Moca with Tivo Bolt+ and Tuning adapter

Discussion in 'TiVo Help Center' started by Jrr6415sun, Jan 27, 2018.

  1. Jrr6415sun

    Jrr6415sun Member

    198
    9
    Mar 31, 2006

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    How should I do the wiring for a MoCA with a tuning adapter?

    [​IMG]

    this is how I currently have my MoCa network setup. Where do I add in the tuning adapter?

    [​IMG]
    this is the official tivo support on how to add the tuning adapter. I am assuming I would just combine the two images and have the splitter into a splitter? Or can I use a 3 way splitter?
     
  2. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

    16,360
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    Nov 25, 2003
    A 3-way splitter would be cleanest, but, yes, inserting a 2-way to add another split would work.

    You may also need to install a MoCA filter on the input of the tuning adapter to protect it from interference due to the MoCA signals.
     
  3. Jrr6415sun

    Jrr6415sun Member

    198
    9
    Mar 31, 2006
    would a 3-way splitter degrade the signal at all? (slow my internet?) The current 3 way splitter I have is 5-1000Mhz -140db EMI ISOLATION Is this good enough or should I get a different one?

    The 3 outlets on the splitter are -3.5dB -7.0dB and -7.0dB. Should I put the cable going to the modem at the -3.5dB?
     
  4. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

    16,360
    3,076
    Nov 25, 2003
    Which device should be connected to the low-loss port of an unbalanced 3-way like you have would depend on which device is nearest the lower edge of its acceptable signal window. It's possible you may want the DVR connected to the low-loss output. You can check the modem's and DVR's signal levels to estimate which device might be better served by the lower attenuation.

    The standard 1GHz cable splitter will likely work fine, but a "designed for MoCA" splitter (e.g.) would be preferable if you opt to replace the splitter -- either due to MoCA performance concerns or to switch to a balanced 3-way splitter.

    p.s. An unbalanced 3-way splitter is effectively the same as cascading a couple 2-way splitters, which is why one output port has the same loss as a 2-way splitter, while the remaining ports' loss value is the sum of two 2-ways. A balanced 3-way splitter evenly spreads the loss across all 3 ports, usually around 5.5 dB per port.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2018

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