Info for new Tivo people

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by hktiller, Nov 19, 2015.

  1. hktiller

    hktiller New Member

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    Nov 19, 2015

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    Hi, My husband wants something like DVR for Christmas but where we live we aren't able to get it, so I am looking for info about Tivo and how it works. We don't have Dish or Direct TV. We are strictly cable.
    Can anyone tell me how this works, how its set up, any info would be appreciated as I don't know anything.
    Thanks for your help
    C Tiller
     
  2. tarheelblue32

    tarheelblue32 Well-Known Member

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    Who is your cable provider? TiVo works with digital cable with a small device you get from your cable company called a CableCard. The FCC requires all the major cable companies to support CableCards, but some small cable companies aren't required to support them.
     
  3. hktiller

    hktiller New Member

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    charter communications, I did go to their office and the girl there said they aren't offering DVR's here in our area. We are very remote to most places. She suggested the Tivo
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2015
  4. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    Check with your cable company and make sure they offer CableCARDs. (99% do, but just to be safe) If they do then you need to go to your local cable office and pick up a CableCARD (and maybe a tuning adapter too) or call and schedule an appointment to have it installed by them. When you put the card in the TiVo it will pop up a screen with some info they need to authorize it. You call in and give them a few numbers off that screen and if all goes well you'll be up in running in a few minutes. The rest of the setup process is pretty self explanatory.

    Edit: Charter definitely does CableCARDs, so you just need to get the card and the TiVo and you should be good to go.
     
  5. tarheelblue32

    tarheelblue32 Well-Known Member

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    Okay good, Charter does have to support CableCards. You will need to get a CableCard from Charter and stick it in the TiVo. Then you call up Charter and they will go through a process to "pair" the CableCard to your TiVo so that the TiVo can decrypt and record all the digital channels you receive from Charter.

    In theory, it is a simple process, but sometimes there can be hiccups in the initial setup. If you do run into any problems, you can come back here and we should be able to talk you through any issues that you might run into.
     
  6. hktiller

    hktiller New Member

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    Nov 19, 2015
    Thanks so much for the help! Now I can go ahead with the Christmas present he wanted so much!
    Merry Christmas to you all!
     
  7. unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    Now you need to post another thread about which TiVo model to get and whether to get any of the stuff that let's you "borrow" one of its tuners to watch on a second TV (usually in another room).

    You also need to learn about connecting the TiVo to your home network so that it can get on the internet to download program guide data and other stuff from the TiVo servers.
     
  8. dlfl

    dlfl Cranky old novice

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    Also, TiVo's have a 90 day full warranty and a one year "parts" warranty that normally requires you to pay return shipping + $50 "labor". They actually just replace it with a reconditioned unit. You can get extended warranties but whether they are a good deal depends on which TiVo model you buy, among other things.

    Warranty period starts on day of purchase -- not when you receive it or start using it.

    As already noted you need an internet connection -- absolutely critical to proper operation.

    I agree with the earlier poster who said you should discuss your expectations in detail here and get advice on which model to buy and whether to buy a mini extender or several.

    I also suggest you post your location and hopefully someone else using a TiVo in that system can post their experiences regarding CableCARD, Tuning Adapter, and installation.
     
  9. MrDell

    MrDell Active Member

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    If you are purchasing a lifetime subscription, I would highly recommend getting a three year extended warranty. It is not very expensive and it will protect your investment incase something happens within your "payback" period.
     
  10. CoxInPHX

    CoxInPHX COX Communications

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    If her area does not even offer DVRs, (I find that hard to believe), is it possible that her cable is all still analog?

    If so, then a new TiVo would not work, neither would a CableCARD, she would need a 2 Tuner Premiere, correct?
     
  11. tatergator1

    tatergator1 Well-Known Member

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    My thought exactly as I was reading through. All analog is certainly a possibility given the way she described her location. Charter may not have the appropriate headend hardware to handle CableCards.
     
  12. series5orpremier

    series5orpremier Well-Known Member

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    Doubtful it's analog. Charter had apparently switched to all digital since over a year ago.
     
  13. tarheelblue32

    tarheelblue32 Well-Known Member

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    I find it hard to imagine that in 2015 there is a Charter area that is still all analog, but it does seem strange that they don't offer DVRs in her area.
     
  14. mdavej

    mdavej Well-Known Member

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    I was thinking exactly the same thing. As a Charter sub, I see a few in the Charter forums now and then claiming they're still in an analog Charter market. This in spite of the fact that Charter supposedly went all digital years ago. So anything is possible, especially since they don't offer DVRs. That's highly unusual.

    I think it would be worthwhile for the original poster to call them again and get confirmation.
     
  15. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    Good thing to ask about. I forgot there were still some cable systems with analog channels. We went all digital a couple years ago and most started at least simulcasting before that.
     
  16. ej42137

    ej42137 Well-Known Member

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    Only a spendthrift will waste their money on an extended warranty for electronics equipment. It is the wrong end of a very bad bet.
     
  17. JoeKustra

    JoeKustra in the other Alabama TCF Club

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    Sometimes I wonder. Is it so hard to plug the cable into the television and do a channel scan? The results of the scan should answer the question "on what channel do you receive CBS?". Problem solved. No decimal point means either analog or a local redistribution system, both which would require a Premiere. And there is still zap2it with a zipcode and provider name. Sometimes zap2it assumes a cable card, which is why a TV scan is better.
     
  18. MrDell

    MrDell Active Member

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    It isn't only the electronics equipment you are protecting... It is the investment in your lifetime purchase! If I remember correctly is around $40.00 for three years to protect a $499.00 lifetime sub plus the TiVo itself. Maybe it's me, but I really don't think that is too bad.
     
  19. atmuscarella

    atmuscarella Well-Known Member

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    All Insurance is for financial protection. You buy insurance for whatever you can not afford the financial loss if something goes wrong. Some people also buy insurance out of fear of a loss that they really don't need financial protection from. This type of purchase (which is what most extended warranties are) does have value because it makes people feel better. I call it the "feel good" effect but it is pretty hard to assign a dollar value to it as it is different for each person.

    I tell people to remember the simple fact that everyone's insurance premiums have to cover the companies profit and overhead along with loss payouts, therefor loss payouts are always less than premiums paid. This simple fact means the more things you insure that you don't need to protect yourself from financial loss if something goes wrong the less money you will have. In the end each person needs to decide how much the "feel good" effect is worth, because that is the only way extended warranties can really be justified.
     
  20. ej42137

    ej42137 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, what he said.

    I'll add that I've owned enough TiVos to be confident that the odds of a payout are stacked heavily against anyone who buys an extended warranty.

    Another thing to consider is that the cost of an extended warranty is about the cost TiVo charges for the exchange program of a box not on a lifetime service, which is relevant now that "Lifetime" is no longer a great deal.

    But if you want to change the possibility of losing money into a sure thing, by all means, buy that extended warranty. At least purchase it from TiVo and help keep the company solvent.

    It's an awful deal. You forgot to multiple the total cost by the likelihood of failure during those three years. Even the dreaded Series 3 Capacitor Plague didn't raise the failure rate enough to make it sensible.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2015

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