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Lightning strike took out my new Tivo and TV.

Discussion in 'TiVo Help Center' started by dadrepus, Sep 8, 2018.

  1. Sep 8, 2018 #1 of 34
    dadrepus

    dadrepus Member

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    Jan 4, 2012
    Columbia, MD
    Tivo is only a few weeks old as I got it from the summer sale. TV is old plasma so I'll just get another.
    What is the procedure and cost of getting my Tivo replaced or repaired? Has anyone gone through this before? Tivo so new that I didn't even have any recordings on it. :-(
     
  2. Sep 8, 2018 #2 of 34
    dlfl

    dlfl Cranky old novice

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    Dayton OH
    Bummer! First data point you should get is to call TiVo support and see what they say.

    What TiVo model?
     
  3. Sep 8, 2018 #3 of 34
    UCLABB

    UCLABB Well-Known Member

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    Riverside, CA
    Whatever you do, don't tell them it was lightning. Just tell them it quit working. If you're on monthly, they'll replace it. If you are on lifetime, check the warranty. I think it is 90 days.
     
    Teeps and jcondon like this.
  4. Sep 8, 2018 #4 of 34
    just4tivo

    just4tivo Active Member

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    If the TiVo and TV was plugged into a quality UPS or surge-spike protector those equipment manufacturers usually include insurance to cover this type of damage.

    Your home owner or renter insurance will cover this type of damage but the deductible is usually high and you might not want to file a claim for this relatively small amount of money cause it might increase your premium.
     
  5. Sep 8, 2018 #5 of 34
    dadrepus

    dadrepus Member

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    Jan 4, 2012
    Columbia, MD
    I wont be using my home owners insurance to cover this. Deductible is too high. I bought the 500gb 4 tuner Vox with lifetime. I wiil call on monday.
     
  6. Sep 8, 2018 #6 of 34
    just4tivo

    just4tivo Active Member

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    Agree. Maybe save up for a quality UPS or at least a quality surge-spike protector that includes insurance at no charge.

    Panamax is a good company for surge-spike that's been around quite a while.

    If you're a Costco member they stock a nice Cyberpower 1350va UPS for $99.95. both companies include insurance.
     
  7. Sep 8, 2018 #7 of 34
    dadrepus

    dadrepus Member

    186
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    Jan 4, 2012
    Columbia, MD
    Looks like i'll be replacing my Onkyo receiver as well as my Roku. Funny thing is the stuff in my man cave wasn't affected.
    That's where the good stuff is. IS there such a thing as a whole house surge protector?
     
  8. Sep 8, 2018 #8 of 34
    just4tivo

    just4tivo Active Member

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    There is BUT every cable and every connection has to be protected... ethernet, coax antenna, coax cable, sat dish, DSL line, etc.

    A significant surge/spike will find a way in that you didn't think to protect.

    Easier and more cost effective to use a UPS on a DVR and quality surge-spike protector on non hard drive electronics.

    A proximity lightning hit will most likely get through but that's what the damage insurance ethical protection equipment manufacturers provide is for.

    If you had been protected all you'd be doing is filling out a form and waiting for a check.

    This has been discussed all over the forum. Search for UPS UNIT or surge spike
     
  9. Sep 8, 2018 #9 of 34
    Soapm

    Soapm Active Member

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    Aurora, CO
    If you're in a high lightning area put a rod on your roof and make sure it has a good ground.
     
  10. slowbiscuit

    slowbiscuit FUBAR

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    Sep 19, 2006
    In the ATL
    That's not going to help for the most common strikes which come in via a cable, not by a hit to your house. Not a bad idea but little protection overall.
     
  11. just4tivo

    just4tivo Active Member

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    Dec 9, 2015
    Ditto...
     
  12. chiguy50

    chiguy50 Active Member

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    Atlanta, GA
    I suffered some A/V equipment damage a few weeks ago that I am assuming was due to a surge that came over the coax when a storm took out the servicing Comcast transformer. (Adding insult to injury, it took two days and multiple phone calls to get our internet service restored since the initial repair crew screwed up our feed at the transformer.)

    All of my electronics are protected by half a dozen CyberPower UPS's, and there was no power outage or other signs of an electrical anomaly, which is why I have narrowed the suspected source to the coax.

