Indoor antenna recommendation for Roamio 4-tuner?

Discussion in 'TiVo Roamio DVRs' started by randian, Sep 4, 2019.

  1. MikeekiM

    MikeekiM Palindromer

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    Pretty accurate though... The same antenna that works perfect in one situation won't work in another...

    And I am not even talking macro level geographic differences... Even in the same neighborhood... Line of sight issues are different, the amount and type of multi path interference issues, mounting location challenges... All of these different, even in the case of the person right next door to you...
     
  2. Mikeguy

    Mikeguy Well-Known Member

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    ^ This. And buying from a source with a good return policy can be a heaven-sent gift.
     
    Teeps likes this.
  3. randian

    randian Active Member

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    Speaking of which, how is Amazon's free return policy? Several indoor antennas sold by them say "Free Returns", but the fine print says "new and unused condition", which to me implies if you've opened it and it doesn't work for you you're stuck. That isn't very useful.
     
  4. Mikeguy

    Mikeguy Well-Known Member

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    I haven't had occasion to return under the store's newer "free returns" policy, but personally, I would take the language to mean that you may open the box and try an item out, as long as the item looks the same (like new) when you put it back in the box to return it--just like trying on a shirt for fit.*

    For an indoor tabletop antenna, probably pretty easy to do; for an outdoor antenna that gets mounted, perhaps more difficult. Of course, there's also free returns via Kohl's, as well as the same old Amazon.com return process for items that are not functioning as intended.

    * I recently did purchase a television optical splitter from Amazon.com which offered free returns, and that is how I see the return policy for the item, which I still need to hook up--if it doesn't work as I had hoped, it will go back to Amazon.com under the policy.
     
  5. pshivers

    pshivers Retired

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    Amazon's return policy is as stated.

    If you don't like the product for any reason, simply say so online. They may ask a general question why you are returning it. Then you print the return label, box up the item and ship it out via the carrier the label is for. I believe they give a generous time to get the package back to them, 30 or 60 days from your request to return.

    I've used Amazon almost exclusively for many years. I've have had a few returns for a variety of reasons. Amazon has always made it easy.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
     
  6. JackMcC

    JackMcC Active Member

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    Dont worry. Amazon is only going to repackage your returned item and ship it out to someone else.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2019
  7. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp South Alabama

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    I just had an incident with Amazon regarding some re-filled toner cartridges. They were bricked when I got them (twin-pack). I went online, started a return, took the retail box to "The UPS Store", showed them the QR code on my phone, took the receipt that was handed to me, and when I got home that evening I had a notice from Amazon that they had "tentatively" issued my credit since I had tendered the package to UPS. The box was simply the retail packaging with no shipping address...UPS did all the packing an labeling. As long as they don't charge the credit back to me I'm happy....except that the toner cartridges were bad and I've still got to find some that work.<sigh>
     
  8. josim

    josim Member

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    I would try a DIY coat hanger antenna in order to check reception and to determine the best location in you house to locate the antenna. 6 coat hangers, a scrap 1 by 4 and a transformer/balun which you may need anyway.
    Something like this: Make a Digital TV Coat Hanger Antenna | Make:

    If that works for you, and it should, you may want to invest in 10 feet of 10 gauge copper or aluminum and make a gray hoverman antenna: Hoverman TV Antenna

    Mine is copper on a pvc 1" x 4" trim board and located in the attic. I am 33 to 47 miles from my towers in the upstate of South Carolina.

    I noticed a new wide band design in my search for these links but, I have no experience with that design.
     
  9. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp South Alabama

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    If I was thinking about setting up an antenna for OTA reception *and* considering disconnecting my cable/satellite/etc service I go fishing. Seriously.

    #1: Buy a 50' coax cable and a small, but decent *outdoor* antenna. With some stations moving from UHF to VHF it makes it a little more "interesting" in locating a small antenna with half-decent VHF performance. Thus, my recommendation for a small outdoor antenna. (TIP: If your local Wallyworld/Lowes/HomeDespot/etc., have antennas they are handy in case you want to return the antenna.)

    #2: Connect antenna to television and place the antenna where you *think* you want it.

    #3: Do a channel scan and see what you get.

    #4: If you pick up several channels...good!!!

    #5: Check signal strengths and turn to a channel with a somewhat weak signal.

    #6: Now, with that 50' cable move the antenna around the room. Turning it in different directions. Raising it up and down. You are "fishing" for a signal. Just a short distance to the left or right , up or down can sometimes make a big difference. Maybe slip the coax cable out a window and sample how reception is outside....outside usually always gives better results.

    #7: Make notes of how the signal strength changes. Flip back to the stronger channels every now and then to verify that they're still being received well.

    #8: When you decide that you've got the antenna in the perfect spot re-scan for channels.

