LED TV Recomendation

Discussion in 'TiVo Series 1 - UK' started by davesh, Jun 10, 2011.

  1. davesh

    davesh New Member

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    Aug 11, 2007
    Tivoers,

    Embarrasingly we still have an old CRT telly that it in desperate need of replacement. Also embarrasingly I'm a luddite when it comes to TV technology. What I know is :

    1> I like the look of the new LED backlit panels
    2> that SWMBO won't put up with a TV larger than 37"
    3> that it must be black ( no gold or silver )
    4> that I am totally intent on continuing to use my Tivo for as long as possible ( thanks AltEPG ! ).

    When it comes to 1080p, 100Hz, USB, 5ms refresh, HDMI etc what should I be looking for ? Are there any gotchas for a Tivo user ? Are there any specific tellies that are an absolute steal at the moment ?

    Cheers

    Dave
     
  2. Heuer

    Heuer New Member

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    Mar 15, 2004
    Nottinghamshire
    Buy the best you can afford but it should be 1080p to deal with all HD content and Blu-ray. Personally I would buy a Panasonic Viera 32" with LED/LCD technology TX-L32E30B LED LCD TV which is the best out there. You could consider springing for the 3D version TX-L32DT30B (uses special LCD sequential glasses controlled by the screen) because, despite the cries of "shame", the technology does work and will be everywhere shortly. For frame sequence 3D you will need a HDMI 1.4 Blu-ray player although the PS3 (probably the best Blu-ray player you can buy) has just had a software update to accommodate 3D FS.

    The Viera will upscale your TiVo to make SD programmes look like HD. And I put my money were my mouth is as I have just ordered a 65" 3D Plasma from the same range.
     
  3. Automan

    Automan Ex TiVo User

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    Oct 29, 2000
    South...
    With out a doubt my 46" Panasonic plasma gave a better picture than my new 47" LG 3D LED TV.

    Still the LED TV eats less than 100 watts as the Panasonic used 350 to 500 watts.

    The latest plasma's use a bit less.

    My LG is the 47LX6900 which is now six months old so most likely obsolete :)

    If you get a 3D one make sure it comes with enough specs or allow another £100.00 each.

    Automan.
     
  4. davidshack

    davidshack Peripatetic member

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    Aug 17, 2002
    perpetual...
    IMO:

    must:
    be 1080p (resolution, resolution, resolution)
    have HDMI (only connection to get the quality)
    have RGB SCART (for TiVo connection)

    SIZE of screen to choose is SIMPLY A FUNCTION of VIEWING distance. The eyes have an optimum angle of view: you pick a screen to watch comfortably at the distance you sit. Which is why your netbook has a 12" screen and the local cinema an (eg) 12 metre one. Remember trying to sit in the front row at the cinema? Too close: your eyes were unable to take in all the action. Remember the old TV in the corner? Too far: you had to peer at the screen & still couldn't see detail.
    Got an old 35mm camera in a box somewhere? The view from its 50mm "standard" lens gives a fair idea of the eyes' comfort zone.
    .
    .
    People all have their own opinion (which they may defend ferociously) about screen technology. Projector? plasma? LCD? LED?

    LEDs are trendy, in part because manufacturers exist to sell - so need to persuade us to buy this year's "stuff". People like them because they are slim and use less electricity. The back-lit (my preference over edge-lit) LEDS are good TVs.
    (Though I think LED best at sets sizes of [say] up to 24"?)

    The latest PLASMAS are (IMHO) still head & shoulders, chest & knees the best for picture quality. But they use more electricity. Could cost a serious couch-potato what, £30 to £50 a year more? Isn't enjoying TV at its best worth that?

    LCD technology is poor at showing fast movement (which is one reason larger sets have 100Hz or 200Hz refresh rates). (In simple terms "LED TVs" are LCDs illuminated by low-consumption LEDs instead of conventional tubed lights)

    Personally I (only) use 1080p projectors and 120"-140" screens. Rolled-up screens & ceiling-fitted projectors are near invisible when not in use; prices have dropped dramatically (eg under £1,000 all in).

    The poster who suggested 3D is coming has to be correct - but I suspect the current set pricing includes an "early-adopter" premium.
    .
    .

    In short, choose set size based on viewing distance; make the cosmetics fit (rather than live with a poor compromise by doing it the wrong way round). Larger wall-mounted TVs can often be made acceptable to SWMBO by hanging a nice tapestry / picture so it covers the set when not in use.

    A plasma at 42" (diagonal measurement remember) is actually little longer/higher than a 37" set.

    Oh and be aware shops can use all sorts of tricks to make a set appear "super" on display - don't be fooled!
     
  5. Trinitron

    Trinitron New Member

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    Jan 20, 2003
    North West
  6. katman

    katman New Member

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    Jun 4, 2002
    East Anglia
    Get the set demonstrated using a DVD player connected via RGB SCART, preferably with a disc that you know.

    Way too many flat screen TVs give a superb picture with HDMI but do an awful job of displaying analogue sources.

    When I chose my Toshiba I did just that and the picture is fantastic. Realistic faces rather than the "painting by numbers" skin tones seen on lots of other TVs displaying analogue.
     
  7. Steve_K

    Steve_K Member

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    May 5, 2001
    Sussex, UK
    + make sure it's at least 1080p in both axes. Some cheaper plasmas are only 768p vertically and yes you can tell the difference
     
  8. Milhouse

    Milhouse Member

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    Sep 15, 2001
    South...
    I used one of the various screen-size guides, and bought a 42" wall mounted TV (the original Philips Aurea). When it arrived I thought it was absolutely huge (I previously had a 32" widescreen CRT stuck in the corner of the room) but after a couple of weeks, I became accustomed to the size of the new screen and eventually began wishing I'd been able to buy the next size up (ie. 45-47")!

