May be a dumb question about Ethernet vs. Wireless

Discussion in 'TiVo Premiere DVRs' started by ThePhantomsGirl, Nov 25, 2011.

  1. ThePhantomsGirl

    ThePhantomsGirl Member

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    I will apologize in advance if this is one of those "dumb" questions.

    I am upgrading to a Premiere. I presently have a S2 with a Tivo brand wireless G adapter.

    However, my router is now in the same room and is only maybe about 10 to 12 feet away from the Tivo.

    Would it be better (and faster) for me to get a longer Ethernet cable and directly link to the router? I have a LinkSys WRT300N router and it has hook-ups for more than one Ethernet cable.

    I will not be running additional Tivos at this time, but I will want to use Netflix, Amazon on Demand, etc.

    I guess my confusion comes from the fact that Netflix and Amazon stream to the Tivo. But I can use either on my computer ... so it would seem to me that I don't really need a wireless adapter?

    My phone is through Comcast, so I don't have a separate phone line, but from what I'm reading the Premier doesn't link that way anyway?
     
  2. jcthorne

    jcthorne Well-Known Member

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    Yes, the wired connection will provide a more reliable and faster connection for your new Tivo Premiere. Wired is the preferred connetion type whenever possible.

    The Premiere does not use a phone connection.
     
  3. worachj

    worachj Well-Known Member

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  4. kturcotte

    kturcotte Active Member

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    You CAN get a phone adapter, but you WON'T be using Netflix or Amazon, or using the HDUI.
    As others have stated, if you can do wired, DO IT!!
     
  5. ThePhantomsGirl

    ThePhantomsGirl Member

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    Thanks! I researched a little more and it looks like the best way to go. Don't know why I was confused about whether streaming would work but I guess I'm so used to using wireless I didn't know any other way. It should be easy and reasonably inexpensive to get a longer Ethernet cable since it's not all that far.
     
  6. aadam101

    aadam101 Tell me a joke

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    Wireless would work fine if the router is only 10-12 feet away.
     
  7. aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    Wireless will work perfectly fine for Netflix, Amazon, Hulu+ etc. Those are low bitrate streaming services. Wireless G can handle that with plenty of speed to spare. As long as the Access Point isn't saturated with devices and you have good signal strength streaming those services on wireless, from a user perspective, will be the same as wired.

    In other words if your wireless network is setup properly(most aren't) it will be fine. Most people erroneously only use one Access Point for their entire house and have too many devices connected to it. And also might not have the channels setup properly for what is being used in their area. All those things can cause issues.
     
  8. ltxi

    ltxi New Member

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    Not a dumb question. Always hardwire if it's an option. Especially if you're limited to wireless G.
     
  9. unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    Actually, the TiVo brand wireless G adapter, which has its own microprocessor built in to it to do in hardware what would otherwise have to be done in software by the TiVo's processor, is not a bad alternative to a wired connection for an S2, since it relieves the TiVo of some of what it would have to do computationally if you use its Ethernet jack.

    If you have an S2 with an Ethernet jack it's a dual tuner, often known as the S2 DT.

    I've got two of them. One connects to my router via Ethernet cable and the other connects via the wireless adapter, so I have experience with both.

    Going from the wireless one in another room to the router and back to a wireless-equipped computer in that same room seems to be just as fast as going from the wired TiVo over about 5 feet of Ethernet cable to the router and another 5 feet of cable to another similarly powered computer.

    What you should do, wired or wireless, is give the TiVo(s) a fixed IP address, rather than letting them rely on DHCP.
     
  10. aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    Why give it a fixed IP address? There is nothing wrong with giving it a fixed IP address, but it will work exactly the same with or without a static IP address. It will make no difference in speed.
     
  11. unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    Without a fixed address it has to negotiate DHCP with the router, which is one more thing that can possibly go wrong.

    Since it's not necessary to let it do DHCP (you aren't going to be taking it to Starbucks like it was a laptop), why give DHCP a chance to go wrong?
     
  12. zentec

    zentec New Member

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    Because there's a better chance of entering the wrong information manually than a DHCP failure. You know, IP address conflicts, wrong netmasks and gateways.

    Not everyone is a CCNA.
     
  13. unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    Well, I'm certainly not.

    Is that one of those Novell certifications that were a big deal back in the '90s?
     
  14. aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    I can't say I've ever had any issues with DHCP. I ran a DHCP server for my home network in the late 90's and early 2000s and then when routers got gigabit ports I switched to those. I've never had an issue with any of them.
    I use DHCP reservations for the devices I need to have a static IP and it has always worked without any issue.
     
  15. whompus60

    whompus60 Member

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    I have a question for you guys that use wired connection (as I do) that have already got the 14.9 update. Does the update speed up the transfer to and from each box and to and from computer? I would think if this new update truly enables the second core of the processor it would. It seems to me the processor has been the bottleneck to this point.
     
  16. dianebrat

    dianebrat wait.. I did what? TCF Club

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    Sorry I'm just not seeing DHCP being an issue out there in the real world, 99% of all homes are running it and most businesses use it, sending a Tivo user down that path seems like a complete waste of everyone's time, normal folks don't need to even know static IPs exist, of course this is IMNSHO.
     
  17. aadam101

    aadam101 Tell me a joke

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    I don't know much about networking. I do know that my Tivo's were having a hell of a time on my MoCa network until I gave them static IP's. I have no idea why it was a problem but my connection issues stopped once they had a static IP.
     
  18. lillevig

    lillevig Cold in East Iowa

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    It's the other 1 percent that drives you crazy. My HD refused to work when set to DHCP, unlike the S1, S2, and Premiere units I've tried. Setting static IP addresses is not difficult and, personally, I prefer doing it for the various devices I have around the house. Let's me think I'm in control.
     
  19. aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    Transfer speed has been the same for me. 80mb/s to 90mb/s.
    And transfers to TiVo Desktop for me are still around 70mb/s.
     
  20. Jonathan_S

    Jonathan_S Well-Known Member

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    Oddly lately I've actually had a DHCP problem with the xbox 360; but that mostly a implementation issue with that device. (Never really had any issues with it before)

    If something interupts the 360's network connection briefly it'll dump the DHCP assigned IP in favor of a 169.x.x.x address, but won't check again for a valid address from DHCP unless you unplug the ethernet cable for a short while or you exit the game and go to the console's network setup.

    (Asking it to reconnect to Microsoft's online service apparently doesn't cause it to attempt to aquire a valid address from the DHCP server, even when it has an autogenerated 169.x.x.x address :rolleyes:)
     

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