    Fortunately, all of the significantly effected components (Oppo UDP-203, Denon AVR-X8500H, and DarbeeVision DVP-5000S) are covered by the manufacturer's warranty and have been or will be repaired/replaced, but I would like to try to avert a repeat occurrence.

    I tried out an in-line coaxial surge protector, but I found that it interfered with the Comcast CTV signal on some of my channels (as a Comcast technician had warned me might be the case), so that was a no-go.

    Is there a better solution to protecting from power issues emanating from the CTV coaxial input?
     
  13. Sparky1234

    Sparky1234 Totally

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    Home owners insurance may cover your loss. When you tell TiVo a lightening strike caused the failure then it is an act of God then you are on your own.... Warranties do not cover lightening!
     
  14. just4tivo

    just4tivo Active Member

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    Ran into the same problem when I was with Dish and then DirecTV. You need a surge-spike protector that has wide enough bandwidth on the coax so as not to degrade the signal. IIRC it used to be 3GHz for DBS.

    Cheap units won't do that but I ultimately found that Panamax knew about the bandwidth and their products met the spec.
    It's been a while so give them a call and see what they say.
     
    chiguy50 likes this.
  15. chiguy50

    chiguy50 Active Member

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    Atlanta, GA
    I'm first going to try routing the coax thru my UPS's. I hadn't been doing that because I didn't want to run the risk of signal diminution, but if it will help to protect my equipment from future potential damage then it's worth experimenting to see how the data and video strength is impacted.
     
  16. just4tivo

    just4tivo Active Member

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    Dec 9, 2015
    there should be a spec for the coax bandwidth in the documentation.
     
  17. chiguy50

    chiguy50 Active Member

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    Atlanta, GA
    I have not found any pertinent specs for the coax input for any of my UPS's. However, after conferring with a tech rep at CyberPower, who stated that there should be no diminution to the coax signals routed through the UPS, I went ahead and made the routing changes for three of my connections.

    I connected my TiVo's coax through an LE825G, my PC through a CP685AVR-G, and the MoCA extender serving my wife's PC through a CP1000AVRLCD.

    I noted signal strength, S/N ratio, and Reed-Solomon error counts on all six tuners of the Roamio Pro before and after the change-over and there was no variance whatsoever. The downstream connection speeds on both PC's also appear to be unaffected (ca. 950Mbps via ethernet and ca. 800 via MoCA).

    I'll keep monitoring these numbers, but it appears that this is the way I should have had my equipment connected from the get-go. Whether the UPS's would have blocked whatever surge may have gone through the coax is an open question, but at least now I will avail myself of this capacity for the future. I'm hoping it will not prove necessary, but an ounce of prevention . . .
     
  18. just4tivo

    just4tivo Active Member

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    The acid test is whether or not you see and hear and a problem BUT the spec that matters is BANDWIDTH in GHz not SNR or error counts.

    I asked the same question to a multitude of manufacturers when I first saw this problem and only one, Panamax, knew of the problem with sat and cable coax.

    Check this out... Max 8 AV Pro - 8 AC; Coax and Tel; AVM, Line Filtration | Panamax

    Go to the bottom "Universal Coaxial Protection". See the specs for bandwidth? 5MHz - 2 GHz

    Now, go to HT1206UC2RC1 - Home Theater Surge Protectors - Product Details, Specs, Downloads | CyberPower

    See that spec is conspicuously ABSENT?

    I like the Cyberpower UPS units cause they are great bang for the buck but Cyberpower is ignorant of DBS and SAT and cable requirements.

    EDIT: I called Cyberpower and they are completely ignorant of the frequency bandwidth of their coax protection.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2018
    chiguy50 likes this.
  19. chiguy50

    chiguy50 Active Member

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    Nov 9, 2009
    Atlanta, GA
    Thanks for that feedback.

    The Panamax products don't really fit my needs. What do you think about this line of coaxial surge protectors from Tii? The specs on coax protection look similar to the Panamax. For about $16 I could try one out to see if it is compatible with my Comcast service and then buy two more if it appears suitable.
     
  20. Teeps

    Teeps Well-Known Member

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    Aug 16, 2001
    Torrance,Cal...
    Short story:
    My Roamio Basic was 7 days out of warranty when it "failed" completely; I.E. no lights etc...
    Cost $49 plus tax & shipping for a refurb unit.
    Note: the refurb they sent, in a plain brown box, did not include a power supply or remote.
     

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