    So my screen-size buying guide would be... determine the biggest TV you think your room can accommodate (taking into consideration the screen size guides linked above), then buy the next size up. :)
     
  9. Trinitron

    Trinitron New Member

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    Jan 20, 2003
    North West
    :confused: What are you on about?

    The number refers to horizontal resolution. Nothing else. Full HD is 1920 x 1080, but beware older screens claiming that resolution but can't handle 1080p - they downscale 1080i and 1080p to 720p then upscale it back to 1080, which is as nasty as it sounds. :D
     
  10. Steve_K

    Steve_K Member

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    May 5, 2001
    Sussex, UK
    So you've never seen 1366x768 TVs then? :rolleyes:

    Easy to get conned into buying one as being "better than 1080p" as arguably it is in one axis but that lack of vertical resolution will make a noticeable difference. Whatever the internal workings, nothing can make a display surface look better than it really is.
     
  11. Johnbyte

    Johnbyte New Member

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    Nov 4, 2008
    They will, however, be described as 'HD Ready' not 'Full HD'.
     
  12. Steve_K

    Steve_K Member

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    May 5, 2001
    Sussex, UK
    If only it were as simple as that. "Full HD" isn't an industry defined term and it allows sales staff and selling web sites to exploit the unwary.

    Digital Europe are usually seen as the defining body and these are the trademarks they own

    [​IMG] = can process HD signals
    [​IMG] = can process HD signals and has a digital decoder
    [​IMG] = can process HD signals and display to at least 1920x1080
    [​IMG] = can process HD signals and display to at least 1920x1080 and has a digital decoder

    Just asking for 1080p means nothing for vertical resolution.
     
  13. Trinitron

    Trinitron New Member

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    Jan 20, 2003
    North West
    Yes, but what has that got to do with:
    I've never seen references to 1080p vertical resolution. You want know why? Because it doesn't happen. You're always going to get pixel ratios of 1:1.78, ie 1280x720, 1366x768, 1920x1080 or the picture will be horribly distorted. From there it's the vertical resolution that counts and that will be 720p or 1080p. Progressive scan refers to the number of image lines delivered to the screen, that's all. LCD/LED screens can't interlace images so anything less than 1080p will be converted to 720p then upscaled to fit the screen size.
     
  14. Automan

    Automan Ex TiVo User

    4,184
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    Oct 29, 2000
    South...
  15. Steve_K

    Steve_K Member

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    May 5, 2001
    Sussex, UK
    You're just being picky Trinitron, I guess for the sake of it.

    1080p is an ambiguous term. It literally means 1080 pixels but some use it as a shorthand for "HD Ready 1080p" which is the Digital Europe trademark.

    And in that context 1080p means " . .The minimum native resolution of the display or display engine is 1080 physical lines . .." ie vertical resolution which makes
    a bit of a bizarre quote by you.

    Oh and "minimum" means "at least" which is the wording I used
     
  16. Trinitron

    Trinitron New Member

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    Jan 20, 2003
    North West
    No, just stating facts.

    I can see now that you are confusing vertical and horizontal. Your "1080 physical lines" vertical resolution is made up of 1,080 horizontal lines. That is referred to in all technical definitions as 'horizontal resolution', i.e. the number of horizontal lines capable of being displayed. If you have seen a display claiming 1080p vertical resolution I would like to see where you found it.

    And 1080p isn't ambiguous at all. 'p' = progressive; 'i' = interlaced. It's the displays that claim to be 1920x1080 HD but don't specify the 'p' which are ambiguous. Anything claiming to be 1080p that isn't is plain wrong.
     
  17. TCM2007

    TCM2007 New Member

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    Dec 25, 2006
    No it's not, 1080p means 1920 x 1080 progressive scan.

    HD Ready is as an ambiguous term (anything over 720 vertical can be called that) perhaps you are confusing the two?
     
  18. TCM2007

    TCM2007 New Member

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    Dec 25, 2006
    Sorry, you have that backwards, a 1080p set has a vertical resolution of 1080 pixels and a horizontal resolution of 1920 pixels,
     
  19. Trinitron

    Trinitron New Member

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    Jan 20, 2003
    North West
    I'm not disputing that, but traditionally TV resolution is the number of horizontal lines capable of being received - so a '625 line' CRT is capable of receiving 625 horizontal lines (interlaced), and a 1080 display can receive 1080 lines. 1080p is a shorthand means of describing the delivery method, i.e. 1080 horizontal lines in a single progressive scan, not the number of pixels used to display them.

    Digital Europe use that definition, not a pixel in sight:
     
  20. davesh

    davesh New Member

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    Aug 11, 2007
    I love you guys .... and Pete isn't even chipping in. What would happen if you were all put in a room and made to talk about televisions/Tivo etc. :D:D:D World War III ?

    Anyway to those who responded to my queries. Thanks. Most useful and educational.

    Anyway here's the plan, but you're not gonna like it ! I'm going to go on Ebay and buy a quality wide screen 32" CRT for about £20. Up to today I've been watching a 26" CRT with no widescreen so it can't really disappoint. Then in a couple of years when backlit LED tellies are £299 AND include full wireless Internet browsing I'll consider investing.

    Cheers

    Dave
     

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