MOCA adapters, Tivo Roamio, and Google WiFi

Discussion in 'TiVo Help Center' started by jaj2276, Jan 9, 2019.

  1. kpeters59

    kpeters59 Well-Known Member

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    And now, after looking more closely, I see that those Signal Strengths are actually ~-10 dB, which is below acceptable levels...so disregard the Attenuator idea...you need more power!

    -KP
     
  2. ThAbtO

    ThAbtO TiVoholic by the bay

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    Ask Tim Taylor!
     
  3. kpeters59

    kpeters59 Well-Known Member

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    I was using my Scotty accent!

    -KP
     
  4. ThAbtO

    ThAbtO TiVoholic by the bay

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    An -3dB attenuator would bring the SNR down a notch. Should help with pixelations. Do not see it as a weak signal though.
     
  5. kpeters59

    kpeters59 Well-Known Member

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    Anything below -7 dB wouldn't pass Comcast 'Premise Health Test' and the Tech wouldn't be able to close his ticket.

    -KP
     
  6. jaj2276

    jaj2276 Member

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    I looked at the signals before posting them and saw that there were some borderline values. Some were even at levels where it "shouldn't work." I can't say what they were with the Moca 1.1 adapters but at least with the Moca 2.0 adapters, the modem delivers really good performance (170mbps down, 10mbps up) as long as it's connected. Obviously it losing connection could be due to the poor signals and now I to find out what could be causing the poor signals. In the previous setup with the Tivo Roamio acting as the MoCA bridge and Actiontec 1.1 adapters, the modem never had this issue. So the signal is poor due to the fact the adapters are 2.0 instead of 1.0 or there's an adapter inline with the coax going to the modem.

    The other weird thing (to me) is that regardless of how long the modem has been offline (5 minutes or 5 hours), as soon as I pull the power and plug it back in, the modem is able to connect. Can't understand why the modem wouldn't be able to repair itself if it can immediately connect once I make it forget that it was in an unconnected state in the first place.
     
  7. jaj2276

    jaj2276 Member

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    I received a PoE filter for each of my 2.0 MoCA adapters so I have a few spare ones lying around. I'll screw one in to the coax connector on the modem and then attach the coax to that filter. Just to make sure, I already have a PoE on the cable outside before it gets split and sent to different parts of the house. Having multiple ones won't cause any issues? If I understand it correctly, the PoE filter will make sure my MoCA signals stay inside my house and then the PoE signal that I'm going to add to the cable modem will make sure the MoCA signals don't make it to the modem?
     
  8. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    Correct.

    Though the "PoE" MoCA filter (i.e. the MoCA filter installed at your cable point-of-entry, or "PoE") also improves MoCA network performance by more efficiently reflecting MoCA signals back onto the home coax plant, lessening node-to-node attenuation. More on "PoE" MoCA filters >here<.
     
  9. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    Because software bugs are a thing?

    Just keep in mind the possibility that the linked thread stating that the MB8600 has an issue may not be pure conjecture.
     
  10. jaj2276

    jaj2276 Member

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    PoE filter on the coax input port of the modem seems to have fixed the modem disconnecting. I read all the responses here about download pwr and snr as well as upload pwr and seems like my real issues it that all 4 of my upstream channels have pwr readings of 59+.

    I'm going to take my laptop and cable modem and start from where the cable comes in from the ground to determine where the bad cable/connection/splitter might be.

    Other than that, appreciate everyone taking a look!
     
    krkaufman likes this.
  11. jaj2276

    jaj2276 Member

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    Last post on this topic, just in case it helps someone else get over the hump on trying to improve their internet speeds.

    Initial readings when I had my modem connected via a 3-way splitter then a 2-way splitter then another 2-way splitter (w/ a MoCA adapter inserted between the last 2-way and the cable modem) were roughly -11 down power, 39 down snr, and 59 up power. The upstream 59 power readings suggested there were issues on my line somewhere and were likely why the modem would lose connectivity (most sites said that it wouldn't even work at greater than 57). My speeds were great even with these bad upstream readings (180mbps down, 10mpbs up).

    I took my laptop, a cable modem, and a coax with a female-to-female adapter for ease of testing outside to where the coax comes to my house from the utility pole.

    -- First test was cable from pole going in to cable modem. +7 downstream power, 41 downstream snr, +40 upstream power. Obviously this really improved my upstream power numbers.
    -- Next I tested with a PoE filter inline of the pole coax and cable modem. I wanted to test that the PoE filter wasn't bad or screwing something up. Readings were similar except maybe a small downtick in downstream power numbers (+5, +6).
    -- Next I added in my coax testing cable with female-to-female adapter (so it went pole coax -> PoE -> female-to-female adapter -> testing coax -> modem). I did this just to make sure my testing coax cable was "good." This had identical numbers, so far so good.
    -- Added in the 3-way splitter (pole coax -> PoE filter -> 3-way splitter -> coax test cable -> modem). First test was the right drop. The signals changed a bit to +1 to +3 on downstream power, 39-41 downstream snr, and +46 upstream power. Downstream power decreased a bit, SNR stayed the same, and upstream power increased but still at good levels.
    -- Tested the 2nd (middle) drop. Results same as the first drop.
    -- Tested the 3rd (left) drop. Of course I didn't write these levels down because of subsequent actions but they were quite a bit worse. The upstream #s were mid 50s, the ds power was in the low negatives but the SNR stayed at 39. So something seemed weird about this drop.
    -- Retested all 3 drops and came up with the same readings. The left drop was worse than the middle and right drops. And guess where the cable modem was connected to while in the house? That's correct, the left drop!
    -- This was a brand new splitter (I had replaced them back in November in prep for getting the MoCA 2.0 adapters) so I didn't think this would be the issue. Fortunately (or maybe unfortunately if the first one is any indication) I had to buy 2 of these so I had a spare one still sitting in the package. I replaced the 3-way and confirmed that all 3 drops had the same readings as the good 2 drops (right and middle) from the original 3-way splitter (+1 to +3 on downstream power, 39-41 SNR, and +46 on upstream power).
    -- Assuming I got lucky and found the problem relatively early in the line, I immediately went back inside and hooked up the modem to my Google WiFi/MoCA setup. The readings were worse (due to the cable length and the 2 additional 2-way splitters). However the #s were better once I replaced that 3-way. I was getting -9 to -11 downstream power, 38-40 downstream snr, and 53-55 upstream power. The upstream numbers, while not great, were much better and at least borderline acceptable.

    As I begun to think about it, I realized that since my Tivo Roamio wasn't acting as the MoCA bridge anymore, I didn't need the cable modem by the Roamio. Thinking about the other 2 drops, one had a coax run longer than the Tivo Roamio run. It also had a splitter in its run as it served 2 bedrooms. I didn't really want a cable modem in either of those 2 bedrooms.

    However the other drop literally had a coax run of about 5 feet and then terminated in the wall down in our den. A perfect place for a cable modem (and where a MoCA 2.0 adapter, Google WiFi point, and switch already sat). So after a bit work reconfiguring the WiFi points, etc., I settled on this final resting place with the final values:

    Downstream Power: -0.9 to +1.0
    Downstream SNR: 40.5 to 41.4
    Upstream Power: 46.8

    Speeds have remained the same with this new modem location but hopefully I will have improved my cable modem reliability.

    Thanks again to everyone!
     
    krkaufman and kpeters59 like this.
  12. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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