard drive does make an slightly audible "seek" sound where the original did not. Just sitting there doing nothing it is no more or less noisy than the original, with my limited use so far it appears the seek sound is happening moving thru some menu's or after deleting a program, etc, not playing a program. Our Tivo is in the open on a shelf under the TV, if it was in a case I am sure I would never have noticed the seek sound. I'm sure each brand of hard drive is different, but overall I would say the seek sound is a non-factor given the resulting increase in capacity.

    I hope this helped some of you who may be on the fence about upgrading your Tivo. With the proper preparation and research the entire project can take under 2 hours. Do your homework, and you too will have a Tivo with a massive storage capacity!

    Rick
    NH, USA
     
  2. suggest THIS

    suggest THIS New Member

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    Jan 12, 2005
    Thanks for posting this! I have the same setup, and I'm planning to upgrade soon. Your post has simplified the process for me.
     
  3. rick123

    rick123 Member

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    Dec 8, 2004
    I figured that many newbies like me got a 540040 for the holidays. I hoped that reading my experience would make others feel more comfortable.

    After a week all is well, sure is nice to not worry about filling the thing up. The added slight seek noise I mentioned from my Seagate is really hardly noticable, otherwise the unit is quiet as a mouse.

    Prepare well and things should go smoothly.

    Good luck

    Rick
     
  4. darkcyber

    darkcyber New Member

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    Mar 16, 2005
    Yes, thanks! I just got a tivo and was wanting to do the same thing...upgrade the hd in my 40 hours 540 unit. Your instructions seem simply enough...now just got to find all the software I need to do it with :)

    One question...how do you know what model you have...i.e. you posted yours was a 54040. I looked on the web site your gave a link to and they have a 540040, 540080 and a 540140. If it's going by the servicel number then I don't see one that matches mine. Mine is a 5400001.

    Help! :eek:
     
  5. rick123

    rick123 Member

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    Dec 8, 2004
    My tivo is a 540040 as my post describes. I'm not at home to look but I'm guessing that the model # is on the back of the tivo or you could find it in the sytem info section of the tivo menu.

    Once you figure out which tivo you have (if your tivo is silver with a white plastic front and 40 hrs you probably have a 540040, but be sure before you begin.), you just need to go thru and select the options at the interactive upgrade page at Weaknees and the site will provide a link to download the correct software for your backup. Click to download the software, burn it as an iso, and you have the software needed for the backup.

    Be careful, take your time.

    Good luck
     
  6. bigpoppadawg

    bigpoppadawg Bigpoppadawg

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    Mar 18, 2005
    I have a TDC540040 and I upgraded my drive this weekend....I did things a little different I used dd to copy the original drive to the new drive...then ran mfsadd.
    Everything went off without a hitch....I highly recommend the new units...they handle the large drives (over 137) gb...without custom kernels...

    Bigpoppadawg
    Never Fake the Funk....!!!
     
  7. darkcyber

    darkcyber New Member

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    Mar 16, 2005

    Where did you get your instructions from and software to upgrade yours? I plan on using a 160 gig hd and want it to be as simple as possible.
     
  8. darkcyber

    darkcyber New Member

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    Mar 16, 2005
    Just looked on the back of the unit and mine is the TCD-540040. I was looking in the system info and it was giving me the other numbers that I posted. So, one question answered :)
     
  9. rick123

    rick123 Member

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    Dec 8, 2004
    You can get a good set of instructions here customized to your unit and upgrade choices:

    tivo.upgrade-instructions.com
     
  10. Stoned Gecko

    Stoned Gecko First Timer

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    Mar 24, 2005
    Belmont, CA
    I'm really happy I found this thread. I bought a 540040 a coule of days ago, and after seeing that I wouldn't be able to get 40 hours out of it (basic quality just doesn't do it for me) I'm planning on an upgrade.
     
  11. Pisser

    Pisser New Member

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    Dec 8, 2004
    I used the hinsdale guide a few months ago on a 540. Took all of 20 minutes to do.

    In a nutshell:
    backup: mfsbackup -6so /mnt/dos/tivo.bak /dev/hdc
    restore and expand: mfsrestore -s 127 -xzpi /mnt/dos/tivo.bak /dev/hdc

    done, pretty damn simple....


    ****DO NOT USE THESE LINES AS THE BIBLE***** your settings may differ and there are a few things to do before and after, but these are the 2 main lines.
     
  12. darkcyber

    darkcyber New Member

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    Mar 16, 2005
    Ok, getting ready to download the files and had a question. When following the instructions it talks about downloading the right file for the new Series 2 Tivo units. Mine is the TCD540040.

    What exact file(s) do I need to make sure I have the correct stuff? On that page it's talking about LBA48 kernel, modified kernels...etc. Then it talks about download

    PTVupgrade LBA48 CD v4.01 FREE DOWNLOAD (default boot no byteswap)

    or

    PTVupgrade LBA48 CD v4.0 FREE DOWNLOAD (default boot byteswap).

