Moving Home Movies from my Mac to my Series 3?

Discussion in 'TiVo Home Media Features & TiVoToGo' started by bareyb, Dec 6, 2008.

  1. bedelman

    bedelman Call me Bob

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    Crystal...

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    That's correct -- .tivo and MPEG-2 files will appear (.tivo files contain an MPEG-2 file inside the TiVo "wrapper"). Of course, you have to have the hidden video tab in TiVo Desktop for Mac OSX enabled.
     
  2. bareyb

    bareyb Under Maintenance TCF Club

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    Then what is the "Tivo Decoder" Apple Script for? :confused:
     
  3. bedelman

    bedelman Call me Bob

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    Crystal...
    In case you want to do something with the video inside the .tivo "wrapper". Plus the only thing you have on your Macintosh that can play a .tivo file is the Toast Video Player.

    TiVo Decoder and TiVo Desktop Manager (which uses TiVo Decode) is for people who don't want to have to purchase the Roxio solutions (either Toast 9 or Popcorn 3)
     
  4. bareyb

    bareyb Under Maintenance TCF Club

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    Ah I see... I think I got that confused with having to convert other video formats (such as MPEG 4) to MPEG2.

    Speaking of which... Is there a program to do that? I have Toast 9 but it doesn't appear to convert to Mpeg. Everything else under the sun. Just not the one I need. :p
     
  5. westside_guy

    westside_guy Annoyingly ephemeral

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    Okay, the error you get seems to be saying MacPorts didn't actually get installed.

    As to your other question - I use Fink rather than MacPorts; but they more or less work the same. So if ffmpeg needs lame (and it does, at least with the configuration you've chosen), lame should be installed automatically. However if you want to be sure, run "sudo port install lame" first - assuming of course that you get "port" (MacPort's main command) installed first.

    I wonder if it's just a path problem? try running the same "port" command, but use the full path like this:

    sudo /opt/local/bin/port install lame

    or

    sudo /opt/local/sbin/port install lame

    Since I don't use MacPorts, I'm not sure whether the "port" command is in the bin directory or the sbin directory.

    (On a tangent: this is the sort of thing that led me to using Fink rather than DarwinPorts/MacPorts. The Fink base system seems to be a bit more robust and user friendly. But either way, there's no getting away from the command line :p )
     
  6. bareyb

    bareyb Under Maintenance TCF Club

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    To tell you the truth, I think I'm gonna give up on this. It's just not worth the trouble. I appreciate the efforts of the developers who put this together, but I just can't hang with all installation hassles. Not to nitpick, but this thing needs a better installation program. All the great functionality in the world is worthless if people can't install it on their computers. I've been all over the net ten times today reading FAQS from ten different people and downloading 5 different software programs and utilities.I just can't devote any more time to this. It's a damn shame too because it looks like it might be really cool. I love a challenge and all, but I have small children and a wife who need me! I installed the free version of "Tivo To Go" from Tivo's website and I got it working in about ten minutes.

    It's okay, but I'm not crazy about the quality of my photos on my HD flatscreen. My buddy has an Apple TV and his photos look a lot better but of course on the Apple TV the photos are in HD so it's not a fair comparison. I tell you though, for $300.00 and 200 hours of video storage I'm half tempted to buy one of those myself. God that would make my life easier! My Movies in iMovie would already be done! Just plug in the thing and there they are. Tempting... Maybe Santa will get me one. :D
     
  7. westside_guy

    westside_guy Annoyingly ephemeral

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    I understand your decision - not everyone wants to fiddle around with their computers, or is comfortable doing so.

    As far as developing an integrated installer goes - you have to understand these sorts of projects are developed by people, in their own free time, simply to fill their own personal need (or sometimes just because they're curious to see if they can figure out how to do it). They decide to share them with the rest of us basically out of the goodness of their hearts. Developing an all-encompassing installation package would be a lot of work for them with no personal advantage - so there's little incentive to do it.
     
  8. bareyb

    bareyb Under Maintenance TCF Club

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    Dang. You quoted me before I could edit my post. Sorry about the mini rant. I was feeling pretty frustrated. As you can see I softened things quite a bit. I appreciate what you mean about people doing this out of the kindness of their hearts. It's just a damn shame it's in a form that is all but unusable for most people who would need it. But as you say, the people who put their time into this don't really care if regular folks can use their software or not. The Tivo software works well enough for my purposes and I won't have to worry about keeping all those freeware products up to date and working.

