MM1000 MoCa Runs Slow

Discussion in 'TiVo Help Center' started by morens, Oct 24, 2019.

  1. morens

    morens New Member

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    Oct 24, 2019

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    I am on Comcast cable internet. I have an MM1000 connected to the cable modem and a remote MM1000 across the house. My laptop connected directly to the modem runs consistently at 170 Mbps. The same laptop connected to the remote MM1000 runs consistently at 70 Mbps. My house has 5 coax drops. One drop to the modem and four drops to TV's in different rooms. The Comcast line comes in to their powered amplifier/splitter. The remote MM1000 works, it is just slower. Is this normal for the coax network I described, or can anything be done to increase the speed? Thanks to all for any insights.
     
  2. kpeters59

    kpeters59 Well-Known Member

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    Why not try the Built-In MoCA in the Comcast Router?

    -KP
     
  3. morens

    morens New Member

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    We had Comcast a couple of years ago for a few years then switched to AT&T/DirecTV. On the first go-around with Comcast, if I remember correctly, I tried that and couldn't get it to work. I talked to Motorola and they advised to get a second MM1000 and connect it to the Modem as I have now. I can't remember the details from a couple of years ago as to why the internal MoCa wouldn't work. Another interesting fact; with DirecTV, using their devices for ethernet over coax, I experienced no loss whatsoever to my remote drop. Of course, the AT&T internet maxes out at 50 Mbps, but I got the exact same speed at my remote end.
     
  4. kpeters59

    kpeters59 Well-Known Member

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    So you don't have a Comcast modem?

    I use the MoCA built in to the Comcast Modem regularly. It works fine.

    Maybe hook it up again so you can at least read the MoCA Signal Levels off the Modem?

    I think the MM1000's have a gui where you can get level info, too, but I don't know it's login info.

    -KP
     
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  5. morens

    morens New Member

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    Sorry for the confusion with my story. Yes, I am back with Comcast now as initially described. I dug out the MM1000's to connect again. I will give it a try again to turn on the MoCa in the Comcast modem. It may be 2 or 3 days before I can spend the time again, but I will get back to this thread when I do. Thanks for the help!

    P.S. I am using the Comcast provided modem.
     
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  6. snerd

    snerd Well-Known Member

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    If you don't have a MoCA PoE filter, adding one might improve your bandwidth.
     
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  7. morens

    morens New Member

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    That's also next on my list. Thanks!
     
  8. compnurd

    compnurd Well-Known Member

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    Unless every link in your MOCA chain is 2.0 your not going to see the speeds of the MM1000
     
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  9. morens

    morens New Member

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    Oct 24, 2019
    I managed to get a little time just now and tried enabling the Comcast internal MoCA. PRESTO, BINGO! Thank you very much for pointing me back in that direction. I disconnected the MM1000 on the modem end and turned on the internal MoCA. As mentioned above, the laptop at the modem gets 170 Mbps and WAS getting around 70 at the remote end. Well now, it is also screaming on the remote MM1000 at 170! That also caused me to remember the specific reason I had previously with the internal MoCA not working. I had enabled it and then connected my single MM1000 at the remote, but it wouldn't work. That's when I called Motorola. He advised me to buy a second MM1000 and connect it at the modem. I did that, and it STILL wouldn't work. I called Motorola back and he asked me how I had them connected. Long story short, I found out I needed a splitter at the remote end. After that, since it worked, albeit slow, I never considered going back to the internal modem MoCA!

    While we're conversing (I really appreciate your input into this entire matter), I have a tangential question to this remote end of the network. I have a 2 or 3 year old Belkin router connected to the remote MM1000. The laptop gets it's 170 Mbps when plugged into this router. Also, the usual devices are connected i.e. DVD player, Amazon Fire Stick etc. The tangential question concerns the WiFi speed from this router. First, my iPhone WAS getting around 170 Mbps (Oh, I forgot to mention that I have a desktop at the modem location. The Comcast line is rated at 200 Mbps. The desktop flies at 230-240 Mbps). The iPhone is now screaming on WiFi at that remote location at 230-240 as it does on the Comcast internal WiFi. The actual question involves an older HP desktop (around 2012) that I keep across that remote room. It has a USB WiFi adapter. Its speed is all over the place. The laptop may vary a little on its internal WiFi, but not like the HP. The HP will swing anywhere from 35 to 65. The laptop will run more consistently around 50 to 60. This is no change from when I was using the MM1000 connected to the modem. The laptop is probably not quite as old as the HP.

    I have tried two different USB adapters in the HP, but to no avail. Also, 2.4 GHz seems to be better than the 5 GHz is, although my recollection is that when I first put the HP in this room, it ran better on the 5 GHz from the WiFi. At first I thought it was something with the WiFi in the Belkin router, but seeing the iPhone fly now (on 5) , maybe I need a different type of USB WiFi adapter in the HP. My last step would be to run a LAN cable. Any thoughts? Thanks again for any help.