    My current Tivo is a 40 hour unit and I'm going to replace that hd with a 200 gig hd...if that helps.

    Thanks!
     
  13. rick123

    rick123 Member

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    Dec 8, 2004
    That's a main reason why I recommend the weaknees site. They provide a link to the software iso file based on exactly how you want to do your upgrade.

    1. Go here: tivo.upgrade-instructions.com

    2. Select your model (series 2 standalone 540040)

    3. next page: complete upgrade choices

    4. next page: Click iso file download link

    That will get you the upgrade software you need. Just burn it as an iso (bootable), test it to make sure it boots, then you are ready to go.

    Good luck
     
  14. darkcyber

    darkcyber New Member

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    Mar 16, 2005
    Ok, went there downloaded the stuff and got into the boot disk and it told me to issue this command:

    mount /dev/hdW1 /mnt

    When I type that it says this

    mount: special device /dev/hdW1 does not exist

    Any clues?

    I just did exactly like rick 123 did:

    mfsbackup -Tao - /dev/hdc | mfsrestore -s 127 -xzpi - /dev/hdd

    and right now it's copying it. We'll see if it works or not
     
  15. rick123

    rick123 Member

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    Dec 8, 2004
    Hmm, I didn't have to do any mounting hard drive stuff in my upgrade...

    Maybe someone else knows what's up?
     
  16. darkcyber

    darkcyber New Member

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    Mar 16, 2005
    Well, I tried one of the sites and it listed that mount command. Then I came back and just did it just like you had posted. When I do it your way...I get this error at 26.13%

    26.13% finished and gave this error: Restore failed: Internal error 3
     
  17. rick123

    rick123 Member

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    Dec 8, 2004
  18. darkcyber

    darkcyber New Member

    153
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    Mar 16, 2005
    Question...where did you backup to? Your new replacement hd or another hd in your pc?
     
  19. rick123

    rick123 Member

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    Dec 8, 2004
    I did not back up, that's the thing about doing a drive replacement. Just keep your original drive as your backup, if anything happens, just put it back in. I believe you need a FAT partition to make a backup to a hard drive in your computer (that's all I know about making a backup) but IMO you really should disconnect any other hard drives in your computer to prevent a boot into windows xp (if that's what you have) which coulld cause problems.

    IMO there is nothing wrong with doing a backup, but it is just one more step that you are taking while your original (tivo) drive is connected therefore one more opportunity to screw up the original tivo drive.

    If you followed the steps in the "guide" I wrote, you would not of made a backup. Did you do some other typing other than

    mfsbackup -Tao - /dev/hdc | mfsrestore -s 127 -xzpi - /dev/hdd ?

    Also check if you have your optical drive jumpered and connected as primary slave and plugged into the primary IDE connector and your tivo jumpered as secondary master and replacement drive jumpered as secondary slave and connected to the secondary IDE channel?

    Hope this helps.
     
  20. azitnay

    azitnay Active Member

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    Jan 20, 2003
    Washington,...
    Good thread... I'm sure many people would rather hear a success story from a first-time upgrader than someone who's done it a million times.

    All the upgrade experts seem to have left the building around here :). I don't read TC much any more, but I'll do my best to answer some of the questions raised above:

    First, I recommend making (and testing) a backup, even if you're only copying from the old drive to a new drive and thus don't technically need it. Having a good backup ensures that you'll always have a way to restore your TiVo to working condition, regardless of hard disk failures (and yes, that old 40GB drive could certainly fail even though it's not in use; stranger things have happened). It does make the process a little more painful, since you need either a FAT partition or a Linux (typically ext2 or ext3) partition to back up to, and many people nowadays have XP boxes using NTFS, but since you have that shiny new drive that's eventually going to end up in your TiVo, you can format it as a FAT partition temporarily, and back up to it. Then, I'd recommend burning the image you back up onto a CD-R or CD-RW, and restoring from it onto the new drive to make sure the backup works before proceeding. After that, I typically store my backups both on the hard drive of my primary desktop computer, and on CD-R's as well.

    As to the person above who mentioned backup up using the command:

    mfsbackup -6so /mnt/dos/tivo.bak /dev/hdc

    You should really include -f 9999 before -6so in the line above. Without it, on some units you'll fail to back up everything you need; the first backup I ever made had this problem, and I was missing the menu backgrounds. This is also a good reason to test the backup you make before trusting that it's good.

    As for the question above about the line:

    mount /dev/hdW1 /mnt

    /dev/hdW1 isn't an actual device; that W is a placeholder for a lowercase letter, typically in the range a-d, depending on where the drive whose partition you're trying to mount is hooked up on the IDE controller. a is primary master, b is primary slave, c is secondary master, d is secondary slave. If you have more than one IDE controller, you can certainly have letters past d; the Linux box I use to perform most of my upgrades has an additional IDE controller, so I have /dev/hd[e-h] as well.

    I can't offer any more advice on the "Internal error 3" than Michael from weaknees posted in the thread linked to above, but certainly try what he suggests.

    Drew
     

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