Love Tivo but am Moving to a building that does not have Cable--Any recomendations?

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by omelet1978, Nov 15, 2019.

  1. omelet1978

    omelet1978 Active Member

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    Hi,

    I have a Tivo Bolt 3TB with lifetime and a Tivo Mini Vox with both on TE3. I've got a pretty large and expanding movie collection, so that being said it's a major bummer to realize the place I'm moving does not have Cable but instead uses DirecTV. I don't watch much live tv at this point (mostly movies) so that being said I'm just weighing my options:

    1. Get a Roku or Apple Tv and then use YouTube TV which is well reviewed and costs $50 a month. Can't download shows to my computer using PyTivo and you lose your recordings after 9 months.

    2. Sell the Tivo Bolt 3tb and then just cut the cord and use Netflix, Hulu, Disney+, etc...on an Apple Tv or Roku.

    3. Use the Tivo Bolt 3tb as a streaming box. Keep the couple hundred movies and then use it for online streaming with Hulu and Netflix. The apps are not as updated as Roku BUT I've got the Tivo Slide Remote already and to me the apps are good enough.

    4. Get an OTA Tivo Edge- Putting this as my last choice since I'm pretty skeptical of the channels and video quality with an OTA antenna.

    Any inputs would be appreciated.
     
  2. OrangeCrush

    OrangeCrush Active Member

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    Transfer off what you want to keep & sell it. 'Tis the season for great deals on USB hard drives if you're short on space. This is also a great time to pick up whatever streaming devices you care to use. I suggest Apple TVs, Fire Stick 4ks or NVidia shields. Rokus are simpler but have some annoying limitations if you want to add an OTA DVR later.

    If you want to try OTA at some point, run a report for the new building to get an idea of what your reception situation will be like: RabbitEars.Info If you have good signal, OTA picture quality is better than cable. If you have poor signal, you get nothing or it just glitches & stutters. There's no "snow" like in the analog era. You can always test your actual reception with a $25 antenna (keep the receipt) before you commit more money to an OTA DVR solution. If that's solid, then you can start looking in to a Channels DVR, Tablo or Recast.

    There's really no reason to keep the Bolt & Mini. You'll do much better selling them & reinvesting the proceeds in a more competent streaming platform.
     
    NashGuy, Aaron Malloy and unclehonkey like this.
  3. Adam C.

    Adam C. Active Member

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    Antennas are generally pretty cheap. Buy one and plug it into your TV to test out what quality reception you get. Don't buy a Tivo OTA and then realize you can't get reception. Test it out on the TV first and if it doesn't work out for you, you can always return the antenna.
     
    jrtroo and Mikeguy like this.
  4. unclehonkey

    unclehonkey Well-Known Member

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    it depends on how the cable company gets the signal and how many subchannels are on the OTA station. As example my market (Mankato, MN) is a 1 station market. KEYC 12-1 CBS and 12-2 FOX. The OTA signal of FOX is really mushy and pixelated due to bandwidth issues. The old owner (United Communications) got stuck with a contract where CBS requires alot more bandwidth than the FOX does. CBS gets between 10-12 Mbps (higher for sports) and FOX gets between 6-8 Mbps. Cable gets a fibre feed of both stations of 15 Mbps pere the engineer at KEYC
    I encode a 15Mbps CBR instance of CBS, and a 15Mbps CBR instance of FOX, for all the MVPDs who choose to take it. (This, as opposed to the VBR/statmux arrangement for OTA, which leaves FOX with significantly less bandwidth.)
    I understand our new owners may be able to loosen the restrictions that have historically prevented me from giving FOX more OTA bandwidth.


    If the cable company gets the signal OTA instead of fibre then the signal is the same or possibly worse (depending on how many stations cable crams in one transponder)
     
    OrangeCrush and dishrich like this.
  5. trip1eX

    trip1eX imo, afaik, feels like to me, *exceptions, ~aprox

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    depends on your tastes and needs.

    Most of this stuff is very user dependent. Some people can't give up storing programs on their computer. Me? I couldn't care less about that feature. :)

    But I went cold turkey and quit cable 3 days ago and switched to YTTV and so far so good. I recommend going that route. Easy to do. Free to try. Unlimited tuners and storage are big wins. Never have to delete anything and actually you can't delete stuff. lol. The fact the wife can sit on the tv downstairs with her own profile is also nice. Also found it's nice that you can reboot your streaming box and recordings aren't messed up.

    also now I can say, "hey Siri, skip 3 minutes" and 3 minutes of commercials are skipped with no remote control in sight.
     