    Thank you for taking the time. I do love a challenge and it started out being fun. Once I saw how many different people were working on this and all the problems people are having, it began to lose it's fun factor. I'm pretty happy with the Tivo software for now and I have a feeling Santa is going to bring us an Apple TV for Christmas. ;)
     
  9. moyekj

    moyekj Well-Known Member

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    To be fair pyTivo has a huge user base who have no problems/issues with it and got it installed very easily, and in fact it works better than Tivo's own Tivo Desktop software most of the time. It does take some effort to get installed, especially on non-Windows platforms, but if you choose the Macintosh route over Windows then you have to be prepared and willing to go above and beyond to get a lot of software not specifically designed for Macs up and running.
     
  10. bareyb

    bareyb Under Maintenance TCF Club

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    I think you are probably right about that. Most of the more involved stuff I've done with the TiVo's have been on my wife's PC. I've upgraded my hard drives on both Tivos and the software was only available for Windows. Of course, it has an installer so it was a piece of cake to install. The new Mac that's coming will (finally) be one of the Intel based units and I plan to run Windows on it as well as Mac OS. Maybe I can play around with it some more then. At least then if something goes too awry I can just reinstall the software. I can't risk that on my Mac. I do think it's amazing some of the stuff you guys come up with. It just sucks that it has to be so difficult to use. It sounds like the Windows stuff works a little better. Maybe by then you will write a Windows installer program so regular people like me can install it. :D
     
  11. rn701

    rn701 New Member

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    Can't you just output your movies in .mov or .mp4, publish them in Tivo Desktop, and then see them in your "Now Playing" list on the Tivo?

    Works on Windows with Tivo Desktop version 2.6.

    (ETA: Oh, I see the Mac version maybe doesn't have this feature? Bummer.)
     
  12. bareyb

    bareyb Under Maintenance TCF Club

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    If only that were true. But I think you are mistaken. Current TiVo boxes can only read Mpegs. Unless you are saying that the Windows version of Desktop can do conversions?
     
  13. bareyb

    bareyb Under Maintenance TCF Club

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    LOL! Why didn't anyone tell me? :D


    Oh my god. I guess I should have looked into the PC side of things a little better! What the blue blazes! The PC version DOES do conversions! Holy Crap! Thank you rn701! As I said before I have an Intel Mac coming Tuesday which I plan to load Vista on. I've been using Windows utilities to upgrade my TiVos. Maybe this might be a good work around. The only downside I can see is that I'd have to have a way to access all my videos from Windows and Mac. I guess If I keep them on a separate drive I'll be okay. Hmmmm... This just might be the way to go... :)
     
  14. westside_guy

    westside_guy Annoyingly ephemeral

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    If you use VMware or Parallels to run Windows in a virtual machine, rather than rebooting to run Windows (rather than using Bootcamp, in other words) - You can use shared folders. Both VMware and Parallels will let you share any/all of your Mac folders with your Windows virtual machine.

    Parallels and VMware work quite well, and are very painless to install.

    The only good reason (in my opinion) to actually use Bootcamp to run Windows is if you are a gamer. Virtualization of advanced graphics (specifically 3D shaders in Direct X) is not to the same level of sophistication that virtualization of the CPU is - they are doing a pretty good job of it, but it's simply not "perfect" yet. Intel's CPU's are designed with virtualization in mind - so running Windows inside of a virtual machine will basically be just as speedy as if you reboot and run it natively (on a computer made in the last couple of years, anyway - and on a non-Core2Duo Intel Mac it'll still be speedy).
     
  15. bareyb

    bareyb Under Maintenance TCF Club

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    That sounds great. Man things have improved lately. I used to use Windows emulators and they barely worked at all. Would you happen to know, if I'm not on the "Windows Side" (let's say I'm working on the Macintosh part of VMware) will the "TiVo To Go" functionality still work or does it only work if you are actively using Windows?
     