    Be well!
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2019
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  10. morens

    morens New Member

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    I was only using two MM1000 units. One at the modem and the other at a single remote end. I resolved the issue based on the suggestion to try the internal MoCA in the modem and remove the MM1000 at the modem. See my additional response. Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2019
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  11. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    Switching to the internal MoCA of the Comcast gateway should not have been necessary and may result in lesser bandwidth between locations (though arguably sufficient).

    What is the model number of your Comcast gateway?

    The MM1000 is a bonded MoCA 2.0 adapter, capable of up to 800 Mbps throughput with another like node (1 Gpbs in a 2 node-only setup). So, your max throughput to the remote location will depend on the MoCA spec supported by your Comcast gateway.

    MoCA 1.1 ... 150-170 Mbps
    Standard MoCA 2.0 ... 400 Mbps
    Bonded MoCA 2.0 ... 800 Mbps

    As you can see, if using a MoCA 2.0 connection, any device networked via the remote location should have available throughput of 400 Mbps, and certainly up to your current download rate of 230-240 Mbps (typical Comcast 10% overprovision of spec’d rate). Of course, if you want to test the actual throughput over the MoCA connection, avoiding the limit imposed by your Internet connection, you’ll want to use iPerf, LAN Speed Test, or some other utility on a pair of computers wired to either side of the link.
     
  12. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    One concern, if the laptop is to be used as a test device, would be why the laptop is failing to hit the maximum download rate, like the desktop, when directly connected to the gateway.
     
  13. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    Can you report the model number of this amp? And, for bonus points, the ports to which the various coax runs connect?
     
  14. fcfc2

    fcfc2 Well-Known Member

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    Without some clarification, this information is incorrect. So long as the leg with the MM1000 is connecting to the leg with another MM1000, it should be capable of using the bonded MoCA 2.0 speeds. The only exception to this is when using a WCB3000N on the same MoCA network, this will bring the entire network down to the MoCA 1.1 speeds.
     
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  15. morens

    morens New Member

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    Thanks for the info. The Comcast Gateway is an Arris TG1682G. I agree with you. I don't understand the severely reduced throughput using the MM1000 at the gateway end of it. I actually sent an email to Motorola via their website last Thursday night, but don't have a reply from them yet. It may be strange, but when I removed the MM1000 at the gateway end of it and turned on the internal MoCA in the gateway, it shocked the heck out of me when I got full speed at the remote MM1000. I'll keep you posted as to Motorola's answer.
     
  16. morens

    morens New Member

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    Absolutely understand about using a laptop as a test device. But I wasn't going to fidgit with disconnecting my desktop which is installed in a computer desk with hutch, big heavy etc. :blush:
     
  17. morens

    morens New Member

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    If you're referring to the Comcast amplifier/splitter that their POE cable comes to, I really don't feel like climbing up a ladder right now to get into their junction box. But, basically, it's a moot point now since enabling the internal MoCA in the gateway fixed the problem. Apparently, my older laptop is only capable of 170 since that's what it gets at the direct gateway connection. But I mentioned above that my iPhone, which gets 230 at the internal WiFi at the gateway, AND gets 230 on my remote router WiFi, I am convinced I am getting maximum throughput over the coax with MoCA.

    P.S. The Comcast supplied amp/splitter, if I recall when watching him install it, has an input with 8 output ports. So 5 are in use, and the other 3 are terminated.
     
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  18. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    Using a laptop isn’t a concern; your reported results are:
    Why is your laptop not reporting the same throughput as the desktop when directly wired to the gateway?

    p.s. Just saw this...
    That’s an odd result, but if you’re OK with it...
     
  19. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    This model supports standard MoCA 2.0, so a max throughput of up to 400 Mbps when communicating with another MoCA 2.0 node (assuming a 3+ node setup).
     
  20. morens

    morens New Member

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    Oct 24, 2019
    One more factoid if you're interested; I just fixed my WiFi problem at the remote end. My older HP desktop has a USB 2.0 WiFi adaptor and the best I could get out of it has been 40 to 50, occasionally peaking at 60, sometimes dropping to 20-30. I was Googling for answers and found that changing the channel number of either the 2.4 or 5.0 from the default "Auto" on both to something fixed, fixed that problem. On the 2.4, I went to channel 11 and get 90. and on the 5.0 I changed it to 40 and now get over 200. In short, I am now a happy camper! Thanks for your interest and assistance!

    P.S. I continued to test my iPhone while making these WiFi changes, and happy to report that the phone is still getting 230 on the 5.0!
    You know, I guess it is an odd result. I would think that the Ethernet card would be a gigabit card and should run the same speed as the desktop connected to the Comcast modem. I will probably look into that.
     
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