    #9: The sad thing is that usually the best spot for the antenna is right in the middle of the room or right above the couch/easy-chair.<grin>

    You'll have to work with the restraints of your environment and how you want to run/hide the coax cable. But, "fishing" like this will let you know if it's feasible to receive, with a decent signal, the networks that you desire (you want them all ;)).

    If the fishing is poor and you couldn't find a honey hole where you could catch good signals then box up the antenna (maybe even the coax cable if you're really neat about things) and return to the store.

    Don't kill your cable/sat account until you know that you can reliably receive OTA signals at your location. Of course, there are streaming alternatives, too. We have HULU Live(college football, it will drop back to regular ($6) HULU after the season is over), Netflix(grandkids account), and Amazon Prime. But, we watch more OTA (Tivo-DVR'd) than we do streaming content.

    Go fishing...you need the relaxation. :D
     
  10. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp South Alabama

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    A good thing about flat-type antennas such as a 4-bay (or even 8-bay!) bowtie is that they can be concealed behind a painting/print or even mounted inside of a closet or attic. Or, make a stand and rest it on an entertainment cabinet as @Teeps showed in his post.

    Be aware, too, of what type of construction your house is...stucco will have wire-mesh underneath the stucco which will basically create a Faraday cage that will shut down your reception. Metal siding and roofing are usually bad news. Foil-backed insulation...bad.

    Location, too, is important. Rural, on a hill...probably good. Urban, stuck in between other buildings/houses can be tough...multi-path interference and basic blocked signals. But, sometimes reflected signals can be good. Like someone mentioned...whatever antenna works at your location is the one you need...there's just not a model that covers all situations.

    Depending on your location you might just want to try a set of rabbit ears to start with...long elements that are favorable to VHF reception.

    Just some thoughts.
    Best wishes on your project!
     
    Teeps likes this.
  11. pshivers

    pshivers Retired

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    This is a photo of my home in Sunny Southern California, just before we sold it and moved to Lubbock, Texas this past June.

    You may notice I have a bit of an antenna array attached to the chimney.

    It includes a omnidirectional HAM radio antenna, a small cell phone booster antenna, a Direct TV dish and last but not least a 30+ year old Radio Shack multi-element directional uhf/vhf TV antenna.

    TV station antennas in the greater Los Angels area are almost all located to the North on top of Mt. Wilson at an elevation of 5,000'. I had a direct physical view of these antenna even though they're about 20 miles away. My house was at 500' elevation directly South of Mt. Wilson.

    That old antenna was probably overkill but it provided flawless reception of 165 OTA digital stations that are available in Southern California and one lone low power analog station (ch. 6) as well all FM radio stations. It had signal splitters delivering its signal to the three bedrooms and the Living room. As you can see by evidence of the satellite dish, we also had DirecTV. The OTA was needed everytime a good thunderstorm went through the area as we would lose satellite reception.

    It was a good OTA setup orginally meant for analog tv reception, but worked as an excellent solution for Digital HDTV reception as well....

    There are also situation that a #1 paperclip will do the job...[​IMG]

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
     
  12. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp South Alabama

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    Yep, as long as the wind don't get it metal don't rot. ;)

    It's interesting that (from what I know) the early television channels frequented the VHF band...and here we are migrating back to that band.
     
  13. josim

    josim Member

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    South Carolina
    I don't think anyone mentioned this yet. Go to:
    TV Fool
    Here you can input your address and it will provide info for the type of antenna you may need and the direction(s) of the TV towers. This will help you orient your antenna.
     
  14. pshivers

    pshivers Retired

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    Lubbock, Texas
    FCC is busy squeezing the TV band to give more room for cell phone reception...

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
     
  15. 53richart

    53richart Member

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    Acworth, GA
    Another resource is RabbitEars. It is more up to date than TV Fool.
     
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  16. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp South Alabama

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    Oh yeah. I'm a HAM radio operator (been inactive for a few years) and have seen the bands get squeezed. Cellphones, security systems, etc., are money-makers.

    We just had our main CBS station switch to their new frequency. It seems to be working better than ever. Our local FOX station just switched, too...it appears they're having troubles as I haven't received a signal from them since the switch-over. I had a couple of emails from one of the guys at the station, we'll probably talk this afternoon or tomorrow. We are in a rural area from the FOX station and probably 30 miles from the tower. Hopefully they'll get things squared away soon. So, *maybe* once the spiderwebs are cleaned out of the repacking process things will be good.
     
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  17. Intheswamp

    Intheswamp South Alabama

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    Yes, TV Fool's database hasn't been updated in quiet a while. My strongest station doesn't even show up on my query there. So, take TV Fool results with a grain of salt and apply lots of logic to what you read in your report from there. TV Fool *was* the "cat's meow" just a year or two ago...it worked great. Sad to see it gathering dust.
     

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