  6. Mikeguy

    Mikeguy Well-Known Member

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    It all depends on the signal, of course. I'm in a populated area and with just my inside, table-top, amplified antenna, get most of the area OTA channels on my TE3 Bolt box pretty well so that I don't generally notice a signal issue. Having said that, every now-and-again (it comes and goes) I've had some issue between a couple of major stations (get one well and then the other one can pose issues now-and-again), but that seems to have settled down (knock wood). The last time I checked months back, I also had a reception issue with a nationwide older-show repeats sub-channel (MeTV?).
     
  7. BadMouth

    BadMouth Member

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    If you don't watch much live TV, it's a waste to spend $50 a month for a live tv service. I only watch a few cable tv shows and found the experience much better to just buy the current season through Amazon video (no commercials).

    One at a time, do a free trial of each of the various premium "channels" available through prime video and watch the movies you are interested in. Often you can get another free trial of the same content through Roku.

    Rip your own collection onto a hard drive and stream it via plex. Know what devices you will be using so you can rip them to a format that won't need transcoding. I picked up several complete series and movie collection dvd sets from a bargain store. I view the plex collection as a backup service to watch if l internet service goes down. (it never has)

    The Tivos or cheap streaming sticks work fine for both these apps.

    I like antenna TV with the Tivo, but it's not great for movies. They are edited for TV and there are commercials to skip. That said, you've already got the Tivo and antennas don't cost much.

    If you are looking for a different platform, roku has the best selection of legitimate apps.
    If you are looking to stream bootleg stuff from shady sources, stick to android.

    For now, the paid services do not penalize you for cancelling & restarting membership. So rotate them, only subscribing to one at a time.

    If you don't mind commercials, the IMDB channel through amazon and the Roku channel have decent movies for free.

    There are lots of options. Move in and spend a month or two exploring them.
     
  8. tenthplanet

    tenthplanet Well-Known Member

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    Make sure you get one that does VHF and UHF, a lot of areas have stations that use both set of frequencies. Some of small ones are terrible at VHF.
     
    unclehonkey likes this.
  9. WVZR1

    WVZR1 Active Member

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    The WV...
    LOCATION and what's available for Internet would certainly aid in 'others' mentioning ideas!!

    Location and what TV market? Zip code? How is the Internet distributed throughout the complex? Speeds available?
     
    wizwor likes this.
  10. mattyro7878

    mattyro7878 Well-Known Member

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    Were you aware of the cable situation before you moved,? This may sound ridiculous but that is one of my first considerations when looking for housing.
     
    dishrich, WVZR1 and PSU_Sudzi like this.
  11. wizwor

    wizwor Active Member

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    You need to start by making a list of the programs you watch. Note, too, whether you watch by appointment or time shift. While you are watching television, do you pause, rewind, etc.? How many concurrent sessions does your family require?

    I would definitely look at broadcast television. After the initial setup, it is 100% free. Even if you only use it occasionally, it's not costing you anything. When considering streaming tv, pay attention to concurrent streams, inquire about the availability of local channels, and see what kind of high speed internet you get at the new location.

    If you want to get the gps coordinates and distance off the ground of the place you would install an antenna, I would be happy to look at your OTA situation.

     
  12. omelet1978

    omelet1978 Active Member

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    I have not actually moved yet
     
  13. wmcbrine

    wmcbrine Well-Known Mumbler

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    I assume this means they have some kind of special deals on DirecTV for residents? Is there any reason you don't want to include DirecTV in your list of options?

    Is your Bolt not OTA-capable? It's a good choice if it is, but if you had to replace it, you might want to look into something cheaper than the Edge.

    You shouldn't worry about OTA quality, IMHO -- in the digital age, the picture is pretty much either perfect, or absent. As for content, in a brief period when we went OTA-only, I was impressed by how much the TiVo improved the experience, finding good stuff whenever and wherever it was on. We ended up watching a lot of PBS. :)
     
  14. WVZR1

    WVZR1 Active Member

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    The WV...
    That's certainly not what you hinted/mentioned in your OP!!! It certainly seems you hinted a 'commitment'!

    Maybe you now mention LOCATION, TV DMA and certainly investigate 'options' maybe more closely!!! How is Internet distributed in the 'complex'?
     
  15. aspexil

    aspexil Member

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    There is also sling tv and the black airtv box for OTA.
     

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