  16. westside_guy

    westside_guy Annoyingly ephemeral

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    The problem in the past was that Macs used a different processor - so EVERY Intel processor command had to be interpreted into the equivalent code for the G3/G4/G5 processor. This was SLOW, as you might imagine. It's a much faster process now that Windows and OS X can both run natively on Intel processors. And for the past couple of years, Intel has built in some pretty sophisticated support for virtualization right into their processors, so VMware or Parallels (to save typing I'm just going to say "VMware" from now on) can simply pass a lot of the commands straight to the processor without having to worry about the extremely low-level systems stuff.

    But back to your question. :D As long as VMware is actually running, and Tivo To Go is running inside of Windows - it should continue to work, even if you're browsing the web using Safari or using iMovie. If you close down VMware, then Windows will not be running which means Tivo To Go won't be running.

    The main thing to remember is this - like any program, VMware needs memory. Because an actual operating system is running inside of it, VMware needs a hefty chunk of memory. This means that the more memory you give VMware, the less that's available for other programs - but this is true of any software package, not just VMware. VMware lets you adjust how much memory is dedicated to it, so you can tweak it to see what works best. I don't know what Windows Tivo To Go wants/needs, so what I'm about to say might not be enough for your case - but I find VMware (w/ Windows XP) is reasonably happy with 512MB of RAM. My Mac has 2GB overall. When I've given VMware a bigger chunk of my total RAM than that, it occasionally can make certain other Mac programs a bit sluggish. If you're one of these Mac people that never actually quits any program (your dock is full of those little white triangles), then you may see this a bit. Me, when I'm done with a program I generally like to "quit" it anyway. :p
     
  17. westside_guy

    westside_guy Annoyingly ephemeral

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    To be fair, I just want to point out that most of the "problems people are having" aren't due to the programs themselves. The underlying issue is that these programs assume a level of computer knowledge that many people simply do not have. For a person that is comfortable with the command line, as I am, getting pyTivo running was a matter of 5-10 minutes.

    That's one of the great things about Mac, now that (as of OS X) it's based on Unix. Long-term Mac users can happily continue to use them like they always did, as if the Unix-y stuff doesn't even exist. New Mac users and Windows converts can do the same. But there's this whole other world of Unix under there as well, which makes the Mac a great platform for the Unix geek too.

    As an aside: I was a DOS/Windows user (and programmer) for a lot of years before I switched (out of frustration!) to Linux - and from there to OS X.
     
  18. bedelman

    bedelman Call me Bob

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    Crystal...
    For TiVo Desktop for Windows to do the on-the-fly conversions I think you do need to purchase the "plus" key from TiVo for $25. BTW -- I switched from Parallels over to VMware's Fusion. It can also work with your BootCamp partition so that you can either dual boot if you need performance -- or just use Fusion without rebooting.

    I also have 4GB of RAM in the MacBook Pro. My wife's MacBook Pro can only go to 2GB -- and I wouldn't want to have any less than that.

    - Bob
     
  19. bareyb

    bareyb Under Maintenance TCF Club

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    You guys are great to help me like this. Thank yo so much. I'm very excited about getting my new Mac now. I mean I was already, but VMware sounds absolutely bitchen. Do people still say that? :D

    I ordered a "Standard" configured Dual Quad 2.8 Ghz Mac Pro with 2 Gigs of RAM (2 X 1 Gig) and I just ordered up 6 more 1 Gig Sticks from OWC. So I will have a Total of 8 Gigs. It's been a few years since I got my head into the insides of computers. I used to be huge OS 9 geek. OSX is so much better, but I will admit, once the kids came (8 years ago for the first one) I haven't had much time to play with it. The more I learn, the more impressed I am. Boy, I'm sure glad I decided to load it up with RAM. A PAIR of 1 Gig sticks is only $78.00 now. Unbelievable. I used to do music editing, and my first "gigantor" 4 Gig Hard Drive from APS cost me $2000.00. :p
     
  20. bedelman

    bedelman Call me Bob

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    Crystal...
    My very first hard drive was a whopping 5MB in size and cost about $1,200. It was from a company named "Davong" and that price included the external enclosure and the interface card. I had the raw drive itself (with a 1982 manufacture date) in my office in New York where it was used as a door stop.
     

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